Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /homepages/41/d79740523/htdocs/converternews/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/syndicatedlink.class.php on line 302

FAF deciding on filters on post to be syndicated:

Canadian Printing Awards – Congratulations Jet Label!

Array ( [post_title] => Canadian Printing Awards – Congratulations Jet Label! [post_content] =>

The Canadian Printing Awards is an annual event, currently in its 14th year, that celebrates the excellence and innovation of the printing industry in Canada.

The awards cover a wide range of print and printing-related categories, Industry Achievement, Print Design, Printing, Technology and Environmental.

The 2019 awards were presented at a gala event in Toronto and a total of 113 gold, silver and bronze awards were presented.

We are thrilled that the newest member of our ProMach Labeling & Coding family, Jet Label swept the awards in the Digital Label category, winning gold, silver and bronze.

 

This is a fantastic achievement and all three Jet Label submissions would have been worthy of first place. Here is the gold award and the winning label, printed for Dog Island Brewing:

To show just how consistent the Jet Label quality is, this isn’t the first time our colleagues have dominated the Digital Label category at the awards. Here are the gold, silver and bronze winners from 2018 – see a trend here?

Jet Label is Western Canada’s largest supplier of high-quality labels (both digital and flexo) with large investments in equipment and a super team of motivated professionals. A great addition to the ProMach family.

With 7 label converting and printing plants across the United States and Canada, ProMach is your local label company with national reach and support. Combining our labels with ID Technology and EPI labeling equipment is the best way to ensure your products project the right image.

Want to get started improving your labels and labeling? Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3. You can also email me at david.holliday@promachbuilt.com. We’ll be sure to get you in touch with an expert, right in your area!

[post_excerpt] => The Canadian Printing Awards is an annual event, currently in its 14th year, that celebrates the excellence and innovation of the printing industry in Canada. The awards cover a wide range of print and printing-related categories, Industry Achievement, Print Design, Printing, Technology and Environmental. The 2019 awards were presented at a gala event in Toronto […] [post_date_gmt] => 2019-11-08 22:12:39 [post_date] => 2019-11-08 22:12:39 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-11-08 22:12:39 [post_modified] => 2019-11-08 22:12:39 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => http://www.labelingnews.com/?p=5966 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Labeling News [syndication_source_uri] => http://www.labelingnews.com [syndication_source_id] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed_id] => 12 [syndication_permalink] => http://www.labelingnews.com/2019/11/canadian-printing-awards-congratulations-jet-label/ [syndication_item_hash] => 688fde332c4ebb0e26d74b655a18f93e ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 1625 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

Doing filter:faf_image_filter

Execute image filter

Image process

Local save:http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/2019printawards.jpg

Image process :: Saving local image

grab remote location : http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/2019printawards.jpg

Image exists, checking for same file size

Replacing images : - ON

The Canadian Printing Awards is an annual event, currently in its 14th year, that celebrates the excellence and innovation of the printing industry in Canada.

The awards cover a wide range of print and printing-related categories, Industry Achievement, Print Design, Printing, Technology and Environmental.

The 2019 awards were presented at a gala event in Toronto and a total of 113 gold, silver and bronze awards were presented.

We are thrilled that the newest member of our ProMach Labeling & Coding family, Jet Label swept the awards in the Digital Label category, winning gold, silver and bronze.

 

This is a fantastic achievement and all three Jet Label submissions would have been worthy of first place. Here is the gold award and the winning label, printed for Dog Island Brewing:

To show just how consistent the Jet Label quality is, this isn’t the first time our colleagues have dominated the Digital Label category at the awards. Here are the gold, silver and bronze winners from 2018 – see a trend here?

Jet Label is Western Canada’s largest supplier of high-quality labels (both digital and flexo) with large investments in equipment and a super team of motivated professionals. A great addition to the ProMach family.

With 7 label converting and printing plants across the United States and Canada, ProMach is your local label company with national reach and support. Combining our labels with ID Technology and EPI labeling equipment is the best way to ensure your products project the right image.

Want to get started improving your labels and labeling? Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3. You can also email me at david.holliday@promachbuilt.com. We’ll be sure to get you in touch with an expert, right in your area!

Local save:http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/canadaawardgold.jpg

Image process :: Saving local image

grab remote location : http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/canadaawardgold.jpg

Image exists, checking for same file size

Replacing images : - ON

The Canadian Printing Awards is an annual event, currently in its 14th year, that celebrates the excellence and innovation of the printing industry in Canada.

The awards cover a wide range of print and printing-related categories, Industry Achievement, Print Design, Printing, Technology and Environmental.

The 2019 awards were presented at a gala event in Toronto and a total of 113 gold, silver and bronze awards were presented.

We are thrilled that the newest member of our ProMach Labeling & Coding family, Jet Label swept the awards in the Digital Label category, winning gold, silver and bronze.

Canadian Printing Awards – Congratulations Jet Label!

 

This is a fantastic achievement and all three Jet Label submissions would have been worthy of first place. Here is the gold award and the winning label, printed for Dog Island Brewing:

To show just how consistent the Jet Label quality is, this isn’t the first time our colleagues have dominated the Digital Label category at the awards. Here are the gold, silver and bronze winners from 2018 – see a trend here?

Jet Label is Western Canada’s largest supplier of high-quality labels (both digital and flexo) with large investments in equipment and a super team of motivated professionals. A great addition to the ProMach family.

With 7 label converting and printing plants across the United States and Canada, ProMach is your local label company with national reach and support. Combining our labels with ID Technology and EPI labeling equipment is the best way to ensure your products project the right image.

Want to get started improving your labels and labeling? Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3. You can also email me at david.holliday@promachbuilt.com. We’ll be sure to get you in touch with an expert, right in your area!

Local save:http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/2018canadaawards.jpg

Image process :: Saving local image

grab remote location : http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/2018canadaawards.jpg

Image exists, checking for same file size

Replacing images : - ON

The Canadian Printing Awards is an annual event, currently in its 14th year, that celebrates the excellence and innovation of the printing industry in Canada.

The awards cover a wide range of print and printing-related categories, Industry Achievement, Print Design, Printing, Technology and Environmental.

The 2019 awards were presented at a gala event in Toronto and a total of 113 gold, silver and bronze awards were presented.

We are thrilled that the newest member of our ProMach Labeling & Coding family, Jet Label swept the awards in the Digital Label category, winning gold, silver and bronze.

Canadian Printing Awards – Congratulations Jet Label!

 

This is a fantastic achievement and all three Jet Label submissions would have been worthy of first place. Here is the gold award and the winning label, printed for Dog Island Brewing:

Canadian Printing Awards – Congratulations Jet Label!

To show just how consistent the Jet Label quality is, this isn’t the first time our colleagues have dominated the Digital Label category at the awards. Here are the gold, silver and bronze winners from 2018 – see a trend here?

Jet Label is Western Canada’s largest supplier of high-quality labels (both digital and flexo) with large investments in equipment and a super team of motivated professionals. A great addition to the ProMach family.

With 7 label converting and printing plants across the United States and Canada, ProMach is your local label company with national reach and support. Combining our labels with ID Technology and EPI labeling equipment is the best way to ensure your products project the right image.

Want to get started improving your labels and labeling? Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3. You can also email me at david.holliday@promachbuilt.com. We’ll be sure to get you in touch with an expert, right in your area!

Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Labeling News [syndication_source_uri] => http://www.labelingnews.com [syndication_source_id] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed_id] => 12 [syndication_permalink] => http://www.labelingnews.com/2019/11/canadian-printing-awards-congratulations-jet-label/ [syndication_item_hash] => 688fde332c4ebb0e26d74b655a18f93e )

Execute : Enclosure images

Enclosure save:

Array ( [0] => )

No match on

Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :Canadian Printing Awards – Congratulations Jet Label!

Array ( [post_title] => Canadian Printing Awards – Congratulations Jet Label! [post_content] =>

The Canadian Printing Awards is an annual event, currently in its 14th year, that celebrates the excellence and innovation of the printing industry in Canada.

The awards cover a wide range of print and printing-related categories, Industry Achievement, Print Design, Printing, Technology and Environmental.

The 2019 awards were presented at a gala event in Toronto and a total of 113 gold, silver and bronze awards were presented.

We are thrilled that the newest member of our ProMach Labeling & Coding family, Jet Label swept the awards in the Digital Label category, winning gold, silver and bronze.

Canadian Printing Awards – Congratulations Jet Label!

 

This is a fantastic achievement and all three Jet Label submissions would have been worthy of first place. Here is the gold award and the winning label, printed for Dog Island Brewing:

Canadian Printing Awards – Congratulations Jet Label!

To show just how consistent the Jet Label quality is, this isn’t the first time our colleagues have dominated the Digital Label category at the awards. Here are the gold, silver and bronze winners from 2018 – see a trend here?

Canadian Printing Awards – Congratulations Jet Label!

Jet Label is Western Canada’s largest supplier of high-quality labels (both digital and flexo) with large investments in equipment and a super team of motivated professionals. A great addition to the ProMach family.

With 7 label converting and printing plants across the United States and Canada, ProMach is your local label company with national reach and support. Combining our labels with ID Technology and EPI labeling equipment is the best way to ensure your products project the right image.

Want to get started improving your labels and labeling? Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3. You can also email me at david.holliday@promachbuilt.com. We’ll be sure to get you in touch with an expert, right in your area!

[post_excerpt] => The Canadian Printing Awards is an annual event, currently in its 14th year, that celebrates the excellence and innovation of the printing industry in Canada. The awards cover a wide range of print and printing-related categories, Industry Achievement, Print Design, Printing, Technology and Environmental. The 2019 awards were presented at a gala event in Toronto […] [post_date_gmt] => 2019-11-08 22:12:39 [post_date] => 2019-11-08 22:12:39 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-11-08 22:12:39 [post_modified] => 2019-11-08 22:12:39 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => http://www.labelingnews.com/?p=5966 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Labeling News [syndication_source_uri] => http://www.labelingnews.com [syndication_source_id] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed_id] => 12 [syndication_permalink] => http://www.labelingnews.com/2019/11/canadian-printing-awards-congratulations-jet-label/ [syndication_item_hash] => 688fde332c4ebb0e26d74b655a18f93e [faf_featured_image] => 0 [faf_process_image] => 0,0,0 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 1625 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

FAF deciding on filters on post to be syndicated:

Product Coding for Protein Producers

Array ( [post_title] => Product Coding for Protein Producers [post_content] =>

Regardless of package type, companies that produce meat or poultry products need to add variable information to the package. This includes date and lot codes, establishment codes, regulatory agency logos, and increasingly barcodes.

In many industries, this is quite straightforward, but for protein companies, there is the added complication of the environment in which coding and packaging equipment has to operate. Cold and wet conditions are the norm and any equipment brought into the plants needs to be able to handle this as well as washdown situations.

Traditionally continuous inkjet (CIJ) printers have been used for printing variable information onto meat and poultry packaging. These printers can usually handle the harsh conditions found on the packaging lines and also produce the print quality that is good enough for the applications. Thermal inkjet (TIJ) printers have not been used in the past due to the inks being unsuitable for use on the films used for the packaging.

inkjet printing for protein companies

Over the last few years, however, there have been great advances in the chemistry of inks for TIJ printing and today, this technology is proving to be very successful at printing onto the non-porous substrates used for protein packaging.

The ink cartridges used in thermal inkjet printers ensure that there is no need to have to deal with the MEK and other solvents used in other print technologies, such as CIJ. There is no need to deal with disposing of partially used ink or additive bottles.

With no cleaning cycle needed at startup or shutdown, a thermal inkjet printer is always ready to work.

The thermal inkjet coders provided by ProMach brands, Code Tech & ID Technology, are designed to be able to get the job done in these areas. They bring all the advantages of the thermal inkjet system but include models that are available in IP65 versions, perfect for producing excellent code quality every time, regardless of the environment.

 

Reduce Maintenance & Downtime

A thermal impact printer uses familiar HP type ink cartridges. This means that every time you change the cartridge, you effectively get a new printer.

As a bonus, should you need to change the color of your print, this is accomplished by simply replacing the ink cartridge with one of the required color.

Our TIJ printers come in versions that are built to IP65 environmental protection. This means that regardless of how dirty or wet the packaging environment, the printers will operate happily.

Exceptional Print Quality

With print resolutions of up to 600×600 DPI, thermal inkjet produces perfect prints every time, even when printing very small fonts or high-density barcodes.

Inks are available that are fast drying and durable to suit just about every packaging material.

Quick and Simple Installation and Integration

Thermal inkjet printers from ID Technology and Code Tech have a small footprint, making them easy to install in your parent packaging machine, even when multiple heads are needed.

Combined with the web handling and printer traversing expertise of the Greydon brand, printers from ProMach Labeling & Coding can be integrated with every type of flexible packaging machine.

Is TIJ Always the Best Technology to Use?

No, not always.

Thermal inkjet brings some important advantages, but there are times where an alternative technology such as CIJ printing, thermal transfer, laser or ink stamping might make sense. We happen to sell a complete range of coding technologies so we can work with you to help decide which is best for your unique needs.

Want to Get Started?

How can you start improving your own packaging coding? Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3. You can also email me at dholliday@idtechnology.com We’ll get you in touch with one of our local experts right away.

[post_excerpt] => Regardless of package type, companies that produce meat or poultry products need to add variable information to the package. This includes date and lot codes, establishment codes, regulatory agency logos, and increasingly barcodes. In many industries, this is quite straightforward, but for protein companies, there is the added complication of the environment in which coding […] [post_date_gmt] => 2019-08-07 14:47:49 [post_date] => 2019-08-07 14:47:49 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-08-07 14:47:49 [post_modified] => 2019-08-07 14:47:49 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => http://www.labelingnews.com/?p=5958 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Labeling News [syndication_source_uri] => http://www.labelingnews.com [syndication_source_id] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed_id] => 12 [syndication_permalink] => http://www.labelingnews.com/2019/08/product-coding-for-protein-producers/ [syndication_item_hash] => bf79e38cb1b9f7707482459ba38d1477 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 1625 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

Doing filter:faf_image_filter

Execute image filter

Image process

Local save:http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/washdown-codetech.jpg

Image process :: Saving local image

grab remote location : http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/washdown-codetech.jpg

Image exists, checking for same file size

Replacing images : inkjet printing for protein companies - inkjet printing for protein companies ON

Regardless of package type, companies that produce meat or poultry products need to add variable information to the package. This includes date and lot codes, establishment codes, regulatory agency logos, and increasingly barcodes.

In many industries, this is quite straightforward, but for protein companies, there is the added complication of the environment in which coding and packaging equipment has to operate. Cold and wet conditions are the norm and any equipment brought into the plants needs to be able to handle this as well as washdown situations.

Traditionally continuous inkjet (CIJ) printers have been used for printing variable information onto meat and poultry packaging. These printers can usually handle the harsh conditions found on the packaging lines and also produce the print quality that is good enough for the applications. Thermal inkjet (TIJ) printers have not been used in the past due to the inks being unsuitable for use on the films used for the packaging.

inkjet printing for protein companies

Over the last few years, however, there have been great advances in the chemistry of inks for TIJ printing and today, this technology is proving to be very successful at printing onto the non-porous substrates used for protein packaging.

The ink cartridges used in thermal inkjet printers ensure that there is no need to have to deal with the MEK and other solvents used in other print technologies, such as CIJ. There is no need to deal with disposing of partially used ink or additive bottles.

With no cleaning cycle needed at startup or shutdown, a thermal inkjet printer is always ready to work.

The thermal inkjet coders provided by ProMach brands, Code Tech & ID Technology, are designed to be able to get the job done in these areas. They bring all the advantages of the thermal inkjet system but include models that are available in IP65 versions, perfect for producing excellent code quality every time, regardless of the environment.

 

Reduce Maintenance & Downtime

A thermal impact printer uses familiar HP type ink cartridges. This means that every time you change the cartridge, you effectively get a new printer.

As a bonus, should you need to change the color of your print, this is accomplished by simply replacing the ink cartridge with one of the required color.

Our TIJ printers come in versions that are built to IP65 environmental protection. This means that regardless of how dirty or wet the packaging environment, the printers will operate happily.

Exceptional Print Quality

With print resolutions of up to 600×600 DPI, thermal inkjet produces perfect prints every time, even when printing very small fonts or high-density barcodes.

Inks are available that are fast drying and durable to suit just about every packaging material.

Quick and Simple Installation and Integration

Thermal inkjet printers from ID Technology and Code Tech have a small footprint, making them easy to install in your parent packaging machine, even when multiple heads are needed.

Combined with the web handling and printer traversing expertise of the Greydon brand, printers from ProMach Labeling & Coding can be integrated with every type of flexible packaging machine.

Is TIJ Always the Best Technology to Use?

No, not always.

Thermal inkjet brings some important advantages, but there are times where an alternative technology such as CIJ printing, thermal transfer, laser or ink stamping might make sense. We happen to sell a complete range of coding technologies so we can work with you to help decide which is best for your unique needs.

Want to Get Started?

How can you start improving your own packaging coding? Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3. You can also email me at dholliday@idtechnology.com We’ll get you in touch with one of our local experts right away.

Local save:http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/tij-protein-samples.jpg

Image process :: Saving local image

grab remote location : http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/tij-protein-samples.jpg

Image exists, checking for same file size

Replacing images : - ON

Regardless of package type, companies that produce meat or poultry products need to add variable information to the package. This includes date and lot codes, establishment codes, regulatory agency logos, and increasingly barcodes.

In many industries, this is quite straightforward, but for protein companies, there is the added complication of the environment in which coding and packaging equipment has to operate. Cold and wet conditions are the norm and any equipment brought into the plants needs to be able to handle this as well as washdown situations.

Traditionally continuous inkjet (CIJ) printers have been used for printing variable information onto meat and poultry packaging. These printers can usually handle the harsh conditions found on the packaging lines and also produce the print quality that is good enough for the applications. Thermal inkjet (TIJ) printers have not been used in the past due to the inks being unsuitable for use on the films used for the packaging.

Product Coding for Protein Producers

Over the last few years, however, there have been great advances in the chemistry of inks for TIJ printing and today, this technology is proving to be very successful at printing onto the non-porous substrates used for protein packaging.

The ink cartridges used in thermal inkjet printers ensure that there is no need to have to deal with the MEK and other solvents used in other print technologies, such as CIJ. There is no need to deal with disposing of partially used ink or additive bottles.

With no cleaning cycle needed at startup or shutdown, a thermal inkjet printer is always ready to work.

The thermal inkjet coders provided by ProMach brands, Code Tech & ID Technology, are designed to be able to get the job done in these areas. They bring all the advantages of the thermal inkjet system but include models that are available in IP65 versions, perfect for producing excellent code quality every time, regardless of the environment.

 

Reduce Maintenance & Downtime

A thermal impact printer uses familiar HP type ink cartridges. This means that every time you change the cartridge, you effectively get a new printer.

As a bonus, should you need to change the color of your print, this is accomplished by simply replacing the ink cartridge with one of the required color.

Our TIJ printers come in versions that are built to IP65 environmental protection. This means that regardless of how dirty or wet the packaging environment, the printers will operate happily.

Exceptional Print Quality

With print resolutions of up to 600×600 DPI, thermal inkjet produces perfect prints every time, even when printing very small fonts or high-density barcodes.

Inks are available that are fast drying and durable to suit just about every packaging material.

Quick and Simple Installation and Integration

Thermal inkjet printers from ID Technology and Code Tech have a small footprint, making them easy to install in your parent packaging machine, even when multiple heads are needed.

Combined with the web handling and printer traversing expertise of the Greydon brand, printers from ProMach Labeling & Coding can be integrated with every type of flexible packaging machine.

Is TIJ Always the Best Technology to Use?

No, not always.

Thermal inkjet brings some important advantages, but there are times where an alternative technology such as CIJ printing, thermal transfer, laser or ink stamping might make sense. We happen to sell a complete range of coding technologies so we can work with you to help decide which is best for your unique needs.

Want to Get Started?

How can you start improving your own packaging coding? Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3. You can also email me at dholliday@idtechnology.com We’ll get you in touch with one of our local experts right away.

Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Labeling News [syndication_source_uri] => http://www.labelingnews.com [syndication_source_id] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed_id] => 12 [syndication_permalink] => http://www.labelingnews.com/2019/08/product-coding-for-protein-producers/ [syndication_item_hash] => bf79e38cb1b9f7707482459ba38d1477 )

Execute : Enclosure images

Enclosure save:

Array ( [0] => )

No match on

Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :Product Coding for Protein Producers

Array ( [post_title] => Product Coding for Protein Producers [post_content] =>

Regardless of package type, companies that produce meat or poultry products need to add variable information to the package. This includes date and lot codes, establishment codes, regulatory agency logos, and increasingly barcodes.

In many industries, this is quite straightforward, but for protein companies, there is the added complication of the environment in which coding and packaging equipment has to operate. Cold and wet conditions are the norm and any equipment brought into the plants needs to be able to handle this as well as washdown situations.

Traditionally continuous inkjet (CIJ) printers have been used for printing variable information onto meat and poultry packaging. These printers can usually handle the harsh conditions found on the packaging lines and also produce the print quality that is good enough for the applications. Thermal inkjet (TIJ) printers have not been used in the past due to the inks being unsuitable for use on the films used for the packaging.

Product Coding for Protein Producers

Over the last few years, however, there have been great advances in the chemistry of inks for TIJ printing and today, this technology is proving to be very successful at printing onto the non-porous substrates used for protein packaging.Product Coding for Protein Producers

The ink cartridges used in thermal inkjet printers ensure that there is no need to have to deal with the MEK and other solvents used in other print technologies, such as CIJ. There is no need to deal with disposing of partially used ink or additive bottles.

With no cleaning cycle needed at startup or shutdown, a thermal inkjet printer is always ready to work.

The thermal inkjet coders provided by ProMach brands, Code Tech & ID Technology, are designed to be able to get the job done in these areas. They bring all the advantages of the thermal inkjet system but include models that are available in IP65 versions, perfect for producing excellent code quality every time, regardless of the environment.

 

Reduce Maintenance & Downtime

A thermal impact printer uses familiar HP type ink cartridges. This means that every time you change the cartridge, you effectively get a new printer.

As a bonus, should you need to change the color of your print, this is accomplished by simply replacing the ink cartridge with one of the required color.

Our TIJ printers come in versions that are built to IP65 environmental protection. This means that regardless of how dirty or wet the packaging environment, the printers will operate happily.

Exceptional Print Quality

With print resolutions of up to 600×600 DPI, thermal inkjet produces perfect prints every time, even when printing very small fonts or high-density barcodes.

Inks are available that are fast drying and durable to suit just about every packaging material.

Quick and Simple Installation and Integration

Thermal inkjet printers from ID Technology and Code Tech have a small footprint, making them easy to install in your parent packaging machine, even when multiple heads are needed.

Combined with the web handling and printer traversing expertise of the Greydon brand, printers from ProMach Labeling & Coding can be integrated with every type of flexible packaging machine.

Is TIJ Always the Best Technology to Use?

No, not always.

Thermal inkjet brings some important advantages, but there are times where an alternative technology such as CIJ printing, thermal transfer, laser or ink stamping might make sense. We happen to sell a complete range of coding technologies so we can work with you to help decide which is best for your unique needs.

Want to Get Started?

How can you start improving your own packaging coding? Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3. You can also email me at dholliday@idtechnology.com We’ll get you in touch with one of our local experts right away.

[post_excerpt] => Regardless of package type, companies that produce meat or poultry products need to add variable information to the package. This includes date and lot codes, establishment codes, regulatory agency logos, and increasingly barcodes. In many industries, this is quite straightforward, but for protein companies, there is the added complication of the environment in which coding […] [post_date_gmt] => 2019-08-07 14:47:49 [post_date] => 2019-08-07 14:47:49 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-08-07 14:47:49 [post_modified] => 2019-08-07 14:47:49 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => http://www.labelingnews.com/?p=5958 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Labeling News [syndication_source_uri] => http://www.labelingnews.com [syndication_source_id] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed_id] => 12 [syndication_permalink] => http://www.labelingnews.com/2019/08/product-coding-for-protein-producers/ [syndication_item_hash] => bf79e38cb1b9f7707482459ba38d1477 [faf_featured_image] => 0 [faf_process_image] => 0,0 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 1625 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

FAF deciding on filters on post to be syndicated:

Customer Engagement and More – GS1 Digital Link

Array ( [post_title] => Customer Engagement and More – GS1 Digital Link [post_content] =>

Using barcodes on packages for customer engagement? This idea is certainly not new – here is a link to a Packaging World article on this very topic from 2011.

The article specifically mentioned that QR codes would provide the ability to download coupons, enter contests, play games, and other fun activities – all powered by those little barcodes.

This all seemed quite exciting, but QR codes got old quickly and the concept seemed to fade away.

Fast forward to today and there is renewed interest in using packaging to actively engage with customers.

Listen to our GS1 Digital Link Podcast

Traditional ways to communicate to customers such as TV and print advertising are not performing as well as In the past.  These are also a one-way form of communication, yelling a message at consumers – no wonder they don’t work as well as in the past. In addition, engagement on a brand’s social media pages is in decline as well. What is a marketer to do?

As a result of all this, brand owners have a renewed interest trying to set up a direct connection to their customers based on the product packaging – the package is potentially the ultimate marketing tool.
Enter smart packaging – a means to allow brands to connect directly with their customers. Generally, a smart package will allow the customer to scan a barcode (yes, usually a QR Code) and be connected to an interactive website.

So QR codes are back – a lot of brands are using them – some quite creatively

Currently, there isn’t a standard to use QR codes  (or any type of barcode) for customer engagement so brands are tending to encode them in different ways – often just a URL, sometimes other data.
Of course, the package’s UPC  barcode still needs to be there so most items would have to have multiple barcodes – rather messy and takes up more space on the package.
The product UPC codes scanned at the point of sale haven’t really changed in the 45 years since the concept was introduced.

Wouldn’t it be great if, rather than have multiple barcodes on a package, a single one could contain the UPC data, weblink for customer engagement? Maybe we can!

Last year GS1 our favorite standards organization came out with a new concept: GS1 Digital Link.

While the name might not be too exciting, Digital Link has the potential to revolutionize how barcoding is used, to add true customer engagement and to (yes really) provide item-level serialization and traceability.
For primary packaging (what we would buy in a store), GS1’s barcoding is built around the concept of the Global Trade Item Number – GTIN. This is what is encoded in the common UPC barcode that is scanned at the checkout.
The GTIN in the item barcode basically consists of a company prefix and an SKU or stock keeping unit number. The GTIN identifies a type of product – a 12oz can of Pepsi Cola or an 8 oz bag of salt n vinegar Lay’s chips for example. Every item sold at retail and many other products that use the GS1 system (such as pharmaceutical or medical products) has a GTIN.
It is important to note that a GTIN doesn’t identify an individual item – every 12oz can of Pepsi will have the same GTIN.
Also, no additional data can be encoded in the product barcode – only the 12 digit UPC in the US or 13 digit EAN code internationally. This is why additional barcodes must currently be added to a package in the event a brand owner wants to encode more data.
Traditionally, barcodes in the GS1 system have been used in the supply chain from manufacturer to point of sale. They lose their usefulness once the product has been sold. GS1 Digital Link promises to extend the reach of the GS1 system all the way from the manufacturer to consumer and to provide a means of interaction between the brand owner and the consumer.

So how does it work?

For the first time, GS1 is allowing a 2D QR barcode to be used as the barcode for point of sale.
Encoded within the barcode is a URI (unique resource identifier – an example of which is the familiar website URLs we use every day) and a number of other possible data fields that include:
GTIN
Lot number
Serial number
The expiration date and many more
Some examples:
Note, the examples use the domain id.gs1.org, but brand owners can use their own domains.
An interesting addition to the new specification is that the data fields can be identified by either using the familiar GS1 Application Identifiers (AI) or by text identifiers. Note that this is only a quick intro, so check out the GS1 Digital Link specification to get complete information.
  The ability to include all this data in one barcode means that only one barcode needs to be printed on the package and it can be used for point of sale, traceability, anti-counterfeit and for customer engagement by sending a consumer who scans the code to an interactive website.
GS1 Digital Link could prove to be the biggest revolution in barcoding since the first code was scanned in a store 45 years ago.

When will this start?

It is going to take a while and we can expect to see both traditional UPC codes and the new QR codes used side by side until the infrastructure is in place to handle the new 2D barcodes.
 A survey carried out by the food marketing institute found that in the US nearly 40% of POS scanners are capable of reading 2D codes today and that will increase to about 55% by 2022.
The POS systems to handle the data are running somewhat behind, with an estimated 20% of systems being able to handle this data.
There is clearly a ways to go.
In the same survey, stakeholders saw the advantages of switching to data-rich solutions such as follows:
60% stated better inventory accuracy
40% stated better customer engagement
36% stated anti-counterfeit
35% stated improved recall control
33% stated expiration date control
* Yes, people could choose more than one.
Finally, 85% of stakeholders see 3-5 years to get a higher data density solution to the current UPC established.
So there is certainly a lot of interest in GS1 Digital Link. While I’ve discussed the use of QR codes in this podcast, other data carriers that could be used (and be very interesting) are NFC RFID tags and the Digimarc system that turns the complete package into the barcode. Digimarc will be the topic of a future podcast.
Should be interesting days ahead.
How can we help you meet your objectives for your labeling and barcode operations? Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3. You can also email me at dholliday@idtechnology.com. We’ll be sure to get you in touch with an expert, right in your area!
[post_excerpt] => Using barcodes on packages for customer engagement? This idea is certainly not new – here is a link to a Packaging World article on this very topic from 2011. The article specifically mentioned that QR codes would provide the ability to download coupons, enter contests, play games, and other fun activities – all powered by […] [post_date_gmt] => 2019-08-05 18:10:41 [post_date] => 2019-08-05 18:10:41 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-08-05 18:10:41 [post_modified] => 2019-08-05 18:10:41 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => http://www.labelingnews.com/?p=5952 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Labeling News [syndication_source_uri] => http://www.labelingnews.com [syndication_source_id] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed_id] => 12 [syndication_permalink] => http://www.labelingnews.com/2019/08/customer-engagement-and-more-gs1-digital-link/ [syndication_item_hash] => 1e5148b5aacb103170db86cec5f4b5cf ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 1625 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

Doing filter:faf_image_filter

Execute image filter

Image process

Local save:http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/GS1DL-HEADER.jpg

Image process :: Saving local image

grab remote location : http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/GS1DL-HEADER.jpg

Image exists, checking for same file size

Replacing images : - ON

Using barcodes on packages for customer engagement? This idea is certainly not new – here is a link to a Packaging World article on this very topic from 2011.

The article specifically mentioned that QR codes would provide the ability to download coupons, enter contests, play games, and other fun activities – all powered by those little barcodes.

This all seemed quite exciting, but QR codes got old quickly and the concept seemed to fade away.

Fast forward to today and there is renewed interest in using packaging to actively engage with customers.

Listen to our GS1 Digital Link Podcast

Traditional ways to communicate to customers such as TV and print advertising are not performing as well as In the past.  These are also a one-way form of communication, yelling a message at consumers – no wonder they don’t work as well as in the past. In addition, engagement on a brand’s social media pages is in decline as well. What is a marketer to do?

As a result of all this, brand owners have a renewed interest trying to set up a direct connection to their customers based on the product packaging – the package is potentially the ultimate marketing tool.
Enter smart packaging – a means to allow brands to connect directly with their customers. Generally, a smart package will allow the customer to scan a barcode (yes, usually a QR Code) and be connected to an interactive website.

So QR codes are back – a lot of brands are using them – some quite creatively

Currently, there isn’t a standard to use QR codes  (or any type of barcode) for customer engagement so brands are tending to encode them in different ways – often just a URL, sometimes other data.
Of course, the package’s UPC  barcode still needs to be there so most items would have to have multiple barcodes – rather messy and takes up more space on the package.
The product UPC codes scanned at the point of sale haven’t really changed in the 45 years since the concept was introduced.

Wouldn’t it be great if, rather than have multiple barcodes on a package, a single one could contain the UPC data, weblink for customer engagement? Maybe we can!

Last year GS1 our favorite standards organization came out with a new concept: GS1 Digital Link.

While the name might not be too exciting, Digital Link has the potential to revolutionize how barcoding is used, to add true customer engagement and to (yes really) provide item-level serialization and traceability.
For primary packaging (what we would buy in a store), GS1’s barcoding is built around the concept of the Global Trade Item Number – GTIN. This is what is encoded in the common UPC barcode that is scanned at the checkout.
The GTIN in the item barcode basically consists of a company prefix and an SKU or stock keeping unit number. The GTIN identifies a type of product – a 12oz can of Pepsi Cola or an 8 oz bag of salt n vinegar Lay’s chips for example. Every item sold at retail and many other products that use the GS1 system (such as pharmaceutical or medical products) has a GTIN.
It is important to note that a GTIN doesn’t identify an individual item – every 12oz can of Pepsi will have the same GTIN.
Also, no additional data can be encoded in the product barcode – only the 12 digit UPC in the US or 13 digit EAN code internationally. This is why additional barcodes must currently be added to a package in the event a brand owner wants to encode more data.
Traditionally, barcodes in the GS1 system have been used in the supply chain from manufacturer to point of sale. They lose their usefulness once the product has been sold. GS1 Digital Link promises to extend the reach of the GS1 system all the way from the manufacturer to consumer and to provide a means of interaction between the brand owner and the consumer.

So how does it work?

For the first time, GS1 is allowing a 2D QR barcode to be used as the barcode for point of sale.
Encoded within the barcode is a URI (unique resource identifier – an example of which is the familiar website URLs we use every day) and a number of other possible data fields that include:
GTIN
Lot number
Serial number
The expiration date and many more
Some examples:
Note, the examples use the domain id.gs1.org, but brand owners can use their own domains.
An interesting addition to the new specification is that the data fields can be identified by either using the familiar GS1 Application Identifiers (AI) or by text identifiers. Note that this is only a quick intro, so check out the GS1 Digital Link specification to get complete information.
  The ability to include all this data in one barcode means that only one barcode needs to be printed on the package and it can be used for point of sale, traceability, anti-counterfeit and for customer engagement by sending a consumer who scans the code to an interactive website.
GS1 Digital Link could prove to be the biggest revolution in barcoding since the first code was scanned in a store 45 years ago.

When will this start?

It is going to take a while and we can expect to see both traditional UPC codes and the new QR codes used side by side until the infrastructure is in place to handle the new 2D barcodes.
 A survey carried out by the food marketing institute found that in the US nearly 40% of POS scanners are capable of reading 2D codes today and that will increase to about 55% by 2022.
The POS systems to handle the data are running somewhat behind, with an estimated 20% of systems being able to handle this data.
There is clearly a ways to go.
In the same survey, stakeholders saw the advantages of switching to data-rich solutions such as follows:
60% stated better inventory accuracy
40% stated better customer engagement
36% stated anti-counterfeit
35% stated improved recall control
33% stated expiration date control
* Yes, people could choose more than one.
Finally, 85% of stakeholders see 3-5 years to get a higher data density solution to the current UPC established.
So there is certainly a lot of interest in GS1 Digital Link. While I’ve discussed the use of QR codes in this podcast, other data carriers that could be used (and be very interesting) are NFC RFID tags and the Digimarc system that turns the complete package into the barcode. Digimarc will be the topic of a future podcast.
Should be interesting days ahead.
How can we help you meet your objectives for your labeling and barcode operations? Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3. You can also email me at dholliday@idtechnology.com. We’ll be sure to get you in touch with an expert, right in your area!

Local save:http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/LNPodcastImage-150x150.jpg

Image process :: Saving local image

grab remote location : http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/LNPodcastImage-150x150.jpg

Image exists, checking for same file size

Replacing images : - ON

Customer Engagement and More – GS1 Digital Link

Using barcodes on packages for customer engagement? This idea is certainly not new – here is a link to a Packaging World article on this very topic from 2011.

The article specifically mentioned that QR codes would provide the ability to download coupons, enter contests, play games, and other fun activities – all powered by those little barcodes.

This all seemed quite exciting, but QR codes got old quickly and the concept seemed to fade away.

Fast forward to today and there is renewed interest in using packaging to actively engage with customers.

Listen to our GS1 Digital Link Podcast

Traditional ways to communicate to customers such as TV and print advertising are not performing as well as In the past.  These are also a one-way form of communication, yelling a message at consumers – no wonder they don’t work as well as in the past. In addition, engagement on a brand’s social media pages is in decline as well. What is a marketer to do?

As a result of all this, brand owners have a renewed interest trying to set up a direct connection to their customers based on the product packaging – the package is potentially the ultimate marketing tool.
Enter smart packaging – a means to allow brands to connect directly with their customers. Generally, a smart package will allow the customer to scan a barcode (yes, usually a QR Code) and be connected to an interactive website.

So QR codes are back – a lot of brands are using them – some quite creatively

Currently, there isn’t a standard to use QR codes  (or any type of barcode) for customer engagement so brands are tending to encode them in different ways – often just a URL, sometimes other data.
Of course, the package’s UPC  barcode still needs to be there so most items would have to have multiple barcodes – rather messy and takes up more space on the package.
The product UPC codes scanned at the point of sale haven’t really changed in the 45 years since the concept was introduced.

Wouldn’t it be great if, rather than have multiple barcodes on a package, a single one could contain the UPC data, weblink for customer engagement? Maybe we can!

Last year GS1 our favorite standards organization came out with a new concept: GS1 Digital Link.

While the name might not be too exciting, Digital Link has the potential to revolutionize how barcoding is used, to add true customer engagement and to (yes really) provide item-level serialization and traceability.
For primary packaging (what we would buy in a store), GS1’s barcoding is built around the concept of the Global Trade Item Number – GTIN. This is what is encoded in the common UPC barcode that is scanned at the checkout.
The GTIN in the item barcode basically consists of a company prefix and an SKU or stock keeping unit number. The GTIN identifies a type of product – a 12oz can of Pepsi Cola or an 8 oz bag of salt n vinegar Lay’s chips for example. Every item sold at retail and many other products that use the GS1 system (such as pharmaceutical or medical products) has a GTIN.
It is important to note that a GTIN doesn’t identify an individual item – every 12oz can of Pepsi will have the same GTIN.
Also, no additional data can be encoded in the product barcode – only the 12 digit UPC in the US or 13 digit EAN code internationally. This is why additional barcodes must currently be added to a package in the event a brand owner wants to encode more data.
Traditionally, barcodes in the GS1 system have been used in the supply chain from manufacturer to point of sale. They lose their usefulness once the product has been sold. GS1 Digital Link promises to extend the reach of the GS1 system all the way from the manufacturer to consumer and to provide a means of interaction between the brand owner and the consumer.

So how does it work?

For the first time, GS1 is allowing a 2D QR barcode to be used as the barcode for point of sale.
Encoded within the barcode is a URI (unique resource identifier – an example of which is the familiar website URLs we use every day) and a number of other possible data fields that include:
GTIN
Lot number
Serial number
The expiration date and many more
Some examples:
Note, the examples use the domain id.gs1.org, but brand owners can use their own domains.
An interesting addition to the new specification is that the data fields can be identified by either using the familiar GS1 Application Identifiers (AI) or by text identifiers. Note that this is only a quick intro, so check out the GS1 Digital Link specification to get complete information.
  The ability to include all this data in one barcode means that only one barcode needs to be printed on the package and it can be used for point of sale, traceability, anti-counterfeit and for customer engagement by sending a consumer who scans the code to an interactive website.
GS1 Digital Link could prove to be the biggest revolution in barcoding since the first code was scanned in a store 45 years ago.

When will this start?

It is going to take a while and we can expect to see both traditional UPC codes and the new QR codes used side by side until the infrastructure is in place to handle the new 2D barcodes.
 A survey carried out by the food marketing institute found that in the US nearly 40% of POS scanners are capable of reading 2D codes today and that will increase to about 55% by 2022.
The POS systems to handle the data are running somewhat behind, with an estimated 20% of systems being able to handle this data.
There is clearly a ways to go.
In the same survey, stakeholders saw the advantages of switching to data-rich solutions such as follows:
60% stated better inventory accuracy
40% stated better customer engagement
36% stated anti-counterfeit
35% stated improved recall control
33% stated expiration date control
* Yes, people could choose more than one.
Finally, 85% of stakeholders see 3-5 years to get a higher data density solution to the current UPC established.
So there is certainly a lot of interest in GS1 Digital Link. While I’ve discussed the use of QR codes in this podcast, other data carriers that could be used (and be very interesting) are NFC RFID tags and the Digimarc system that turns the complete package into the barcode. Digimarc will be the topic of a future podcast.
Should be interesting days ahead.
How can we help you meet your objectives for your labeling and barcode operations? Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3. You can also email me at dholliday@idtechnology.com. We’ll be sure to get you in touch with an expert, right in your area!

Local save:http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/GS1DL-gtin.jpg

Image process :: Saving local image

grab remote location : http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/GS1DL-gtin.jpg

Image exists, checking for same file size

Replacing images : - ON

Customer Engagement and More – GS1 Digital Link

Using barcodes on packages for customer engagement? This idea is certainly not new – here is a link to a Packaging World article on this very topic from 2011.

The article specifically mentioned that QR codes would provide the ability to download coupons, enter contests, play games, and other fun activities – all powered by those little barcodes.

This all seemed quite exciting, but QR codes got old quickly and the concept seemed to fade away.

Fast forward to today and there is renewed interest in using packaging to actively engage with customers.

Customer Engagement and More – GS1 Digital Link

Listen to our GS1 Digital Link Podcast

Traditional ways to communicate to customers such as TV and print advertising are not performing as well as In the past.  These are also a one-way form of communication, yelling a message at consumers – no wonder they don’t work as well as in the past. In addition, engagement on a brand’s social media pages is in decline as well. What is a marketer to do?

As a result of all this, brand owners have a renewed interest trying to set up a direct connection to their customers based on the product packaging – the package is potentially the ultimate marketing tool.
Enter smart packaging – a means to allow brands to connect directly with their customers. Generally, a smart package will allow the customer to scan a barcode (yes, usually a QR Code) and be connected to an interactive website.

So QR codes are back – a lot of brands are using them – some quite creatively

Currently, there isn’t a standard to use QR codes  (or any type of barcode) for customer engagement so brands are tending to encode them in different ways – often just a URL, sometimes other data.
Of course, the package’s UPC  barcode still needs to be there so most items would have to have multiple barcodes – rather messy and takes up more space on the package.
The product UPC codes scanned at the point of sale haven’t really changed in the 45 years since the concept was introduced.

Wouldn’t it be great if, rather than have multiple barcodes on a package, a single one could contain the UPC data, weblink for customer engagement? Maybe we can!

Last year GS1 our favorite standards organization came out with a new concept: GS1 Digital Link.

While the name might not be too exciting, Digital Link has the potential to revolutionize how barcoding is used, to add true customer engagement and to (yes really) provide item-level serialization and traceability.
For primary packaging (what we would buy in a store), GS1’s barcoding is built around the concept of the Global Trade Item Number – GTIN. This is what is encoded in the common UPC barcode that is scanned at the checkout.
The GTIN in the item barcode basically consists of a company prefix and an SKU or stock keeping unit number. The GTIN identifies a type of product – a 12oz can of Pepsi Cola or an 8 oz bag of salt n vinegar Lay’s chips for example. Every item sold at retail and many other products that use the GS1 system (such as pharmaceutical or medical products) has a GTIN.
It is important to note that a GTIN doesn’t identify an individual item – every 12oz can of Pepsi will have the same GTIN.
Also, no additional data can be encoded in the product barcode – only the 12 digit UPC in the US or 13 digit EAN code internationally. This is why additional barcodes must currently be added to a package in the event a brand owner wants to encode more data.
Traditionally, barcodes in the GS1 system have been used in the supply chain from manufacturer to point of sale. They lose their usefulness once the product has been sold. GS1 Digital Link promises to extend the reach of the GS1 system all the way from the manufacturer to consumer and to provide a means of interaction between the brand owner and the consumer.

So how does it work?

For the first time, GS1 is allowing a 2D QR barcode to be used as the barcode for point of sale.
Encoded within the barcode is a URI (unique resource identifier – an example of which is the familiar website URLs we use every day) and a number of other possible data fields that include:
GTIN
Lot number
Serial number
The expiration date and many more
Some examples:
Note, the examples use the domain id.gs1.org, but brand owners can use their own domains.
An interesting addition to the new specification is that the data fields can be identified by either using the familiar GS1 Application Identifiers (AI) or by text identifiers. Note that this is only a quick intro, so check out the GS1 Digital Link specification to get complete information.
  The ability to include all this data in one barcode means that only one barcode needs to be printed on the package and it can be used for point of sale, traceability, anti-counterfeit and for customer engagement by sending a consumer who scans the code to an interactive website.
GS1 Digital Link could prove to be the biggest revolution in barcoding since the first code was scanned in a store 45 years ago.

When will this start?

It is going to take a while and we can expect to see both traditional UPC codes and the new QR codes used side by side until the infrastructure is in place to handle the new 2D barcodes.
 A survey carried out by the food marketing institute found that in the US nearly 40% of POS scanners are capable of reading 2D codes today and that will increase to about 55% by 2022.
The POS systems to handle the data are running somewhat behind, with an estimated 20% of systems being able to handle this data.
There is clearly a ways to go.
In the same survey, stakeholders saw the advantages of switching to data-rich solutions such as follows:
60% stated better inventory accuracy
40% stated better customer engagement
36% stated anti-counterfeit
35% stated improved recall control
33% stated expiration date control
* Yes, people could choose more than one.
Finally, 85% of stakeholders see 3-5 years to get a higher data density solution to the current UPC established.
So there is certainly a lot of interest in GS1 Digital Link. While I’ve discussed the use of QR codes in this podcast, other data carriers that could be used (and be very interesting) are NFC RFID tags and the Digimarc system that turns the complete package into the barcode. Digimarc will be the topic of a future podcast.
Should be interesting days ahead.
How can we help you meet your objectives for your labeling and barcode operations? Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3. You can also email me at dholliday@idtechnology.com. We’ll be sure to get you in touch with an expert, right in your area!

Local save:http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/GS1DL-sgtin.jpg

Image process :: Saving local image

grab remote location : http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/GS1DL-sgtin.jpg

Image exists, checking for same file size

Replacing images : - ON

Customer Engagement and More – GS1 Digital Link

Using barcodes on packages for customer engagement? This idea is certainly not new – here is a link to a Packaging World article on this very topic from 2011.

The article specifically mentioned that QR codes would provide the ability to download coupons, enter contests, play games, and other fun activities – all powered by those little barcodes.

This all seemed quite exciting, but QR codes got old quickly and the concept seemed to fade away.

Fast forward to today and there is renewed interest in using packaging to actively engage with customers.

Customer Engagement and More – GS1 Digital Link

Listen to our GS1 Digital Link Podcast

Traditional ways to communicate to customers such as TV and print advertising are not performing as well as In the past.  These are also a one-way form of communication, yelling a message at consumers – no wonder they don’t work as well as in the past. In addition, engagement on a brand’s social media pages is in decline as well. What is a marketer to do?

As a result of all this, brand owners have a renewed interest trying to set up a direct connection to their customers based on the product packaging – the package is potentially the ultimate marketing tool.
Enter smart packaging – a means to allow brands to connect directly with their customers. Generally, a smart package will allow the customer to scan a barcode (yes, usually a QR Code) and be connected to an interactive website.

So QR codes are back – a lot of brands are using them – some quite creatively

Currently, there isn’t a standard to use QR codes  (or any type of barcode) for customer engagement so brands are tending to encode them in different ways – often just a URL, sometimes other data.
Of course, the package’s UPC  barcode still needs to be there so most items would have to have multiple barcodes – rather messy and takes up more space on the package.
The product UPC codes scanned at the point of sale haven’t really changed in the 45 years since the concept was introduced.

Wouldn’t it be great if, rather than have multiple barcodes on a package, a single one could contain the UPC data, weblink for customer engagement? Maybe we can!

Last year GS1 our favorite standards organization came out with a new concept: GS1 Digital Link.

While the name might not be too exciting, Digital Link has the potential to revolutionize how barcoding is used, to add true customer engagement and to (yes really) provide item-level serialization and traceability.
For primary packaging (what we would buy in a store), GS1’s barcoding is built around the concept of the Global Trade Item Number – GTIN. This is what is encoded in the common UPC barcode that is scanned at the checkout.
The GTIN in the item barcode basically consists of a company prefix and an SKU or stock keeping unit number. The GTIN identifies a type of product – a 12oz can of Pepsi Cola or an 8 oz bag of salt n vinegar Lay’s chips for example. Every item sold at retail and many other products that use the GS1 system (such as pharmaceutical or medical products) has a GTIN.
It is important to note that a GTIN doesn’t identify an individual item – every 12oz can of Pepsi will have the same GTIN.
Also, no additional data can be encoded in the product barcode – only the 12 digit UPC in the US or 13 digit EAN code internationally. This is why additional barcodes must currently be added to a package in the event a brand owner wants to encode more data.
Traditionally, barcodes in the GS1 system have been used in the supply chain from manufacturer to point of sale. They lose their usefulness once the product has been sold. GS1 Digital Link promises to extend the reach of the GS1 system all the way from the manufacturer to consumer and to provide a means of interaction between the brand owner and the consumer.

So how does it work?

For the first time, GS1 is allowing a 2D QR barcode to be used as the barcode for point of sale.
Encoded within the barcode is a URI (unique resource identifier – an example of which is the familiar website URLs we use every day) and a number of other possible data fields that include:
GTIN
Lot number
Serial number
The expiration date and many more
Some examples:
Note, the examples use the domain id.gs1.org, but brand owners can use their own domains.
Customer Engagement and More – GS1 Digital Link
An interesting addition to the new specification is that the data fields can be identified by either using the familiar GS1 Application Identifiers (AI) or by text identifiers. Note that this is only a quick intro, so check out the GS1 Digital Link specification to get complete information.
  The ability to include all this data in one barcode means that only one barcode needs to be printed on the package and it can be used for point of sale, traceability, anti-counterfeit and for customer engagement by sending a consumer who scans the code to an interactive website.
GS1 Digital Link could prove to be the biggest revolution in barcoding since the first code was scanned in a store 45 years ago.

When will this start?

It is going to take a while and we can expect to see both traditional UPC codes and the new QR codes used side by side until the infrastructure is in place to handle the new 2D barcodes.
 A survey carried out by the food marketing institute found that in the US nearly 40% of POS scanners are capable of reading 2D codes today and that will increase to about 55% by 2022.
The POS systems to handle the data are running somewhat behind, with an estimated 20% of systems being able to handle this data.
There is clearly a ways to go.
In the same survey, stakeholders saw the advantages of switching to data-rich solutions such as follows:
60% stated better inventory accuracy
40% stated better customer engagement
36% stated anti-counterfeit
35% stated improved recall control
33% stated expiration date control
* Yes, people could choose more than one.
Finally, 85% of stakeholders see 3-5 years to get a higher data density solution to the current UPC established.
So there is certainly a lot of interest in GS1 Digital Link. While I’ve discussed the use of QR codes in this podcast, other data carriers that could be used (and be very interesting) are NFC RFID tags and the Digimarc system that turns the complete package into the barcode. Digimarc will be the topic of a future podcast.
Should be interesting days ahead.
How can we help you meet your objectives for your labeling and barcode operations? Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3. You can also email me at dholliday@idtechnology.com. We’ll be sure to get you in touch with an expert, right in your area!

Local save:http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/GS1DL-gtin-other-data.jpg

Image process :: Saving local image

grab remote location : http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/GS1DL-gtin-other-data.jpg

Image exists, checking for same file size

Replacing images : - ON

Customer Engagement and More – GS1 Digital Link

Using barcodes on packages for customer engagement? This idea is certainly not new – here is a link to a Packaging World article on this very topic from 2011.

The article specifically mentioned that QR codes would provide the ability to download coupons, enter contests, play games, and other fun activities – all powered by those little barcodes.

This all seemed quite exciting, but QR codes got old quickly and the concept seemed to fade away.

Fast forward to today and there is renewed interest in using packaging to actively engage with customers.

Customer Engagement and More – GS1 Digital Link

Listen to our GS1 Digital Link Podcast

Traditional ways to communicate to customers such as TV and print advertising are not performing as well as In the past.  These are also a one-way form of communication, yelling a message at consumers – no wonder they don’t work as well as in the past. In addition, engagement on a brand’s social media pages is in decline as well. What is a marketer to do?

As a result of all this, brand owners have a renewed interest trying to set up a direct connection to their customers based on the product packaging – the package is potentially the ultimate marketing tool.
Enter smart packaging – a means to allow brands to connect directly with their customers. Generally, a smart package will allow the customer to scan a barcode (yes, usually a QR Code) and be connected to an interactive website.

So QR codes are back – a lot of brands are using them – some quite creatively

Currently, there isn’t a standard to use QR codes  (or any type of barcode) for customer engagement so brands are tending to encode them in different ways – often just a URL, sometimes other data.
Of course, the package’s UPC  barcode still needs to be there so most items would have to have multiple barcodes – rather messy and takes up more space on the package.
The product UPC codes scanned at the point of sale haven’t really changed in the 45 years since the concept was introduced.

Wouldn’t it be great if, rather than have multiple barcodes on a package, a single one could contain the UPC data, weblink for customer engagement? Maybe we can!

Last year GS1 our favorite standards organization came out with a new concept: GS1 Digital Link.

While the name might not be too exciting, Digital Link has the potential to revolutionize how barcoding is used, to add true customer engagement and to (yes really) provide item-level serialization and traceability.
For primary packaging (what we would buy in a store), GS1’s barcoding is built around the concept of the Global Trade Item Number – GTIN. This is what is encoded in the common UPC barcode that is scanned at the checkout.
The GTIN in the item barcode basically consists of a company prefix and an SKU or stock keeping unit number. The GTIN identifies a type of product – a 12oz can of Pepsi Cola or an 8 oz bag of salt n vinegar Lay’s chips for example. Every item sold at retail and many other products that use the GS1 system (such as pharmaceutical or medical products) has a GTIN.
It is important to note that a GTIN doesn’t identify an individual item – every 12oz can of Pepsi will have the same GTIN.
Also, no additional data can be encoded in the product barcode – only the 12 digit UPC in the US or 13 digit EAN code internationally. This is why additional barcodes must currently be added to a package in the event a brand owner wants to encode more data.
Traditionally, barcodes in the GS1 system have been used in the supply chain from manufacturer to point of sale. They lose their usefulness once the product has been sold. GS1 Digital Link promises to extend the reach of the GS1 system all the way from the manufacturer to consumer and to provide a means of interaction between the brand owner and the consumer.

So how does it work?

For the first time, GS1 is allowing a 2D QR barcode to be used as the barcode for point of sale.
Encoded within the barcode is a URI (unique resource identifier – an example of which is the familiar website URLs we use every day) and a number of other possible data fields that include:
GTIN
Lot number
Serial number
The expiration date and many more
Some examples:
Note, the examples use the domain id.gs1.org, but brand owners can use their own domains.
Customer Engagement and More – GS1 Digital Link
Customer Engagement and More – GS1 Digital Link
An interesting addition to the new specification is that the data fields can be identified by either using the familiar GS1 Application Identifiers (AI) or by text identifiers. Note that this is only a quick intro, so check out the GS1 Digital Link specification to get complete information.
  The ability to include all this data in one barcode means that only one barcode needs to be printed on the package and it can be used for point of sale, traceability, anti-counterfeit and for customer engagement by sending a consumer who scans the code to an interactive website.
GS1 Digital Link could prove to be the biggest revolution in barcoding since the first code was scanned in a store 45 years ago.

When will this start?

It is going to take a while and we can expect to see both traditional UPC codes and the new QR codes used side by side until the infrastructure is in place to handle the new 2D barcodes.
 A survey carried out by the food marketing institute found that in the US nearly 40% of POS scanners are capable of reading 2D codes today and that will increase to about 55% by 2022.
The POS systems to handle the data are running somewhat behind, with an estimated 20% of systems being able to handle this data.
There is clearly a ways to go.
In the same survey, stakeholders saw the advantages of switching to data-rich solutions such as follows:
60% stated better inventory accuracy
40% stated better customer engagement
36% stated anti-counterfeit
35% stated improved recall control
33% stated expiration date control
* Yes, people could choose more than one.
Finally, 85% of stakeholders see 3-5 years to get a higher data density solution to the current UPC established.
So there is certainly a lot of interest in GS1 Digital Link. While I’ve discussed the use of QR codes in this podcast, other data carriers that could be used (and be very interesting) are NFC RFID tags and the Digimarc system that turns the complete package into the barcode. Digimarc will be the topic of a future podcast.
Should be interesting days ahead.
How can we help you meet your objectives for your labeling and barcode operations? Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3. You can also email me at dholliday@idtechnology.com. We’ll be sure to get you in touch with an expert, right in your area!

Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Labeling News [syndication_source_uri] => http://www.labelingnews.com [syndication_source_id] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed_id] => 12 [syndication_permalink] => http://www.labelingnews.com/2019/08/customer-engagement-and-more-gs1-digital-link/ [syndication_item_hash] => 1e5148b5aacb103170db86cec5f4b5cf )

Execute : Enclosure images

Enclosure save:

Array ( [0] => )

No match on

Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :Customer Engagement and More – GS1 Digital Link

Array ( [post_title] => Customer Engagement and More – GS1 Digital Link [post_content] =>

Customer Engagement and More – GS1 Digital Link

Using barcodes on packages for customer engagement? This idea is certainly not new – here is a link to a Packaging World article on this very topic from 2011.

The article specifically mentioned that QR codes would provide the ability to download coupons, enter contests, play games, and other fun activities – all powered by those little barcodes.

This all seemed quite exciting, but QR codes got old quickly and the concept seemed to fade away.

Fast forward to today and there is renewed interest in using packaging to actively engage with customers.

Customer Engagement and More – GS1 Digital Link

Listen to our GS1 Digital Link Podcast

Traditional ways to communicate to customers such as TV and print advertising are not performing as well as In the past.  These are also a one-way form of communication, yelling a message at consumers – no wonder they don’t work as well as in the past. In addition, engagement on a brand’s social media pages is in decline as well. What is a marketer to do?

As a result of all this, brand owners have a renewed interest trying to set up a direct connection to their customers based on the product packaging – the package is potentially the ultimate marketing tool.
Enter smart packaging – a means to allow brands to connect directly with their customers. Generally, a smart package will allow the customer to scan a barcode (yes, usually a QR Code) and be connected to an interactive website.

So QR codes are back – a lot of brands are using them – some quite creatively

Currently, there isn’t a standard to use QR codes  (or any type of barcode) for customer engagement so brands are tending to encode them in different ways – often just a URL, sometimes other data.
Of course, the package’s UPC  barcode still needs to be there so most items would have to have multiple barcodes – rather messy and takes up more space on the package.
The product UPC codes scanned at the point of sale haven’t really changed in the 45 years since the concept was introduced.

Wouldn’t it be great if, rather than have multiple barcodes on a package, a single one could contain the UPC data, weblink for customer engagement? Maybe we can!

Last year GS1 our favorite standards organization came out with a new concept: GS1 Digital Link.

While the name might not be too exciting, Digital Link has the potential to revolutionize how barcoding is used, to add true customer engagement and to (yes really) provide item-level serialization and traceability.
For primary packaging (what we would buy in a store), GS1’s barcoding is built around the concept of the Global Trade Item Number – GTIN. This is what is encoded in the common UPC barcode that is scanned at the checkout.
The GTIN in the item barcode basically consists of a company prefix and an SKU or stock keeping unit number. The GTIN identifies a type of product – a 12oz can of Pepsi Cola or an 8 oz bag of salt n vinegar Lay’s chips for example. Every item sold at retail and many other products that use the GS1 system (such as pharmaceutical or medical products) has a GTIN.
It is important to note that a GTIN doesn’t identify an individual item – every 12oz can of Pepsi will have the same GTIN.
Also, no additional data can be encoded in the product barcode – only the 12 digit UPC in the US or 13 digit EAN code internationally. This is why additional barcodes must currently be added to a package in the event a brand owner wants to encode more data.
Traditionally, barcodes in the GS1 system have been used in the supply chain from manufacturer to point of sale. They lose their usefulness once the product has been sold. GS1 Digital Link promises to extend the reach of the GS1 system all the way from the manufacturer to consumer and to provide a means of interaction between the brand owner and the consumer.

So how does it work?

For the first time, GS1 is allowing a 2D QR barcode to be used as the barcode for point of sale.
Encoded within the barcode is a URI (unique resource identifier – an example of which is the familiar website URLs we use every day) and a number of other possible data fields that include:
GTIN
Lot number
Serial number
The expiration date and many more
Some examples:
Note, the examples use the domain id.gs1.org, but brand owners can use their own domains.
Customer Engagement and More – GS1 Digital Link
Customer Engagement and More – GS1 Digital Link
Customer Engagement and More – GS1 Digital Link
An interesting addition to the new specification is that the data fields can be identified by either using the familiar GS1 Application Identifiers (AI) or by text identifiers. Note that this is only a quick intro, so check out the GS1 Digital Link specification to get complete information.
  The ability to include all this data in one barcode means that only one barcode needs to be printed on the package and it can be used for point of sale, traceability, anti-counterfeit and for customer engagement by sending a consumer who scans the code to an interactive website.
GS1 Digital Link could prove to be the biggest revolution in barcoding since the first code was scanned in a store 45 years ago.

When will this start?

It is going to take a while and we can expect to see both traditional UPC codes and the new QR codes used side by side until the infrastructure is in place to handle the new 2D barcodes.
 A survey carried out by the food marketing institute found that in the US nearly 40% of POS scanners are capable of reading 2D codes today and that will increase to about 55% by 2022.
The POS systems to handle the data are running somewhat behind, with an estimated 20% of systems being able to handle this data.
There is clearly a ways to go.
In the same survey, stakeholders saw the advantages of switching to data-rich solutions such as follows:
60% stated better inventory accuracy
40% stated better customer engagement
36% stated anti-counterfeit
35% stated improved recall control
33% stated expiration date control
* Yes, people could choose more than one.
Finally, 85% of stakeholders see 3-5 years to get a higher data density solution to the current UPC established.
So there is certainly a lot of interest in GS1 Digital Link. While I’ve discussed the use of QR codes in this podcast, other data carriers that could be used (and be very interesting) are NFC RFID tags and the Digimarc system that turns the complete package into the barcode. Digimarc will be the topic of a future podcast.
Should be interesting days ahead.
How can we help you meet your objectives for your labeling and barcode operations? Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3. You can also email me at dholliday@idtechnology.com. We’ll be sure to get you in touch with an expert, right in your area!
[post_excerpt] => Using barcodes on packages for customer engagement? This idea is certainly not new – here is a link to a Packaging World article on this very topic from 2011. The article specifically mentioned that QR codes would provide the ability to download coupons, enter contests, play games, and other fun activities – all powered by […] [post_date_gmt] => 2019-08-05 18:10:41 [post_date] => 2019-08-05 18:10:41 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-08-05 18:10:41 [post_modified] => 2019-08-05 18:10:41 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => http://www.labelingnews.com/?p=5952 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Labeling News [syndication_source_uri] => http://www.labelingnews.com [syndication_source_id] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed_id] => 12 [syndication_permalink] => http://www.labelingnews.com/2019/08/customer-engagement-and-more-gs1-digital-link/ [syndication_item_hash] => 1e5148b5aacb103170db86cec5f4b5cf [faf_featured_image] => 0 [faf_process_image] => 0,0,0,0,0 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 1625 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

FAF deciding on filters on post to be syndicated:

End of Parts & Service – SATO Printers

Array ( [post_title] => End of Parts & Service – SATO Printers [post_content] =>

As companies improve their products and introduce new models, earlier generations are discontinued and eventually can no longer be supported.

I recently received a reminder from SATO that some of their legacy models have reached the end of their service/support period.

Included are the following models:

SATO EOS

 

You can see the original SATO end of service notice here: SATO EOS Doc

Most users of these printers have already upgraded to current models, but if you happen to still be using any of these models, please note that by the end of August, service will end and spare parts will be limited until the end of the year, after which they can’t be ordered.

What Should You Do?

If you do use any of these discontinued printers, it is best to upgrade to a new  SATO CLNX printer. The new model has a lot of advantages and is designed to be a simple replacement for older printers. SATO also has a special trade-in program for the legacy printers that you can take advantage of. ID Technology can help you with every step of this process.

Want to Get Started?

Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3. You can also email me at dholliday@idtechnology.com. We’ll be sure to get you in touch with one of our labeling experts, right in your area.

[post_excerpt] => As companies improve their products and introduce new models, earlier generations are discontinued and eventually can no longer be supported. I recently received a reminder from SATO that some of their legacy models have reached the end of their service/support period. Included are the following models:   You can see the original SATO end of […] [post_date_gmt] => 2019-07-08 13:43:26 [post_date] => 2019-07-08 13:43:26 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-07-08 13:43:26 [post_modified] => 2019-07-08 13:43:26 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => http://www.labelingnews.com/?p=5948 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Labeling News [syndication_source_uri] => http://www.labelingnews.com [syndication_source_id] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed_id] => 12 [syndication_permalink] => http://www.labelingnews.com/2019/07/end-of-parts-service-sato-printers/ [syndication_item_hash] => ad8095d3f74bd5de50bcb5355c1f6d3e ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 1625 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

Doing filter:faf_image_filter

Execute image filter

Image process

Local save:http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/SATO-end-support-1.jpg

Image process :: Saving local image

grab remote location : http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/SATO-end-support-1.jpg

Image exists, checking for same file size

Replacing images : SATO EOS - SATO EOS ON

As companies improve their products and introduce new models, earlier generations are discontinued and eventually can no longer be supported.

I recently received a reminder from SATO that some of their legacy models have reached the end of their service/support period.

Included are the following models:

SATO EOS

 

You can see the original SATO end of service notice here: SATO EOS Doc

Most users of these printers have already upgraded to current models, but if you happen to still be using any of these models, please note that by the end of August, service will end and spare parts will be limited until the end of the year, after which they can’t be ordered.

What Should You Do?

If you do use any of these discontinued printers, it is best to upgrade to a new  SATO CLNX printer. The new model has a lot of advantages and is designed to be a simple replacement for older printers. SATO also has a special trade-in program for the legacy printers that you can take advantage of. ID Technology can help you with every step of this process.

Want to Get Started?

Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3. You can also email me at dholliday@idtechnology.com. We’ll be sure to get you in touch with one of our labeling experts, right in your area.

Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Labeling News [syndication_source_uri] => http://www.labelingnews.com [syndication_source_id] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed_id] => 12 [syndication_permalink] => http://www.labelingnews.com/2019/07/end-of-parts-service-sato-printers/ [syndication_item_hash] => ad8095d3f74bd5de50bcb5355c1f6d3e )

Execute : Enclosure images

Enclosure save:

Array ( [0] => )

No match on

Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :End of Parts & Service – SATO Printers

Array ( [post_title] => End of Parts & Service – SATO Printers [post_content] =>

As companies improve their products and introduce new models, earlier generations are discontinued and eventually can no longer be supported.

I recently received a reminder from SATO that some of their legacy models have reached the end of their service/support period.

Included are the following models:

End of Parts & Service – SATO Printers

 

You can see the original SATO end of service notice here: SATO EOS Doc

Most users of these printers have already upgraded to current models, but if you happen to still be using any of these models, please note that by the end of August, service will end and spare parts will be limited until the end of the year, after which they can’t be ordered.

What Should You Do?

If you do use any of these discontinued printers, it is best to upgrade to a new  SATO CLNX printer. The new model has a lot of advantages and is designed to be a simple replacement for older printers. SATO also has a special trade-in program for the legacy printers that you can take advantage of. ID Technology can help you with every step of this process.

Want to Get Started?

Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3. You can also email me at dholliday@idtechnology.com. We’ll be sure to get you in touch with one of our labeling experts, right in your area.

[post_excerpt] => As companies improve their products and introduce new models, earlier generations are discontinued and eventually can no longer be supported. I recently received a reminder from SATO that some of their legacy models have reached the end of their service/support period. Included are the following models:   You can see the original SATO end of […] [post_date_gmt] => 2019-07-08 13:43:26 [post_date] => 2019-07-08 13:43:26 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-07-08 13:43:26 [post_modified] => 2019-07-08 13:43:26 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => http://www.labelingnews.com/?p=5948 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Labeling News [syndication_source_uri] => http://www.labelingnews.com [syndication_source_id] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed_id] => 12 [syndication_permalink] => http://www.labelingnews.com/2019/07/end-of-parts-service-sato-printers/ [syndication_item_hash] => ad8095d3f74bd5de50bcb5355c1f6d3e [faf_featured_image] => 0 [faf_process_image] => 0 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 1625 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

FAF deciding on filters on post to be syndicated:

Podcast – Lasers and Sustainability

Array ( [post_title] => Podcast – Lasers and Sustainability [post_content] =>

The Labeling News PodcastOur most recent podcast covered two topics:

The Loop waste-free packaging concept and how laser coding can help brands meet their sustainability targets.

In this episode I take advantage of a visit to Macsa ID in Barcelona, to chat with Macsa’s CEO Jordi Pinot on the topic of sustainability in packaging and how laser coding can help companies meet their sustainability goals.

Before this, there is a quick update on the Loop circular packaging system. Kroger is now a Loop partner here in the US as well as Walgreens. I’m still somewhat skeptical about this, but it does seem to be making progress.

Loop Waste Free Packaging Concept

On the topic of lasers for coding and marking products, Macsa has a very complete line up of laser systems for just about every application – see more info here: https://www.idtechnology.com/products/coding-solutions/laser-coders/

Laser Coding Can Help Meet Sustainability Targets

In the podcast, we discuss how laser coding allows for permanent prints to be added to all kinds of products. Lasers use no inks or solvents, making them an environmentally friendly way to add date and traceability codes as well as barcodes to many types of packaging materials.

Listen to the podcast here: Labeling News Podcast Episode 5   or search for Labeling News at Apple Podcasts or Spotify.

 

[post_excerpt] => Our most recent podcast covered two topics: The Loop waste-free packaging concept and how laser coding can help brands meet their sustainability targets. In this episode I take advantage of a visit to Macsa ID in Barcelona, to chat with Macsa’s CEO Jordi Pinot on the topic of sustainability in packaging and how laser coding […] [post_date_gmt] => 2019-06-20 12:43:21 [post_date] => 2019-06-20 12:43:21 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-06-20 12:43:21 [post_modified] => 2019-06-20 12:43:21 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => http://www.labelingnews.com/?p=5942 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Labeling News [syndication_source_uri] => http://www.labelingnews.com [syndication_source_id] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed_id] => 12 [syndication_permalink] => http://www.labelingnews.com/2019/06/podcast-lasers-and-sustainability/ [syndication_item_hash] => 0b8ad6117407d36c3ba725c7ac734c57 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 1625 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

Doing filter:faf_image_filter

Execute image filter

Image process

Local save:http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/PodcastThumbblog-150x150.jpg

Image process :: Saving local image

grab remote location : http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/PodcastThumbblog-150x150.jpg

Image exists, checking for same file size

Replacing images : The Labeling News Podcast - The Labeling News Podcast ON

The Labeling News PodcastOur most recent podcast covered two topics:

The Loop waste-free packaging concept and how laser coding can help brands meet their sustainability targets.

In this episode I take advantage of a visit to Macsa ID in Barcelona, to chat with Macsa’s CEO Jordi Pinot on the topic of sustainability in packaging and how laser coding can help companies meet their sustainability goals.

Before this, there is a quick update on the Loop circular packaging system. Kroger is now a Loop partner here in the US as well as Walgreens. I’m still somewhat skeptical about this, but it does seem to be making progress.

Loop Waste Free Packaging Concept

On the topic of lasers for coding and marking products, Macsa has a very complete line up of laser systems for just about every application – see more info here: https://www.idtechnology.com/products/coding-solutions/laser-coders/

Laser Coding Can Help Meet Sustainability Targets

In the podcast, we discuss how laser coding allows for permanent prints to be added to all kinds of products. Lasers use no inks or solvents, making them an environmentally friendly way to add date and traceability codes as well as barcodes to many types of packaging materials.

Listen to the podcast here: Labeling News Podcast Episode 5   or search for Labeling News at Apple Podcasts or Spotify.

 

Local save:http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/Loop-Packaging-Concept.jpg

Image process :: Saving local image

grab remote location : http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/Loop-Packaging-Concept.jpg

Image exists, checking for same file size

Replacing images : - ON

Podcast – Lasers and SustainabilityOur most recent podcast covered two topics:

The Loop waste-free packaging concept and how laser coding can help brands meet their sustainability targets.

In this episode I take advantage of a visit to Macsa ID in Barcelona, to chat with Macsa’s CEO Jordi Pinot on the topic of sustainability in packaging and how laser coding can help companies meet their sustainability goals.

Before this, there is a quick update on the Loop circular packaging system. Kroger is now a Loop partner here in the US as well as Walgreens. I’m still somewhat skeptical about this, but it does seem to be making progress.

Loop Waste Free Packaging Concept

On the topic of lasers for coding and marking products, Macsa has a very complete line up of laser systems for just about every application – see more info here: https://www.idtechnology.com/products/coding-solutions/laser-coders/

Laser Coding Can Help Meet Sustainability Targets

In the podcast, we discuss how laser coding allows for permanent prints to be added to all kinds of products. Lasers use no inks or solvents, making them an environmentally friendly way to add date and traceability codes as well as barcodes to many types of packaging materials.

Listen to the podcast here: Labeling News Podcast Episode 5   or search for Labeling News at Apple Podcasts or Spotify.

 

Local save:http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/lasers-sustainabilty.jpg

Image process :: Saving local image

grab remote location : http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/lasers-sustainabilty.jpg

Image exists, checking for same file size

Replacing images : - ON

Podcast – Lasers and SustainabilityOur most recent podcast covered two topics:

The Loop waste-free packaging concept and how laser coding can help brands meet their sustainability targets.

In this episode I take advantage of a visit to Macsa ID in Barcelona, to chat with Macsa’s CEO Jordi Pinot on the topic of sustainability in packaging and how laser coding can help companies meet their sustainability goals.

Before this, there is a quick update on the Loop circular packaging system. Kroger is now a Loop partner here in the US as well as Walgreens. I’m still somewhat skeptical about this, but it does seem to be making progress.

Podcast – Lasers and Sustainability

Loop Waste Free Packaging Concept

On the topic of lasers for coding and marking products, Macsa has a very complete line up of laser systems for just about every application – see more info here: https://www.idtechnology.com/products/coding-solutions/laser-coders/

Laser Coding Can Help Meet Sustainability Targets

In the podcast, we discuss how laser coding allows for permanent prints to be added to all kinds of products. Lasers use no inks or solvents, making them an environmentally friendly way to add date and traceability codes as well as barcodes to many types of packaging materials.

Listen to the podcast here: Labeling News Podcast Episode 5   or search for Labeling News at Apple Podcasts or Spotify.

 

Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Labeling News [syndication_source_uri] => http://www.labelingnews.com [syndication_source_id] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed_id] => 12 [syndication_permalink] => http://www.labelingnews.com/2019/06/podcast-lasers-and-sustainability/ [syndication_item_hash] => 0b8ad6117407d36c3ba725c7ac734c57 )

Execute : Enclosure images

Enclosure save:

Array ( [0] => )

No match on

Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :Podcast – Lasers and Sustainability

Array ( [post_title] => Podcast – Lasers and Sustainability [post_content] =>

Podcast – Lasers and SustainabilityOur most recent podcast covered two topics:

The Loop waste-free packaging concept and how laser coding can help brands meet their sustainability targets.

In this episode I take advantage of a visit to Macsa ID in Barcelona, to chat with Macsa’s CEO Jordi Pinot on the topic of sustainability in packaging and how laser coding can help companies meet their sustainability goals.

Before this, there is a quick update on the Loop circular packaging system. Kroger is now a Loop partner here in the US as well as Walgreens. I’m still somewhat skeptical about this, but it does seem to be making progress.

Podcast – Lasers and Sustainability

Loop Waste Free Packaging Concept

On the topic of lasers for coding and marking products, Macsa has a very complete line up of laser systems for just about every application – see more info here: https://www.idtechnology.com/products/coding-solutions/laser-coders/

Podcast – Lasers and Sustainability

Laser Coding Can Help Meet Sustainability Targets

In the podcast, we discuss how laser coding allows for permanent prints to be added to all kinds of products. Lasers use no inks or solvents, making them an environmentally friendly way to add date and traceability codes as well as barcodes to many types of packaging materials.

Listen to the podcast here: Labeling News Podcast Episode 5   or search for Labeling News at Apple Podcasts or Spotify.

 

[post_excerpt] => Our most recent podcast covered two topics: The Loop waste-free packaging concept and how laser coding can help brands meet their sustainability targets. In this episode I take advantage of a visit to Macsa ID in Barcelona, to chat with Macsa’s CEO Jordi Pinot on the topic of sustainability in packaging and how laser coding […] [post_date_gmt] => 2019-06-20 12:43:21 [post_date] => 2019-06-20 12:43:21 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-06-20 12:43:21 [post_modified] => 2019-06-20 12:43:21 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => http://www.labelingnews.com/?p=5942 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Labeling News [syndication_source_uri] => http://www.labelingnews.com [syndication_source_id] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed_id] => 12 [syndication_permalink] => http://www.labelingnews.com/2019/06/podcast-lasers-and-sustainability/ [syndication_item_hash] => 0b8ad6117407d36c3ba725c7ac734c57 [faf_featured_image] => 0 [faf_process_image] => 0,0,0 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 1625 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

FAF deciding on filters on post to be syndicated:

Product Handling Considerations for Barcoding on Shipping Cases

Array ( [post_title] => Product Handling Considerations for Barcoding on Shipping Cases [post_content] =>

Using inkjet printers to add variable information to shipping cases, is increasing in popularity. Using this technique can dramatically reduce the number of pre-printed items that need to be managed and fit into company efforts to increase digitalization and move to a lean workflow.

Here at ID Technology, we have a lot of experience when it comes to installing inkjet systems for printing barcodes, text and graphics onto corrugated cases. We are a founding distributor of the FoxJet ProSeries system and have won the prestigious Regency Award for top FoxJet distributor for 14 consecutive years.

If there is one thing we’ve learned over this time, it’s that having good product handling is as important as having good printing equipment for getting the high-quality, compliant GS1 barcodes that customers demand. If the boxes are not presented consistently and accurately to the printheads, this will show in poor print quality and in particular will not allow high-quality barcodes to be printed.

To help educate users on best practices for product handling, our friends at FoxJet recently produced a detailed whitepaper on this topic that goes over many of the issues that are important to ensure great quality printing every time.

FoxJet ProSeries Printers

The whitepaper the transition from the case taper or sealer to the conveyor where the barcode printers are installed as being an area of crucial importance. Because space is often limited on packaging lines, the printheads often have to be installed very close to the exit of the case sealer. Some important factors are:

Carton Control – Proximity to the Printhead

It is important that after leaving the case sealer, the boxes are correctly presented the correct distance from the printheads. The drops of ink that are fired from the printheads can only travel a short distance while maintaining accuracy. If the box is too far away, print quality will decline and if so close it hits the printhead, damage might occur.

Be sure to control the boxes gently so that the boxes are undamaged as they pass through your packaging processes.

It’s best to use guide rails to accurately control the position of the box and even better use in conjunction with FoxJet’s retracting printhead brackets. This bracket uses a roller allow the printhead to be the correct distance from the box every time.

Product/Conveyor Speed

Ensure that boxes leaving your case sealer are traveling at a speed that is within the limits of your inkjet printer. Our FoxJet ProSeries printheads are able to print high-quality text, barcodes and images at up to 300ft per minute, which is enough for all but the fastest production lines.

Angel Hair

No, we are not talking pasta here! Some case sealing machines use hot melt adhesive to hold the flaps on the boxes closed. At times the adhesive applicators can leave a stringy residue behind that can get stuck to the printheads and block the tiny nozzles. Dust from the corrugated boxes can be bad too – be sure to regularly clean your packaging equipment and the printheads.

Vibrations

Good quality printing depends on the boxes being transferred smoothly past the printheads. Make sure your conveyor belt runs smoothly and that you are not dropping boxes onto the conveyor where the printheads are mounted. We’ve seen this happen and the results are not always pretty!

Best Practice of All

The best way to get the best labeling or coding for your shipping cases is to connect with your local ID Technology representative. With many years of experience, combined with the case packing, sealing and product handling of ProMach, we are able to help you determine the best solution for all your case coding or labeling needs.

How can ID Technology and ProMach help you meet your objectives for your packaging barcode and coding operations? Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3. You can also email me at dholliday@idtechnology.com. We’ll be sure to get you in touch with an expert, right in your area!

[post_excerpt] => Using inkjet printers to add variable information to shipping cases, is increasing in popularity. Using this technique can dramatically reduce the number of pre-printed items that need to be managed and fit into company efforts to increase digitalization and move to a lean workflow. Here at ID Technology, we have a lot of experience when […] [post_date_gmt] => 2019-06-18 21:03:04 [post_date] => 2019-06-18 21:03:04 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-06-18 21:03:04 [post_modified] => 2019-06-18 21:03:04 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => http://www.labelingnews.com/?p=5937 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Labeling News [syndication_source_uri] => http://www.labelingnews.com [syndication_source_id] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed_id] => 12 [syndication_permalink] => http://www.labelingnews.com/2019/06/product-handling-considerations-for-barcoding-on-shipping-cases/ [syndication_item_hash] => 380c6e3d4f6ebf63ea44ce5e8d7bf988 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 1625 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

Doing filter:faf_image_filter

Execute image filter

Image process

Local save:http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/warehouse-pallets.jpg

Image process :: Saving local image

grab remote location : http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/warehouse-pallets.jpg

Image exists, checking for same file size

Replacing images : - ON

Using inkjet printers to add variable information to shipping cases, is increasing in popularity. Using this technique can dramatically reduce the number of pre-printed items that need to be managed and fit into company efforts to increase digitalization and move to a lean workflow.

Here at ID Technology, we have a lot of experience when it comes to installing inkjet systems for printing barcodes, text and graphics onto corrugated cases. We are a founding distributor of the FoxJet ProSeries system and have won the prestigious Regency Award for top FoxJet distributor for 14 consecutive years.

If there is one thing we’ve learned over this time, it’s that having good product handling is as important as having good printing equipment for getting the high-quality, compliant GS1 barcodes that customers demand. If the boxes are not presented consistently and accurately to the printheads, this will show in poor print quality and in particular will not allow high-quality barcodes to be printed.

To help educate users on best practices for product handling, our friends at FoxJet recently produced a detailed whitepaper on this topic that goes over many of the issues that are important to ensure great quality printing every time.

FoxJet ProSeries Printers

The whitepaper the transition from the case taper or sealer to the conveyor where the barcode printers are installed as being an area of crucial importance. Because space is often limited on packaging lines, the printheads often have to be installed very close to the exit of the case sealer. Some important factors are:

Carton Control – Proximity to the Printhead

It is important that after leaving the case sealer, the boxes are correctly presented the correct distance from the printheads. The drops of ink that are fired from the printheads can only travel a short distance while maintaining accuracy. If the box is too far away, print quality will decline and if so close it hits the printhead, damage might occur.

Be sure to control the boxes gently so that the boxes are undamaged as they pass through your packaging processes.

It’s best to use guide rails to accurately control the position of the box and even better use in conjunction with FoxJet’s retracting printhead brackets. This bracket uses a roller allow the printhead to be the correct distance from the box every time.

Product/Conveyor Speed

Ensure that boxes leaving your case sealer are traveling at a speed that is within the limits of your inkjet printer. Our FoxJet ProSeries printheads are able to print high-quality text, barcodes and images at up to 300ft per minute, which is enough for all but the fastest production lines.

Angel Hair

No, we are not talking pasta here! Some case sealing machines use hot melt adhesive to hold the flaps on the boxes closed. At times the adhesive applicators can leave a stringy residue behind that can get stuck to the printheads and block the tiny nozzles. Dust from the corrugated boxes can be bad too – be sure to regularly clean your packaging equipment and the printheads.

Vibrations

Good quality printing depends on the boxes being transferred smoothly past the printheads. Make sure your conveyor belt runs smoothly and that you are not dropping boxes onto the conveyor where the printheads are mounted. We’ve seen this happen and the results are not always pretty!

Best Practice of All

The best way to get the best labeling or coding for your shipping cases is to connect with your local ID Technology representative. With many years of experience, combined with the case packing, sealing and product handling of ProMach, we are able to help you determine the best solution for all your case coding or labeling needs.

How can ID Technology and ProMach help you meet your objectives for your packaging barcode and coding operations? Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3. You can also email me at dholliday@idtechnology.com. We’ll be sure to get you in touch with an expert, right in your area!

Local save:http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/FJ-WP.jpg

Image process :: Saving local image

grab remote location : http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/FJ-WP.jpg

Image exists, checking for same file size

Replacing images : - ON

Product Handling Considerations for Barcoding on Shipping CasesUsing inkjet printers to add variable information to shipping cases, is increasing in popularity. Using this technique can dramatically reduce the number of pre-printed items that need to be managed and fit into company efforts to increase digitalization and move to a lean workflow.

Here at ID Technology, we have a lot of experience when it comes to installing inkjet systems for printing barcodes, text and graphics onto corrugated cases. We are a founding distributor of the FoxJet ProSeries system and have won the prestigious Regency Award for top FoxJet distributor for 14 consecutive years.

If there is one thing we’ve learned over this time, it’s that having good product handling is as important as having good printing equipment for getting the high-quality, compliant GS1 barcodes that customers demand. If the boxes are not presented consistently and accurately to the printheads, this will show in poor print quality and in particular will not allow high-quality barcodes to be printed.

To help educate users on best practices for product handling, our friends at FoxJet recently produced a detailed whitepaper on this topic that goes over many of the issues that are important to ensure great quality printing every time.

FoxJet ProSeries Printers

The whitepaper the transition from the case taper or sealer to the conveyor where the barcode printers are installed as being an area of crucial importance. Because space is often limited on packaging lines, the printheads often have to be installed very close to the exit of the case sealer. Some important factors are:

Carton Control – Proximity to the Printhead

It is important that after leaving the case sealer, the boxes are correctly presented the correct distance from the printheads. The drops of ink that are fired from the printheads can only travel a short distance while maintaining accuracy. If the box is too far away, print quality will decline and if so close it hits the printhead, damage might occur.

Be sure to control the boxes gently so that the boxes are undamaged as they pass through your packaging processes.

It’s best to use guide rails to accurately control the position of the box and even better use in conjunction with FoxJet’s retracting printhead brackets. This bracket uses a roller allow the printhead to be the correct distance from the box every time.

Product/Conveyor Speed

Ensure that boxes leaving your case sealer are traveling at a speed that is within the limits of your inkjet printer. Our FoxJet ProSeries printheads are able to print high-quality text, barcodes and images at up to 300ft per minute, which is enough for all but the fastest production lines.

Angel Hair

No, we are not talking pasta here! Some case sealing machines use hot melt adhesive to hold the flaps on the boxes closed. At times the adhesive applicators can leave a stringy residue behind that can get stuck to the printheads and block the tiny nozzles. Dust from the corrugated boxes can be bad too – be sure to regularly clean your packaging equipment and the printheads.

Vibrations

Good quality printing depends on the boxes being transferred smoothly past the printheads. Make sure your conveyor belt runs smoothly and that you are not dropping boxes onto the conveyor where the printheads are mounted. We’ve seen this happen and the results are not always pretty!

Best Practice of All

The best way to get the best labeling or coding for your shipping cases is to connect with your local ID Technology representative. With many years of experience, combined with the case packing, sealing and product handling of ProMach, we are able to help you determine the best solution for all your case coding or labeling needs.

How can ID Technology and ProMach help you meet your objectives for your packaging barcode and coding operations? Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3. You can also email me at dholliday@idtechnology.com. We’ll be sure to get you in touch with an expert, right in your area!

Local save:http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/proseries.jpg

Image process :: Saving local image

grab remote location : http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/proseries.jpg

Image exists, checking for same file size

Replacing images : - ON

Product Handling Considerations for Barcoding on Shipping CasesUsing inkjet printers to add variable information to shipping cases, is increasing in popularity. Using this technique can dramatically reduce the number of pre-printed items that need to be managed and fit into company efforts to increase digitalization and move to a lean workflow.

Here at ID Technology, we have a lot of experience when it comes to installing inkjet systems for printing barcodes, text and graphics onto corrugated cases. We are a founding distributor of the Product Handling Considerations for Barcoding on Shipping CasesFoxJet ProSeries system and have won the prestigious Regency Award for top FoxJet distributor for 14 consecutive years.

If there is one thing we’ve learned over this time, it’s that having good product handling is as important as having good printing equipment for getting the high-quality, compliant GS1 barcodes that customers demand. If the boxes are not presented consistently and accurately to the printheads, this will show in poor print quality and in particular will not allow high-quality barcodes to be printed.

To help educate users on best practices for product handling, our friends at FoxJet recently produced a detailed whitepaper on this topic that goes over many of the issues that are important to ensure great quality printing every time.

FoxJet ProSeries Printers

The whitepaper the transition from the case taper or sealer to the conveyor where the barcode printers are installed as being an area of crucial importance. Because space is often limited on packaging lines, the printheads often have to be installed very close to the exit of the case sealer. Some important factors are:

Carton Control – Proximity to the Printhead

It is important that after leaving the case sealer, the boxes are correctly presented the correct distance from the printheads. The drops of ink that are fired from the printheads can only travel a short distance while maintaining accuracy. If the box is too far away, print quality will decline and if so close it hits the printhead, damage might occur.

Be sure to control the boxes gently so that the boxes are undamaged as they pass through your packaging processes.

It’s best to use guide rails to accurately control the position of the box and even better use in conjunction with FoxJet’s retracting printhead brackets. This bracket uses a roller allow the printhead to be the correct distance from the box every time.

Product/Conveyor Speed

Ensure that boxes leaving your case sealer are traveling at a speed that is within the limits of your inkjet printer. Our FoxJet ProSeries printheads are able to print high-quality text, barcodes and images at up to 300ft per minute, which is enough for all but the fastest production lines.

Angel Hair

No, we are not talking pasta here! Some case sealing machines use hot melt adhesive to hold the flaps on the boxes closed. At times the adhesive applicators can leave a stringy residue behind that can get stuck to the printheads and block the tiny nozzles. Dust from the corrugated boxes can be bad too – be sure to regularly clean your packaging equipment and the printheads.

Vibrations

Good quality printing depends on the boxes being transferred smoothly past the printheads. Make sure your conveyor belt runs smoothly and that you are not dropping boxes onto the conveyor where the printheads are mounted. We’ve seen this happen and the results are not always pretty!

Best Practice of All

The best way to get the best labeling or coding for your shipping cases is to connect with your local ID Technology representative. With many years of experience, combined with the case packing, sealing and product handling of ProMach, we are able to help you determine the best solution for all your case coding or labeling needs.

How can ID Technology and ProMach help you meet your objectives for your packaging barcode and coding operations? Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3. You can also email me at dholliday@idtechnology.com. We’ll be sure to get you in touch with an expert, right in your area!

Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Labeling News [syndication_source_uri] => http://www.labelingnews.com [syndication_source_id] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed_id] => 12 [syndication_permalink] => http://www.labelingnews.com/2019/06/product-handling-considerations-for-barcoding-on-shipping-cases/ [syndication_item_hash] => 380c6e3d4f6ebf63ea44ce5e8d7bf988 )

Execute : Enclosure images

Enclosure save:

Array ( [0] => )

No match on

Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :Product Handling Considerations for Barcoding on Shipping Cases

Array ( [post_title] => Product Handling Considerations for Barcoding on Shipping Cases [post_content] =>

Product Handling Considerations for Barcoding on Shipping CasesUsing inkjet printers to add variable information to shipping cases, is increasing in popularity. Using this technique can dramatically reduce the number of pre-printed items that need to be managed and fit into company efforts to increase digitalization and move to a lean workflow.

Here at ID Technology, we have a lot of experience when it comes to installing inkjet systems for printing barcodes, text and graphics onto corrugated cases. We are a founding distributor of the Product Handling Considerations for Barcoding on Shipping CasesFoxJet ProSeries system and have won the prestigious Regency Award for top FoxJet distributor for 14 consecutive years.

If there is one thing we’ve learned over this time, it’s that having good product handling is as important as having good printing equipment for getting the high-quality, compliant GS1 barcodes that customers demand. If the boxes are not presented consistently and accurately to the printheads, this will show in poor print quality and in particular will not allow high-quality barcodes to be printed.

To help educate users on best practices for product handling, our friends at FoxJet recently produced a detailed whitepaper on this topic that goes over many of the issues that are important to ensure great quality printing every time.

Product Handling Considerations for Barcoding on Shipping Cases

FoxJet ProSeries Printers

The whitepaper the transition from the case taper or sealer to the conveyor where the barcode printers are installed as being an area of crucial importance. Because space is often limited on packaging lines, the printheads often have to be installed very close to the exit of the case sealer. Some important factors are:

Carton Control – Proximity to the Printhead

It is important that after leaving the case sealer, the boxes are correctly presented the correct distance from the printheads. The drops of ink that are fired from the printheads can only travel a short distance while maintaining accuracy. If the box is too far away, print quality will decline and if so close it hits the printhead, damage might occur.

Be sure to control the boxes gently so that the boxes are undamaged as they pass through your packaging processes.

It’s best to use guide rails to accurately control the position of the box and even better use in conjunction with FoxJet’s retracting printhead brackets. This bracket uses a roller allow the printhead to be the correct distance from the box every time.

Product/Conveyor Speed

Ensure that boxes leaving your case sealer are traveling at a speed that is within the limits of your inkjet printer. Our FoxJet ProSeries printheads are able to print high-quality text, barcodes and images at up to 300ft per minute, which is enough for all but the fastest production lines.

Angel Hair

No, we are not talking pasta here! Some case sealing machines use hot melt adhesive to hold the flaps on the boxes closed. At times the adhesive applicators can leave a stringy residue behind that can get stuck to the printheads and block the tiny nozzles. Dust from the corrugated boxes can be bad too – be sure to regularly clean your packaging equipment and the printheads.

Vibrations

Good quality printing depends on the boxes being transferred smoothly past the printheads. Make sure your conveyor belt runs smoothly and that you are not dropping boxes onto the conveyor where the printheads are mounted. We’ve seen this happen and the results are not always pretty!

Best Practice of All

The best way to get the best labeling or coding for your shipping cases is to connect with your local ID Technology representative. With many years of experience, combined with the case packing, sealing and product handling of ProMach, we are able to help you determine the best solution for all your case coding or labeling needs.

How can ID Technology and ProMach help you meet your objectives for your packaging barcode and coding operations? Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3. You can also email me at dholliday@idtechnology.com. We’ll be sure to get you in touch with an expert, right in your area!

[post_excerpt] => Using inkjet printers to add variable information to shipping cases, is increasing in popularity. Using this technique can dramatically reduce the number of pre-printed items that need to be managed and fit into company efforts to increase digitalization and move to a lean workflow. Here at ID Technology, we have a lot of experience when […] [post_date_gmt] => 2019-06-18 21:03:04 [post_date] => 2019-06-18 21:03:04 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-06-18 21:03:04 [post_modified] => 2019-06-18 21:03:04 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => http://www.labelingnews.com/?p=5937 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Labeling News [syndication_source_uri] => http://www.labelingnews.com [syndication_source_id] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed_id] => 12 [syndication_permalink] => http://www.labelingnews.com/2019/06/product-handling-considerations-for-barcoding-on-shipping-cases/ [syndication_item_hash] => 380c6e3d4f6ebf63ea44ce5e8d7bf988 [faf_featured_image] => 0 [faf_process_image] => 0,0,0 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 1625 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )


Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /homepages/41/d79740523/htdocs/converternews/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/syndicatedlink.class.php on line 302

FAF deciding on filters on post to be syndicated:

[WordPress]抜粋表示にしてみた

Array ( [post_title] => [WordPress]抜粋表示にしてみた [post_content] => “index.php” に書かれている get_template_part( 'template-parts/post/content',get_post_format()); と記述されていたの …

[post_excerpt] => “index.php” に書かれている get_template_part( 'template-parts/post/content',get_post_format()); と記述されていたの … "[WordPress]抜粋表示にしてみた" の続きを読む [post_date_gmt] => 2019-11-01 04:46:18 [post_date] => 2019-11-01 04:46:18 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-11-01 04:46:18 [post_modified] => 2019-11-01 04:46:18 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => https://prinblog.com/?p=100 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => プリンのブログ [syndication_source_uri] => https://prinblog.com [syndication_source_id] => http://www.prinblog.com/feed/ [syndication_feed] => http://www.prinblog.com/feed/ [syndication_feed_id] => 104 [syndication_permalink] => https://prinblog.com/2019/11/01/13/46/18/100/programming/prin/wordpress%E6%8A%9C%E7%B2%8B%E8%A1%A8%E7%A4%BA%E3%81%AB%E3%81%97%E3%81%A6%E3%81%BF%E3%81%9F/ [syndication_item_hash] => 98427acf1519e4845a960da6ee3ed10e ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 7304 [1] => 1089 [2] => 899 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

Doing filter:faf_image_filter

Execute image filter

Image process

No image matches

Array ( )

Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => プリンのブログ [syndication_source_uri] => https://prinblog.com [syndication_source_id] => http://www.prinblog.com/feed/ [syndication_feed] => http://www.prinblog.com/feed/ [syndication_feed_id] => 104 [syndication_permalink] => https://prinblog.com/2019/11/01/13/46/18/100/programming/prin/wordpress%E6%8A%9C%E7%B2%8B%E8%A1%A8%E7%A4%BA%E3%81%AB%E3%81%97%E3%81%A6%E3%81%BF%E3%81%9F/ [syndication_item_hash] => 98427acf1519e4845a960da6ee3ed10e )

Execute : Enclosure images

Enclosure save:

Array ( [0] => )

No match on

Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :[WordPress]抜粋表示にしてみた

Array ( [post_title] => [WordPress]抜粋表示にしてみた [post_content] => “index.php” に書かれている get_template_part( 'template-parts/post/content',get_post_format()); と記述されていたの …

[post_excerpt] => “index.php” に書かれている get_template_part( 'template-parts/post/content',get_post_format()); と記述されていたの … "[WordPress]抜粋表示にしてみた" の続きを読む [post_date_gmt] => 2019-11-01 04:46:18 [post_date] => 2019-11-01 04:46:18 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-11-01 04:46:18 [post_modified] => 2019-11-01 04:46:18 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => https://prinblog.com/?p=100 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => プリンのブログ [syndication_source_uri] => https://prinblog.com [syndication_source_id] => http://www.prinblog.com/feed/ [syndication_feed] => http://www.prinblog.com/feed/ [syndication_feed_id] => 104 [syndication_permalink] => https://prinblog.com/2019/11/01/13/46/18/100/programming/prin/wordpress%E6%8A%9C%E7%B2%8B%E8%A1%A8%E7%A4%BA%E3%81%AB%E3%81%97%E3%81%A6%E3%81%BF%E3%81%9F/ [syndication_item_hash] => 98427acf1519e4845a960da6ee3ed10e [faf_process_image] => ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 7304 [1] => 1089 [2] => 899 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

FAF deciding on filters on post to be syndicated:

新しい AirPods Pro が発表されたよ!

Array ( [post_title] => 新しい AirPods Pro が発表されたよ! [post_content] => しれーっとAirPodsProが発表されましたね。 発売日は、10月30日らしいですが 見た目としては、はみ出ているうどんの部分が短くなった気がしますね。 そして今回私が今回一番気になっている機能は、何と言っても、「アク …

[post_excerpt] => しれーっとAirPodsProが発表されましたね。 発売日は、10月30日らしいですが 見た目としては、はみ出ているうどんの部分が短くなった気がしますね。 そして今回私が今回一番気になっている機能は、何と言っても、「アク … "新しい AirPods Pro が発表されたよ!" の続きを読む... [post_date_gmt] => 2019-10-29 13:18:41 [post_date] => 2019-10-29 13:18:41 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-10-29 13:18:41 [post_modified] => 2019-10-29 13:18:41 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => https://prinblog.com/?p=78 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => プリンのブログ [syndication_source_uri] => https://prinblog.com [syndication_source_id] => http://www.prinblog.com/feed/ [syndication_feed] => http://www.prinblog.com/feed/ [syndication_feed_id] => 104 [syndication_permalink] => https://prinblog.com/2019/10/29/22/18/41/78/diary/prin/%E6%96%B0%E3%81%97%E3%81%84-airpods-pro-%E3%81%8C%E7%99%BA%E8%A1%A8%E3%81%95%E3%82%8C%E3%81%9F%E3%82%88%EF%BC%81/ [syndication_item_hash] => e5dae20afd76a92389195b9bfb5c3f9a ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( [0] => 533 ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 1089 [1] => 899 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

Doing filter:faf_image_filter

Execute image filter

Image process

No image matches

Array ( )

Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => プリンのブログ [syndication_source_uri] => https://prinblog.com [syndication_source_id] => http://www.prinblog.com/feed/ [syndication_feed] => http://www.prinblog.com/feed/ [syndication_feed_id] => 104 [syndication_permalink] => https://prinblog.com/2019/10/29/22/18/41/78/diary/prin/%E6%96%B0%E3%81%97%E3%81%84-airpods-pro-%E3%81%8C%E7%99%BA%E8%A1%A8%E3%81%95%E3%82%8C%E3%81%9F%E3%82%88%EF%BC%81/ [syndication_item_hash] => e5dae20afd76a92389195b9bfb5c3f9a )

Execute : Enclosure images

Enclosure save:

Array ( [0] => )

No match on

Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :新しい AirPods Pro が発表されたよ!

Array ( [post_title] => 新しい AirPods Pro が発表されたよ! [post_content] => しれーっとAirPodsProが発表されましたね。 発売日は、10月30日らしいですが 見た目としては、はみ出ているうどんの部分が短くなった気がしますね。 そして今回私が今回一番気になっている機能は、何と言っても、「アク …

[post_excerpt] => しれーっとAirPodsProが発表されましたね。 発売日は、10月30日らしいですが 見た目としては、はみ出ているうどんの部分が短くなった気がしますね。 そして今回私が今回一番気になっている機能は、何と言っても、「アク … "新しい AirPods Pro が発表されたよ!" の続きを読む... [post_date_gmt] => 2019-10-29 13:18:41 [post_date] => 2019-10-29 13:18:41 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-10-29 13:18:41 [post_modified] => 2019-10-29 13:18:41 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => https://prinblog.com/?p=78 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => プリンのブログ [syndication_source_uri] => https://prinblog.com [syndication_source_id] => http://www.prinblog.com/feed/ [syndication_feed] => http://www.prinblog.com/feed/ [syndication_feed_id] => 104 [syndication_permalink] => https://prinblog.com/2019/10/29/22/18/41/78/diary/prin/%E6%96%B0%E3%81%97%E3%81%84-airpods-pro-%E3%81%8C%E7%99%BA%E8%A1%A8%E3%81%95%E3%82%8C%E3%81%9F%E3%82%88%EF%BC%81/ [syndication_item_hash] => e5dae20afd76a92389195b9bfb5c3f9a [faf_process_image] => ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( [0] => 533 ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 1089 [1] => 899 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )


Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /homepages/41/d79740523/htdocs/converternews/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/syndicatedlink.class.php on line 302

FAF deciding on filters on post to be syndicated:

sulaite Taiwan paper straw making mahcine

Array ( [post_title] => sulaite Taiwan paper straw making mahcine [post_content] =>

[post_date_gmt] => 2019-11-16 09:15:49 [post_date] => 2019-11-16 09:15:49 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-11-16 09:15:49 [post_modified] => 2019-11-16 09:15:49 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2019/11/16/sulaite-taiwan-paper-straw-making-mahcine/ [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Uncategorized – Converting Guide [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.convertingguide.com [syndication_source_id] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed_id] => 19 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2019/11/16/sulaite-taiwan-paper-straw-making-mahcine/ [syndication_item_hash] => a33c8c2016b88e5f994e04149e045cb0 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 10054 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

Doing filter:faf_image_filter

Execute image filter

Image process

No image matches

Array ( )

Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Uncategorized – Converting Guide [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.convertingguide.com [syndication_source_id] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed_id] => 19 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2019/11/16/sulaite-taiwan-paper-straw-making-mahcine/ [syndication_item_hash] => a33c8c2016b88e5f994e04149e045cb0 )

Execute : Enclosure images

Enclosure save:

Array ( [0] => )

No match on

Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :sulaite Taiwan paper straw making mahcine

Array ( [post_title] => sulaite Taiwan paper straw making mahcine [post_content] =>

[post_date_gmt] => 2019-11-16 09:15:49 [post_date] => 2019-11-16 09:15:49 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-11-16 09:15:49 [post_modified] => 2019-11-16 09:15:49 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2019/11/16/sulaite-taiwan-paper-straw-making-mahcine/ [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Uncategorized – Converting Guide [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.convertingguide.com [syndication_source_id] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed_id] => 19 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2019/11/16/sulaite-taiwan-paper-straw-making-mahcine/ [syndication_item_hash] => a33c8c2016b88e5f994e04149e045cb0 [faf_process_image] => ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 10054 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) [post_excerpt] => )

FAF deciding on filters on post to be syndicated:

Vietnam customer paper straw machine

Array ( [post_title] => Vietnam customer paper straw machine [post_content] =>

[post_date_gmt] => 2019-11-16 08:15:35 [post_date] => 2019-11-16 08:15:35 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-11-16 08:15:35 [post_modified] => 2019-11-16 08:15:35 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2019/11/16/vietnam-customer-paper-straw-machine/ [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Uncategorized – Converting Guide [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.convertingguide.com [syndication_source_id] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed_id] => 19 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2019/11/16/vietnam-customer-paper-straw-machine/ [syndication_item_hash] => 130776c58753724d4600c557eb85dbf1 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 10054 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

Doing filter:faf_image_filter

Execute image filter

Image process

No image matches

Array ( )

Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Uncategorized – Converting Guide [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.convertingguide.com [syndication_source_id] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed_id] => 19 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2019/11/16/vietnam-customer-paper-straw-machine/ [syndication_item_hash] => 130776c58753724d4600c557eb85dbf1 )

Execute : Enclosure images

Enclosure save:

Array ( [0] => )

No match on

Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :Vietnam customer paper straw machine

Array ( [post_title] => Vietnam customer paper straw machine [post_content] =>

[post_date_gmt] => 2019-11-16 08:15:35 [post_date] => 2019-11-16 08:15:35 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-11-16 08:15:35 [post_modified] => 2019-11-16 08:15:35 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2019/11/16/vietnam-customer-paper-straw-machine/ [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Uncategorized – Converting Guide [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.convertingguide.com [syndication_source_id] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed_id] => 19 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2019/11/16/vietnam-customer-paper-straw-machine/ [syndication_item_hash] => 130776c58753724d4600c557eb85dbf1 [faf_process_image] => ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 10054 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) [post_excerpt] => )

FAF deciding on filters on post to be syndicated:

2 colors pad printer with rotary jig

Array ( [post_title] => 2 colors pad printer with rotary jig [post_content] =>

[post_date_gmt] => 2019-11-16 02:44:36 [post_date] => 2019-11-16 02:44:36 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-11-16 02:44:36 [post_modified] => 2019-11-16 02:44:36 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2019/11/16/2-colors-pad-printer-with-rotary-jig/ [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Uncategorized – Converting Guide [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.convertingguide.com [syndication_source_id] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed_id] => 19 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2019/11/16/2-colors-pad-printer-with-rotary-jig/ [syndication_item_hash] => d314dd47e49c458ced0f460195025628 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 10054 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

Doing filter:faf_image_filter

Execute image filter

Image process

No image matches

Array ( )

Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Uncategorized – Converting Guide [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.convertingguide.com [syndication_source_id] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed_id] => 19 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2019/11/16/2-colors-pad-printer-with-rotary-jig/ [syndication_item_hash] => d314dd47e49c458ced0f460195025628 )

Execute : Enclosure images

Enclosure save:

Array ( [0] => )

No match on

Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :2 colors pad printer with rotary jig

Array ( [post_title] => 2 colors pad printer with rotary jig [post_content] =>

[post_date_gmt] => 2019-11-16 02:44:36 [post_date] => 2019-11-16 02:44:36 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-11-16 02:44:36 [post_modified] => 2019-11-16 02:44:36 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2019/11/16/2-colors-pad-printer-with-rotary-jig/ [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Uncategorized – Converting Guide [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.convertingguide.com [syndication_source_id] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed_id] => 19 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2019/11/16/2-colors-pad-printer-with-rotary-jig/ [syndication_item_hash] => d314dd47e49c458ced0f460195025628 [faf_process_image] => ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 10054 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) [post_excerpt] => )

FAF deciding on filters on post to be syndicated:

Paper Production in Wisconsin’s Paper Valley

Array ( [post_title] => Paper Production in Wisconsin’s Paper Valley [post_content] =>

[post_date_gmt] => 2019-11-15 20:14:12 [post_date] => 2019-11-15 20:14:12 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-11-15 20:14:12 [post_modified] => 2019-11-15 20:14:12 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2019/11/15/paper-production-in-wisconsins-paper-valley/ [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Uncategorized – Converting Guide [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.convertingguide.com [syndication_source_id] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed_id] => 19 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2019/11/15/paper-production-in-wisconsins-paper-valley/ [syndication_item_hash] => 474e812827ef7f688160693c7c25a4fc ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 10054 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

Doing filter:faf_image_filter

Execute image filter

Image process

No image matches

Array ( )

Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Uncategorized – Converting Guide [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.convertingguide.com [syndication_source_id] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed_id] => 19 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2019/11/15/paper-production-in-wisconsins-paper-valley/ [syndication_item_hash] => 474e812827ef7f688160693c7c25a4fc )

Execute : Enclosure images

Enclosure save:

Array ( [0] => )

No match on

Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :Paper Production in Wisconsin’s Paper Valley

Array ( [post_title] => Paper Production in Wisconsin’s Paper Valley [post_content] =>

[post_date_gmt] => 2019-11-15 20:14:12 [post_date] => 2019-11-15 20:14:12 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-11-15 20:14:12 [post_modified] => 2019-11-15 20:14:12 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2019/11/15/paper-production-in-wisconsins-paper-valley/ [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Uncategorized – Converting Guide [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.convertingguide.com [syndication_source_id] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed_id] => 19 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2019/11/15/paper-production-in-wisconsins-paper-valley/ [syndication_item_hash] => 474e812827ef7f688160693c7c25a4fc [faf_process_image] => ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 10054 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) [post_excerpt] => )

FAF deciding on filters on post to be syndicated:

How can mid-sized food suppliers deliver circular packaging solutions?

Array ( [post_title] => How can mid-sized food suppliers deliver circular packaging solutions? [post_content] =>

New research will analyze challenges and comparisons of companies in the Netherlands versus California, two hotbeds of environmental interest and responsibility.

 

People working in jobs related to producing, packaging, distributing and selling food products face increased sustainability demands. Such demands evolved over the past 50 years, starting in the 1970s (1). Current interest in sustainability remains high amongst packaging professionals as such articles are commonly read the most often in industry trade journals such as Packaging Digest (2).

Between North America and Europe today, there are 47 standards related to the sustainability of processed foods (3). While sustainable food production and packaging are similar to the notions of circular food production and circular packaging, they are not the same. Many publications over the past few years have compared the two types of practices, with a good summary given by Korhonen (4). It’s unfortunate that in the past century we have foregone our previous sustainable and sometime circular lifestyles that were common for hundreds of years in the past (5).

Sustainable packaging design focuses on developing eco-friendly designs and production strategies. Such practices tend to be linear and do not address imbalances between input and output streams, nor address the quality of recycling well.

Many sustainable packaging programs focus on material reduction, which sometimes results in complex materials such as (plastic) laminates. Such inseparable material combinations hinder the development of products and packaging for circular systems (6).

In countries in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), plastic package recycling rates vary between 10% for the USA to 50% for the Netherlands. The net result of this deficiency is a growing waste problem as shown in Figure 1.

A new motivation for circular plastics packaging stems from China and other Asian countries deciding to stop accepting and “processing” plastic waste from around the world. In fact, these policy changes from Asia have had a negative effect on plastics collections and recycling in many European and North American communities (7) (8).

Figure 1: Cumulative plastic waste generation and disposal (in millions of metric tons). Solid line shown historical data from 1950 to 2015; dashed lines show projections of historical trends to 2050. (Reprinted from Science Advances 19 Jul 2017: Vol. 3, no. 7, e1700782 DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.1700782.  Copyright The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Assn. for the Advancement of Science. Distributed under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License 4.0 (CC BY-NC) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/).

 

Currently, literature focuses on the theoretical implications of transition to circular systems, while practical examples of packaging concepts suited for circular systems are scarce (6). For example, reusable packaging is a circular concept that is still rarely implemented by food producing companies and value chains. But TerraCycle is carrying out some ambitious trials currently with some multi-national brand owners (9) (10).

This is not to say that leading circular design practices are not being taught at the universities that we are involved with—such as California Polytechnic University San Luis Obisbo, and the Dutch Technical Universities of Twente and Delft.

Further, most research and pilot projects about circular packaging solutions focus on the world’s largest food brand owners, with small- and medium-sized enterprises under-researched (6) (11). These larger companies control about 80% of the processed foods that appear on the shelves of typical grocery stores in North America and Europe (12).

____________________________________________________________________________________________

WestPack-2020  WestPack 2020: Ideas. Education. New Partners. Feb. 11-13

____________________________________________________________________________________________

Recently, there has been some motivational economic case studies about larger volume business-to-business (B2B) circular packaging solutions by the Reusable Packaging Assn. (13) and the Reusable Industrial Packaging Assn. (14). Thus, we are focusing our research on mid-sized companies in the food production chain, about which little work has been done.

We will focus our research geographically to California and the Netherlands. You may ask why.

First, California and the Netherlands both actively strive to enact and implement leading environmentally friendly policies and practices related to food production and packaging (see “History and current initiatives”below). The ambitions are leading compared to peers.

Second, both of these areas are world agriculture and food production powerhouses, with California the leading state in the USA, and the Netherlands the leading agriculture exporter in the European Union (15) (16). Thus, these two areas provide a rich ecosystem for our research efforts.

Both the Netherlands and California promote, or are starting to mandate, sustainable and circular packaging solutions for all industries including food.

Thus, by carrying out parallel studies in both areas, we can learn from each other when it comes to which factors are most and least important for realizing successful circular packaging solutions. Successful circular food packaging solutions require alignment and cooperation of numerous stakeholders, as discussed below. Solutions cannot be designed, implemented and rolled out in a vacuum.

 

Three drivers of circular food packaging

From our perspective, in Figure 2, we identify three issues that need further research to put out pilot projects related to circular food packaging in both countries.

The past few years, several organizations either surveyed or wrote about consumers’ behavior related to “sustainable” products or reusable packaging of branded products (including food) (17) (18). However, these surveys are not specific enough when it comes to identifying actual consumer behavior and needs of reusable food packaging solutions on a daily or weekly basis.

Further, retail grocery stores and foodservice providers will not facilitate most circular food packaging initiatives unless there is evidence of strong consumer buy-in over longer periods of time.

Figure 2: Drivers of Circular Food Packaging

 

Even if consumers are willing to change their behavior relative to circular-friendly packaging, economically it needs to make sense for all parties involved in the supply chain. Economic gain is difficult to substantiate and is a topic widely research and written about. Understanding the value propositions of certain kinds of circular practices can be difficult for traditional investors and banks (19).

In the Netherlands, the three biggest banks launched guidelines in 2018 for creating a common framework for financing circular economy initiatives by industry (20). Thus, there is some movement by the financial community to address the economic viability of new initiatives. However, most likely most actual projects will have to be financed by individual companies in the value chains, with perhaps consumers having to pay more for their packaged food product(s) as well.

Lastly, we need to consider the closed-loop environment impact of any new circular packaging solutions. The solution may be wanted and acceptable to consumers, and it may be profitable for the delivery value chain, but the environmental impact also needs careful consideration.

The problem with life-cycle assessment (LCA) for our research is the lack of agreement on the proper frameworks to use in carrying out the analysis (21). There are numerous frameworks and tools like COMPASS for carrying out LCA. Any LCA needs to also consider food waste, and how the results can be communicated to consumers and members of the value chain to convince them to cooperate in new initiatives.

 

Current research focus and ambitions

Our research in the Netherlands and California will focus on the following four research topic in the next two years:

1. Consumers:

• Characterize consumer behavior/needs toward specific circular packaged food products in the Netherlands and California.

• Understand consumer attitudes towards reuse, co-use or refill offerings of specific foods.

 

2. Mid-sized Food Producers:

• Identify appropriate mid-sized food suppliers and their value chains that are ripe for moving forward with circular food packaging initiatives.

• Inventory the needs of mid-sized food producers with regard to circular economy ambitions.

• Determine operational needs and technical requirements from the food producer to consumer.

 

3. Retail Grocery / Foodservice Value Chains:

• Characterize economic needs and costs from the retail perspective.

• Inventory needs of downstream members of value chain concerning distribution and reverse logistics issues related to reuse, refill, co-use, re-appropriate or recycling.

 

4. LCA, Economics and Pilot Project(s):

• Propose a circular model for one or more food products in California and the Netherlands (including economics, costs, investments needed, life cycle assessment).

• Establish a consortium of companies in the Netherlands and California willing to carry out a pilot project for the circular model proposed.

• Measure consumer behavior to the new circularly packaged food compared to non-circularly packaged food.

• Characterize and pursue additional sources of funding for implementing the pilot project for the consortium of companies.

• Learn from comparisons and contrasts between the Netherlands and California.

We intend to publish the results of research topics one to three in the first half of 2020 in  Packaging Digest. Depending upon consumer cooperation, we intend to further publish the results of our field trials at the end of 2020.  

At this time, we are looking for mid-sized (fresh) food producers, retail grocery chains, logistics service providers, and packaging companies in California and Northwest Europe to join our research and pilot project efforts in 2020. Interested companies in these areas can contact us via this form

____________________________________________________________________________________________

WestPack-2020  WestPack 2020: Ideas. Education. New Partners. Feb. 11-13

____________________________________________________________________________________________

History and current initiatives

In past centuries, most products were recycled or reused, as there was perpetual scarcity of food and packaging materials (5). Thus, recycling focused beyond metal, paperboard and glass, to include porcelain/clay jars, cotton bags and wooden boxes amongst other packaging materials.

Over the past 100 years, in most countries of the world, food scarcity subsided, and efficient industrial production created mass-produced raw materials and packages for food production and distribution. During the 20th century, plastic packaging was also introduced into the food supply chain. The net result of this has been less food waste, more consumer choice and convenience, longer supply chains, and much lower prices for food.

As packaging pollution increases worldwide, numerous government and non-profit organizations are implementing laws and initiatives to turn the tide against simple linear production of food. Recent Extended Product Responsibility (ERP) policies extend a manufacturer’s responsibility for reducing packaging impacts downstream, when consumers are done with them (22) (23). Over the past 30 years, more than 300 ERP laws have been passed and implemented in both the European Union and in the USA, with a good overview provided by CalRecycle (24) and OECD (25). Of these laws, only 17% of them are related to actual packaging.

The OECD reports that in the European Union recycling rates of packaging vary between 29% and 84% in 2014, with a target of 55% for all plastic waste by 2025. In 2016, in the European Union, recycling of plastic packaging reached a level of 40.8% and, for the first time, recycling rates exceeded energy recovery and landfill rates (26). Collection of plastic packaging in the Netherlands is higher, close to 50% in 2019 (27), but unfortunately only 35% of the collected waste ends up being recycled into new plastic, resulting in a yield of only 17%.

There are several reasons for such a low yield, which are beyond the scope of this article. But some of the main limitations behind using recycled plastics for food are:

• Food safety requirements for recycled plastics used for food (28) (29).

• Competition in undifferentiated markets for recycled plastic versus virgin plastics (30).

• Many new virgin plastics production plants coming online driven by cheap natural gas prices, resulting in cheap virgin materials (31).

Now let’s look at specific initiative and activities in California and the Netherlands.

Recently, in California, a new Senate Bill (SB-54) called California Circular Economy and Plastic Pollution Reduction Act is going through committee processes (32). The goal of this law is to achieve 75% recycling rates by 2030, and to reduce single-use packaging by 75%. Currently, in California less than 9% of plastic is recycled.

Historically, California has depended on exporting plastics and paper packaging streams to China and other countries—which is no longer possible. It’s noteworthy that about 75 organizations in and outside the state support the new bill, while seven major organizations—including the Grocery Manufacturers Assn., Plastics Industry Assn. and Household and Commercial Products Assn.—oppose the new bill.

A longer campaign has existed to educate California consumers and small- and medium-sized businesses about reusables for food products and food production. The Use Reusables campaign is a joint project of Alameda County (CA) public agency  and the Reusable Packaging Assn. (RPA). Launched in 2007, the campaign’s goal is to help businesses and institutions assess and optimize the transport packaging materials and systems they use, either within their manufacturing process or for product distribution (33). Thus far, the focus has been on totes, crates, intermediate bulk containers and reusable strapping to secure bundled bulk pallets of products in business-to-business (B2B) closed-loop deliveries.

In the Netherlands, the government launched the program A Circular Economy in the Netherlands by 2050 in September 2016. In this program, a nationwide plan is drawn up by multiple ministries to function as a vision for the successful implementation of the circular economy. The goal formulated in this report is to reduce the amount of primary resources used in the Netherlands by 50% in 2030, and to become completely circular by 2050 (34). In addition, the government facilitated the creation and support of the website Holland Circular Hotspot. It is a private public platform in which companies, knowledge institutes and (local) authorities collaborate internationally to exchange knowledge and stimulate entrepreneurship in the field of circular economy (35).

In 2014, as part of the Dutch government’s efforts to ramp up extended producer responsibility of packaging, the “Packaging Waste Fund” was established by producers and importers. This fund’s purpose is to collectively meet the extended producer responsibilities as stated in the national Packaging Decree and Packaging Agreement between industry and the government. It is a not-for-profit organization governed by a board of directors, who are themselves appointed by producers and importers (36).

Thus, as of 2018, all producers and importers of end-user consumer packaged products must pay levies into the waste fund, which vary between 2 and 78 euro-cents per kilogram (Note: B2B logistics packaging is not included) (37). Manufacturers packaging consumer products can qualify for lower levies if they agree to use a certain percentage of recycled content in their packages. Thus, economic incentives are being created to use recycled streams of materials. This organization reports that, in 2017, the Dutch recycled 87% of paper and paperboard, 86% glass, 95% metal, 73% wood and 50% plastic.

The Packaging Waste Fund resulted in the creation of the Netherlands Institute for Sustainable Packaging (KIDV), which is funded for 10 years at 2M euros per year by the fund. The KIDV employs a staff of 16 and acts as a national clearing house for developing, sharing and bringing knowledge together in the form of events, collaborative research, tools and expert advice (38). The KIDV is similar to the non-profit member-supported American Sustainable Packaging Coalition, which has been active since 2004.

A lot of the KIDV’s current activities focus on plastics, as the Netherlands already recycles a majority of non-plastics. For example, last July, they initiated a Community of Practice (CoP) with a consortium of companies facing similar challenges related to developing metallized flexible packaging that is suitable for the circular economy (39). The government decided that one of the five focus areas of its circular economy initiatives should focus on plastics.

In private industry, in February 2019, Dutch Grocery Store Organization made up of 24 corporate members agreed to reducing all packaging in their retail stores by 20% by 2025 (40). Initial efforts will focus on fruits and vegetables and on increasing recycled content of packaging. Another organization, MVO (Dutch Foundation for Socially Responsible Entrepreneurship) is also working on facilitating circular economy projects and matchmaking between companies. Their Future Proof Community website has more than 3,500 companies and acts as a matchmaker for companies that put out sustainable or circular challenges and companies suggesting solutions (41).

    

 

REFERENCES

1. Kidd, Charles V. The evolution of sustainability. J Agric Environ Ethics, Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1992. Vol. 1.

2. Lingle, Rick. Packaging Digest, Jul. 15, 2019. Sustainability drives the top five in food and beverage packaging.

3. International Trade Centre. Sustainability Map. All processed foods in Europe and North America.

4. Jouni Korhonena, Cali Nuurb, Andreas Feldmann, Seyoum Eshetu Birkiea. Circular economy as an essentially contested concept. Journal of Cleaner Production, Elsivier, Feb. 25, 2018. Vol. 175.

5. Trentmann, Frank. Empire of Things. Penquin Random House UK Books, 2016, pp. 624-654.

6. Bjorn de Koeijer, Renee Wever, Jorg Henseler. Realizing Product-Packaging Combinations in Circular Systems: Shaping the Research Agenda. 2017, Vol. 30.

7. Katz, Cheryl. Piling Up: How China’s Ban on Importing Waste Has Stalled Global Recycling. Yale University, Yale School of Forrestry & Environmental Studies, Mar. 7, 2019.

8. Erin McCormick, Charlotte Simmonds, Jessica Glenza, Katharine Gammon. Americans’ plastic recycling is dumped in landfills, investigation shows. The Guardian. Jun. 21, 2019.

9. Makower, Joel. Loop’s launch brings reusable packaging to the world’s biggest brands. GreenBiz Group, Jan. 24, 2019.

10. Devenyns, Jessi. Why reuseable food packaging has a promising future. FoodDive, Jun. 25, 2019.

11. Szaky, Tom. The Future of Packaging. Oakland: Berrett-Koehler Publishsers Inc., 2019.

12. Kramer, Anna. These 10 companies make a lot of the food we buy. Here’s how we made them better. Oxfam. [Online] Dec. 10, 2014. [Cited: Jul. 25, 2019.] https://www.oxfamamerica.org/explore/stories/these-10-companies-make-a-lot-of-the-food-we-buy-heres-how-we-made-them-better/.

13. Reusable Packaging Assn. A cost comparison model for reusable transport packaging. 102, June 2016.

14. Studies and Report. Reusable Industrial Packaging Assn. [Online] Aug. 18, 2019. [Cited: Aug. 18, 2019.] https://www.reusablepackaging.org/studies-and-reports/.

15. National Geographic. Tiny Country Feeds the World. September 2017.

16. California Department of Food and Agriculture. California Agricultural Production Statistics. 2017.

17. Wharton University of Pennsylvania. Reusable Packaging from Big Brands: Will Consumers Buy In? Wharton Business School, Knowledge@Wharton, Feb. 12, 2019.

18. Nielson. Consumer-Goods’ Brands That Demonstrate Commitment To Sustainability Outperform Those That Don’t. [Webpage]. Oct. 12, 2015.

19. Judith Kas, Bram Bet & Daphne Truijens. Barriers and Best Practices for the Circular Economy. SMO Promovendi. Circular Minds 2017-2018.

20. Rabobank Nederland. ABN AMRO, ING and Rabobank launch finance guidelines for circular economy. Rabobank Nederland Press Releases. [Online] Jul. 9, 2018. [Cited: Aug. 25, 2019.] https://www.rabobank.com/en/press/search/2018/20180702-abn-amro-ing-and-rabobank-launch-finance-guidelines-for-circular-economy.html.

21. Erik Pauer*, Bernhard Wohner, Victoria Heinrich and Manfred Tacker.Assessing the Environmental Sustainability of Food Packaging: An Extended Life Cycle Assessment including Packaging-Related Food Losses and Waste and Circularity Assessment. Basel: MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland, 11 2019, Sustainability, p. 925. Section of Packaging Technology and Resource Management, University of Applied Science, 1030 Vienna.

22. European Union. Closing the loop: Commission adopts ambitious new Circular Economy Package to boost competitiveness, create jobs and generate sustainable growth. Brussels: European Union, Dec. 2, 2015.

23. California Product Stewardship Counsel. California ERP Legislation. https://www.calpsc.org/.[Online] Aug. 13, 2019. [Cited: Aug. 13, 2019.] https://www.calpsc.org/legislation.

24. CalRecycle California Goverment. California Recylce Policy and Law. [Online] Jul. 19, 2019. [Cited: Aug. 13, 2019.] https://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/epr/policylaw.

25. OECD. OECD (2016), Extended Producer Responsibility: Updated Guidance for Efficient Waste Management, OECD Publishing, Paris. [Online] Sept. 16, 2016. [Cited: Aug. 13, 2019.] https://www.oecd-ilibrary.org/sites/9789264256385-4-en/index.html?itemId=/content/component/9789264256385-4-en.

26. PlasticsEurope Assn. of Plastics Manufacturers. Plastics the Facts 2017. European Assn. of Plastics Manufacturers, 2018.

27. Berenschot, Joost Krebbekx and Gijs Duivenvoorde – and Innovation, Siem Haffmans – Partners for. Roadmap towards increasing the sustainability of plastics packaging. NRK Verpakkingen, 2018. p. 74.

28. European Food Safety Authority. Plastics and Plastics Recycling. [Online] [Cited: Aug. 24, 2019.] https://www.efsa.europa.eu/en/topics/topic/plastics-and-plastic-recycling.

29. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Recycled Plastics in Food Packaging. [Online] Mar. 21, 2018. [Cited: Aug. 24, 2019.] https://www.fda.gov/food/packaging-food-contact-substances-fcs/recycled-plastics-food-packaging.

30. OECD. Improving Markets for Recycled Plastics: Trends, Prospects and Policy Responses,. Paris : OECD, 2018.

31. Project, The Climate Reality, [prod.]. Ethane Cracker Plants What Are They. Washington D.C.: The Climate Reality Project, Oct. 23, 2018.

32. Senators Allen, Skinner, Stern and Wiener. SB-54 California Circular Economy and Plastics Pollution Reduction Act. [leginfo.legislature.ca.gov]. Sacramento, California, USA : California State Legislature, Aug. 14, 2019.

33. Reusables Organization About Page. Usereusables Organization. [Online] [Cited: Aug. 18, 2019.] http://usereusables.org/about-reusables.

34. Dutch Ministry of Infrastructure and the Environment and the Ministry of Economic Affairs. The Circular Economy. Den Haag: September 2016.

35. TNO. Holland Circular Hotspot Home Page. Holland Circular Hotspot. [Online] 2019. [Cited: Aug. 21, 2019.] https://hollandcircularhotspot.nl/en/.

36. Dutch Packaging Waste Fund Home Page. Afvalfondsverpakkingen.nl. [Online] 2019. https://afvalfondsverpakkingen.nl/en/packaging-waste-fund.

37. Policy Afvalfonds Verpakkingen (Packaging Waste Fund). Afvalfondsverpakkingen.nl. [Online] Dec. 20, 2018. [Cited: Aug. 21, 2019.] https://afvalfondsverpakkingen.nl/a/i/Beleid-Overeenkomsten/Policy-2019.pdf.

38. KIDV. Organizational Structure. KIDV Netherlands Institute for Sustainable Packaging. [Online] [Cited: Aug. 21, 2019.] https://www.kidv.nl/228/over-het-kidv.html?ch=EN#organizational-structure.

39. Netherlands Institute for Sustainable Packaging (KIDV). Brand owners combine forces to address challenges to make flexible packaging circular. Jul. 16, 2019. Press Release.

40. Centraal Bureau Levensmiddelenhandel (CBL). 20% minder verpakkingen in de supermarkt in 2025. CBL Laaste Nieuws . [Online] Feb. 15, 2019. [Cited: Aug. 25, 2019.] https://www.cbl.nl/consumenten-hebben-weer-vertrouwen-in-de-supermarkt-2/.

41. MOV Nederland. Future Proof Community. Future Proof Community. [Online] Aug. 24, 2019. [Cited: Aug. 24, 2019.] https://futureproof.community/.

____________________________________________________________________________________________

Fist-bumpFind your success! Subscribe to free Packaging Digest enewsletters.

 

[post_excerpt] => New research will analyze challenges and comparisons of companies in the Netherlands versus California, two hotbeds of environmental interest and responsibility.   People working in jobs related to producing, packaging, distributing and selling food products face increased sustainability demands. Such demands evolved over the past 50 years, starting in the 1970s (1). Current interest in […] [post_date_gmt] => 2019-11-15 16:14:31 [post_date] => 2019-11-15 16:14:31 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-11-15 16:14:31 [post_modified] => 2019-11-15 16:14:31 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2019/11/15/how-can-mid-sized-food-suppliers-deliver-circular-packaging-solutions/ [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Uncategorized – Converting Guide [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.convertingguide.com [syndication_source_id] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed_id] => 19 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2019/11/15/how-can-mid-sized-food-suppliers-deliver-circular-packaging-solutions/ [syndication_item_hash] => 75623eb20b8e8a68efeae7906a32db66 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 10054 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

Doing filter:faf_image_filter

Execute image filter

Image process

Local save:https://www.convertingguide.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/www.packagingdigest.comSzanto-Fig-1-72dpi-68f7912aa234a57471cffeee429d10d98994672f.jpg

Image process :: Saving local image

grab remote location : https://www.convertingguide.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/www.packagingdigest.comSzanto-Fig-1-72dpi-68f7912aa234a57471cffeee429d10d98994672f.jpg

Image exists, checking for same file size

Replacing images : - ON

New research will analyze challenges and comparisons of companies in the Netherlands versus California, two hotbeds of environmental interest and responsibility.

 

People working in jobs related to producing, packaging, distributing and selling food products face increased sustainability demands. Such demands evolved over the past 50 years, starting in the 1970s (1). Current interest in sustainability remains high amongst packaging professionals as such articles are commonly read the most often in industry trade journals such as Packaging Digest (2).

Between North America and Europe today, there are 47 standards related to the sustainability of processed foods (3). While sustainable food production and packaging are similar to the notions of circular food production and circular packaging, they are not the same. Many publications over the past few years have compared the two types of practices, with a good summary given by Korhonen (4). It’s unfortunate that in the past century we have foregone our previous sustainable and sometime circular lifestyles that were common for hundreds of years in the past (5).

Sustainable packaging design focuses on developing eco-friendly designs and production strategies. Such practices tend to be linear and do not address imbalances between input and output streams, nor address the quality of recycling well.

Many sustainable packaging programs focus on material reduction, which sometimes results in complex materials such as (plastic) laminates. Such inseparable material combinations hinder the development of products and packaging for circular systems (6).

In countries in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), plastic package recycling rates vary between 10% for the USA to 50% for the Netherlands. The net result of this deficiency is a growing waste problem as shown in Figure 1.

A new motivation for circular plastics packaging stems from China and other Asian countries deciding to stop accepting and “processing” plastic waste from around the world. In fact, these policy changes from Asia have had a negative effect on plastics collections and recycling in many European and North American communities (7) (8).

Figure 1: Cumulative plastic waste generation and disposal (in millions of metric tons). Solid line shown historical data from 1950 to 2015; dashed lines show projections of historical trends to 2050. (Reprinted from Science Advances 19 Jul 2017: Vol. 3, no. 7, e1700782 DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.1700782.  Copyright The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Assn. for the Advancement of Science. Distributed under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License 4.0 (CC BY-NC) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/).

 

Currently, literature focuses on the theoretical implications of transition to circular systems, while practical examples of packaging concepts suited for circular systems are scarce (6). For example, reusable packaging is a circular concept that is still rarely implemented by food producing companies and value chains. But TerraCycle is carrying out some ambitious trials currently with some multi-national brand owners (9) (10).

This is not to say that leading circular design practices are not being taught at the universities that we are involved with—such as California Polytechnic University San Luis Obisbo, and the Dutch Technical Universities of Twente and Delft.

Further, most research and pilot projects about circular packaging solutions focus on the world’s largest food brand owners, with small- and medium-sized enterprises under-researched (6) (11). These larger companies control about 80% of the processed foods that appear on the shelves of typical grocery stores in North America and Europe (12).

____________________________________________________________________________________________

WestPack-2020  WestPack 2020: Ideas. Education. New Partners. Feb. 11-13

____________________________________________________________________________________________

Recently, there has been some motivational economic case studies about larger volume business-to-business (B2B) circular packaging solutions by the Reusable Packaging Assn. (13) and the Reusable Industrial Packaging Assn. (14). Thus, we are focusing our research on mid-sized companies in the food production chain, about which little work has been done.

We will focus our research geographically to California and the Netherlands. You may ask why.

First, California and the Netherlands both actively strive to enact and implement leading environmentally friendly policies and practices related to food production and packaging (see “History and current initiatives”below). The ambitions are leading compared to peers.

Second, both of these areas are world agriculture and food production powerhouses, with California the leading state in the USA, and the Netherlands the leading agriculture exporter in the European Union (15) (16). Thus, these two areas provide a rich ecosystem for our research efforts.

Both the Netherlands and California promote, or are starting to mandate, sustainable and circular packaging solutions for all industries including food.

Thus, by carrying out parallel studies in both areas, we can learn from each other when it comes to which factors are most and least important for realizing successful circular packaging solutions. Successful circular food packaging solutions require alignment and cooperation of numerous stakeholders, as discussed below. Solutions cannot be designed, implemented and rolled out in a vacuum.

 

Three drivers of circular food packaging

From our perspective, in Figure 2, we identify three issues that need further research to put out pilot projects related to circular food packaging in both countries.

The past few years, several organizations either surveyed or wrote about consumers’ behavior related to “sustainable” products or reusable packaging of branded products (including food) (17) (18). However, these surveys are not specific enough when it comes to identifying actual consumer behavior and needs of reusable food packaging solutions on a daily or weekly basis.

Further, retail grocery stores and foodservice providers will not facilitate most circular food packaging initiatives unless there is evidence of strong consumer buy-in over longer periods of time.

Figure 2: Drivers of Circular Food Packaging

 

Even if consumers are willing to change their behavior relative to circular-friendly packaging, economically it needs to make sense for all parties involved in the supply chain. Economic gain is difficult to substantiate and is a topic widely research and written about. Understanding the value propositions of certain kinds of circular practices can be difficult for traditional investors and banks (19).

In the Netherlands, the three biggest banks launched guidelines in 2018 for creating a common framework for financing circular economy initiatives by industry (20). Thus, there is some movement by the financial community to address the economic viability of new initiatives. However, most likely most actual projects will have to be financed by individual companies in the value chains, with perhaps consumers having to pay more for their packaged food product(s) as well.

Lastly, we need to consider the closed-loop environment impact of any new circular packaging solutions. The solution may be wanted and acceptable to consumers, and it may be profitable for the delivery value chain, but the environmental impact also needs careful consideration.

The problem with life-cycle assessment (LCA) for our research is the lack of agreement on the proper frameworks to use in carrying out the analysis (21). There are numerous frameworks and tools like COMPASS for carrying out LCA. Any LCA needs to also consider food waste, and how the results can be communicated to consumers and members of the value chain to convince them to cooperate in new initiatives.

 

Current research focus and ambitions

Our research in the Netherlands and California will focus on the following four research topic in the next two years:

1. Consumers:

• Characterize consumer behavior/needs toward specific circular packaged food products in the Netherlands and California.

• Understand consumer attitudes towards reuse, co-use or refill offerings of specific foods.

 

2. Mid-sized Food Producers:

• Identify appropriate mid-sized food suppliers and their value chains that are ripe for moving forward with circular food packaging initiatives.

• Inventory the needs of mid-sized food producers with regard to circular economy ambitions.

• Determine operational needs and technical requirements from the food producer to consumer.

 

3. Retail Grocery / Foodservice Value Chains:

• Characterize economic needs and costs from the retail perspective.

• Inventory needs of downstream members of value chain concerning distribution and reverse logistics issues related to reuse, refill, co-use, re-appropriate or recycling.

 

4. LCA, Economics and Pilot Project(s):

• Propose a circular model for one or more food products in California and the Netherlands (including economics, costs, investments needed, life cycle assessment).

• Establish a consortium of companies in the Netherlands and California willing to carry out a pilot project for the circular model proposed.

• Measure consumer behavior to the new circularly packaged food compared to non-circularly packaged food.

• Characterize and pursue additional sources of funding for implementing the pilot project for the consortium of companies.

• Learn from comparisons and contrasts between the Netherlands and California.

We intend to publish the results of research topics one to three in the first half of 2020 in  Packaging Digest. Depending upon consumer cooperation, we intend to further publish the results of our field trials at the end of 2020.  

At this time, we are looking for mid-sized (fresh) food producers, retail grocery chains, logistics service providers, and packaging companies in California and Northwest Europe to join our research and pilot project efforts in 2020. Interested companies in these areas can contact us via this form

____________________________________________________________________________________________

WestPack-2020  WestPack 2020: Ideas. Education. New Partners. Feb. 11-13

____________________________________________________________________________________________

History and current initiatives

In past centuries, most products were recycled or reused, as there was perpetual scarcity of food and packaging materials (5). Thus, recycling focused beyond metal, paperboard and glass, to include porcelain/clay jars, cotton bags and wooden boxes amongst other packaging materials.

Over the past 100 years, in most countries of the world, food scarcity subsided, and efficient industrial production created mass-produced raw materials and packages for food production and distribution. During the 20th century, plastic packaging was also introduced into the food supply chain. The net result of this has been less food waste, more consumer choice and convenience, longer supply chains, and much lower prices for food.

As packaging pollution increases worldwide, numerous government and non-profit organizations are implementing laws and initiatives to turn the tide against simple linear production of food. Recent Extended Product Responsibility (ERP) policies extend a manufacturer’s responsibility for reducing packaging impacts downstream, when consumers are done with them (22) (23). Over the past 30 years, more than 300 ERP laws have been passed and implemented in both the European Union and in the USA, with a good overview provided by CalRecycle (24) and OECD (25). Of these laws, only 17% of them are related to actual packaging.

The OECD reports that in the European Union recycling rates of packaging vary between 29% and 84% in 2014, with a target of 55% for all plastic waste by 2025. In 2016, in the European Union, recycling of plastic packaging reached a level of 40.8% and, for the first time, recycling rates exceeded energy recovery and landfill rates (26). Collection of plastic packaging in the Netherlands is higher, close to 50% in 2019 (27), but unfortunately only 35% of the collected waste ends up being recycled into new plastic, resulting in a yield of only 17%.

There are several reasons for such a low yield, which are beyond the scope of this article. But some of the main limitations behind using recycled plastics for food are:

• Food safety requirements for recycled plastics used for food (28) (29).

• Competition in undifferentiated markets for recycled plastic versus virgin plastics (30).

• Many new virgin plastics production plants coming online driven by cheap natural gas prices, resulting in cheap virgin materials (31).

Now let’s look at specific initiative and activities in California and the Netherlands.

Recently, in California, a new Senate Bill (SB-54) called California Circular Economy and Plastic Pollution Reduction Act is going through committee processes (32). The goal of this law is to achieve 75% recycling rates by 2030, and to reduce single-use packaging by 75%. Currently, in California less than 9% of plastic is recycled.

Historically, California has depended on exporting plastics and paper packaging streams to China and other countries—which is no longer possible. It’s noteworthy that about 75 organizations in and outside the state support the new bill, while seven major organizations—including the Grocery Manufacturers Assn., Plastics Industry Assn. and Household and Commercial Products Assn.—oppose the new bill.

A longer campaign has existed to educate California consumers and small- and medium-sized businesses about reusables for food products and food production. The Use Reusables campaign is a joint project of Alameda County (CA) public agency  and the Reusable Packaging Assn. (RPA). Launched in 2007, the campaign’s goal is to help businesses and institutions assess and optimize the transport packaging materials and systems they use, either within their manufacturing process or for product distribution (33). Thus far, the focus has been on totes, crates, intermediate bulk containers and reusable strapping to secure bundled bulk pallets of products in business-to-business (B2B) closed-loop deliveries.

In the Netherlands, the government launched the program A Circular Economy in the Netherlands by 2050 in September 2016. In this program, a nationwide plan is drawn up by multiple ministries to function as a vision for the successful implementation of the circular economy. The goal formulated in this report is to reduce the amount of primary resources used in the Netherlands by 50% in 2030, and to become completely circular by 2050 (34). In addition, the government facilitated the creation and support of the website Holland Circular Hotspot. It is a private public platform in which companies, knowledge institutes and (local) authorities collaborate internationally to exchange knowledge and stimulate entrepreneurship in the field of circular economy (35).

In 2014, as part of the Dutch government’s efforts to ramp up extended producer responsibility of packaging, the “Packaging Waste Fund” was established by producers and importers. This fund’s purpose is to collectively meet the extended producer responsibilities as stated in the national Packaging Decree and Packaging Agreement between industry and the government. It is a not-for-profit organization governed by a board of directors, who are themselves appointed by producers and importers (36).

Thus, as of 2018, all producers and importers of end-user consumer packaged products must pay levies into the waste fund, which vary between 2 and 78 euro-cents per kilogram (Note: B2B logistics packaging is not included) (37). Manufacturers packaging consumer products can qualify for lower levies if they agree to use a certain percentage of recycled content in their packages. Thus, economic incentives are being created to use recycled streams of materials. This organization reports that, in 2017, the Dutch recycled 87% of paper and paperboard, 86% glass, 95% metal, 73% wood and 50% plastic.

The Packaging Waste Fund resulted in the creation of the Netherlands Institute for Sustainable Packaging (KIDV), which is funded for 10 years at 2M euros per year by the fund. The KIDV employs a staff of 16 and acts as a national clearing house for developing, sharing and bringing knowledge together in the form of events, collaborative research, tools and expert advice (38). The KIDV is similar to the non-profit member-supported American Sustainable Packaging Coalition, which has been active since 2004.

A lot of the KIDV’s current activities focus on plastics, as the Netherlands already recycles a majority of non-plastics. For example, last July, they initiated a Community of Practice (CoP) with a consortium of companies facing similar challenges related to developing metallized flexible packaging that is suitable for the circular economy (39). The government decided that one of the five focus areas of its circular economy initiatives should focus on plastics.

In private industry, in February 2019, Dutch Grocery Store Organization made up of 24 corporate members agreed to reducing all packaging in their retail stores by 20% by 2025 (40). Initial efforts will focus on fruits and vegetables and on increasing recycled content of packaging. Another organization, MVO (Dutch Foundation for Socially Responsible Entrepreneurship) is also working on facilitating circular economy projects and matchmaking between companies. Their Future Proof Community website has more than 3,500 companies and acts as a matchmaker for companies that put out sustainable or circular challenges and companies suggesting solutions (41).

    

 

REFERENCES

1. Kidd, Charles V. The evolution of sustainability. J Agric Environ Ethics, Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1992. Vol. 1.

2. Lingle, Rick. Packaging Digest, Jul. 15, 2019. Sustainability drives the top five in food and beverage packaging.

3. International Trade Centre. Sustainability Map. All processed foods in Europe and North America.

4. Jouni Korhonena, Cali Nuurb, Andreas Feldmann, Seyoum Eshetu Birkiea. Circular economy as an essentially contested concept. Journal of Cleaner Production, Elsivier, Feb. 25, 2018. Vol. 175.

5. Trentmann, Frank. Empire of Things. Penquin Random House UK Books, 2016, pp. 624-654.

6. Bjorn de Koeijer, Renee Wever, Jorg Henseler. Realizing Product-Packaging Combinations in Circular Systems: Shaping the Research Agenda. 2017, Vol. 30.

7. Katz, Cheryl. Piling Up: How China’s Ban on Importing Waste Has Stalled Global Recycling. Yale University, Yale School of Forrestry & Environmental Studies, Mar. 7, 2019.

8. Erin McCormick, Charlotte Simmonds, Jessica Glenza, Katharine Gammon. Americans’ plastic recycling is dumped in landfills, investigation shows. The Guardian. Jun. 21, 2019.

9. Makower, Joel. Loop’s launch brings reusable packaging to the world’s biggest brands. GreenBiz Group, Jan. 24, 2019.

10. Devenyns, Jessi. Why reuseable food packaging has a promising future. FoodDive, Jun. 25, 2019.

11. Szaky, Tom. The Future of Packaging. Oakland: Berrett-Koehler Publishsers Inc., 2019.

12. Kramer, Anna. These 10 companies make a lot of the food we buy. Here’s how we made them better. Oxfam. [Online] Dec. 10, 2014. [Cited: Jul. 25, 2019.] https://www.oxfamamerica.org/explore/stories/these-10-companies-make-a-lot-of-the-food-we-buy-heres-how-we-made-them-better/.

13. Reusable Packaging Assn. A cost comparison model for reusable transport packaging. 102, June 2016.

14. Studies and Report. Reusable Industrial Packaging Assn. [Online] Aug. 18, 2019. [Cited: Aug. 18, 2019.] https://www.reusablepackaging.org/studies-and-reports/.

15. National Geographic. Tiny Country Feeds the World. September 2017.

16. California Department of Food and Agriculture. California Agricultural Production Statistics. 2017.

17. Wharton University of Pennsylvania. Reusable Packaging from Big Brands: Will Consumers Buy In? Wharton Business School, Knowledge@Wharton, Feb. 12, 2019.

18. Nielson. Consumer-Goods’ Brands That Demonstrate Commitment To Sustainability Outperform Those That Don’t. [Webpage]. Oct. 12, 2015.

19. Judith Kas, Bram Bet & Daphne Truijens. Barriers and Best Practices for the Circular Economy. SMO Promovendi. Circular Minds 2017-2018.

20. Rabobank Nederland. ABN AMRO, ING and Rabobank launch finance guidelines for circular economy. Rabobank Nederland Press Releases. [Online] Jul. 9, 2018. [Cited: Aug. 25, 2019.] https://www.rabobank.com/en/press/search/2018/20180702-abn-amro-ing-and-rabobank-launch-finance-guidelines-for-circular-economy.html.

21. Erik Pauer*, Bernhard Wohner, Victoria Heinrich and Manfred Tacker.Assessing the Environmental Sustainability of Food Packaging: An Extended Life Cycle Assessment including Packaging-Related Food Losses and Waste and Circularity Assessment. Basel: MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland, 11 2019, Sustainability, p. 925. Section of Packaging Technology and Resource Management, University of Applied Science, 1030 Vienna.

22. European Union. Closing the loop: Commission adopts ambitious new Circular Economy Package to boost competitiveness, create jobs and generate sustainable growth. Brussels: European Union, Dec. 2, 2015.

23. California Product Stewardship Counsel. California ERP Legislation. https://www.calpsc.org/.[Online] Aug. 13, 2019. [Cited: Aug. 13, 2019.] https://www.calpsc.org/legislation.

24. CalRecycle California Goverment. California Recylce Policy and Law. [Online] Jul. 19, 2019. [Cited: Aug. 13, 2019.] https://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/epr/policylaw.

25. OECD. OECD (2016), Extended Producer Responsibility: Updated Guidance for Efficient Waste Management, OECD Publishing, Paris. [Online] Sept. 16, 2016. [Cited: Aug. 13, 2019.] https://www.oecd-ilibrary.org/sites/9789264256385-4-en/index.html?itemId=/content/component/9789264256385-4-en.

26. PlasticsEurope Assn. of Plastics Manufacturers. Plastics the Facts 2017. European Assn. of Plastics Manufacturers, 2018.

27. Berenschot, Joost Krebbekx and Gijs Duivenvoorde – and Innovation, Siem Haffmans – Partners for. Roadmap towards increasing the sustainability of plastics packaging. NRK Verpakkingen, 2018. p. 74.

28. European Food Safety Authority. Plastics and Plastics Recycling. [Online] [Cited: Aug. 24, 2019.] https://www.efsa.europa.eu/en/topics/topic/plastics-and-plastic-recycling.

29. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Recycled Plastics in Food Packaging. [Online] Mar. 21, 2018. [Cited: Aug. 24, 2019.] https://www.fda.gov/food/packaging-food-contact-substances-fcs/recycled-plastics-food-packaging.

30. OECD. Improving Markets for Recycled Plastics: Trends, Prospects and Policy Responses,. Paris : OECD, 2018.

31. Project, The Climate Reality, [prod.]. Ethane Cracker Plants What Are They. Washington D.C.: The Climate Reality Project, Oct. 23, 2018.

32. Senators Allen, Skinner, Stern and Wiener. SB-54 California Circular Economy and Plastics Pollution Reduction Act. [leginfo.legislature.ca.gov]. Sacramento, California, USA : California State Legislature, Aug. 14, 2019.

33. Reusables Organization About Page. Usereusables Organization. [Online] [Cited: Aug. 18, 2019.] http://usereusables.org/about-reusables.

34. Dutch Ministry of Infrastructure and the Environment and the Ministry of Economic Affairs. The Circular Economy. Den Haag: September 2016.

35. TNO. Holland Circular Hotspot Home Page. Holland Circular Hotspot. [Online] 2019. [Cited: Aug. 21, 2019.] https://hollandcircularhotspot.nl/en/.

36. Dutch Packaging Waste Fund Home Page. Afvalfondsverpakkingen.nl. [Online] 2019. https://afvalfondsverpakkingen.nl/en/packaging-waste-fund.

37. Policy Afvalfonds Verpakkingen (Packaging Waste Fund). Afvalfondsverpakkingen.nl. [Online] Dec. 20, 2018. [Cited: Aug. 21, 2019.] https://afvalfondsverpakkingen.nl/a/i/Beleid-Overeenkomsten/Policy-2019.pdf.

38. KIDV. Organizational Structure. KIDV Netherlands Institute for Sustainable Packaging. [Online] [Cited: Aug. 21, 2019.] https://www.kidv.nl/228/over-het-kidv.html?ch=EN#organizational-structure.

39. Netherlands Institute for Sustainable Packaging (KIDV). Brand owners combine forces to address challenges to make flexible packaging circular. Jul. 16, 2019. Press Release.

40. Centraal Bureau Levensmiddelenhandel (CBL). 20% minder verpakkingen in de supermarkt in 2025. CBL Laaste Nieuws . [Online] Feb. 15, 2019. [Cited: Aug. 25, 2019.] https://www.cbl.nl/consumenten-hebben-weer-vertrouwen-in-de-supermarkt-2/.

41. MOV Nederland. Future Proof Community. Future Proof Community. [Online] Aug. 24, 2019. [Cited: Aug. 24, 2019.] https://futureproof.community/.

____________________________________________________________________________________________

Fist-bumpFind your success! Subscribe to free Packaging Digest enewsletters.

 

Local save:https://www.convertingguide.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/westpack.packagingdigest.comhome-is-859050944-a76c1d78826af1cd8caf18510790d1c7e99d618c-5.jpg

Image process :: Saving local image

grab remote location : https://www.convertingguide.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/westpack.packagingdigest.comhome-is-859050944-a76c1d78826af1cd8caf18510790d1c7e99d618c-5.jpg

Image exists, checking for same file size

Replacing images : WestPack-2020 - WestPack-2020 ON

New research will analyze challenges and comparisons of companies in the Netherlands versus California, two hotbeds of environmental interest and responsibility.

 

People working in jobs related to producing, packaging, distributing and selling food products face increased sustainability demands. Such demands evolved over the past 50 years, starting in the 1970s (1). Current interest in sustainability remains high amongst packaging professionals as such articles are commonly read the most often in industry trade journals such as Packaging Digest (2).

Between North America and Europe today, there are 47 standards related to the sustainability of processed foods (3). While sustainable food production and packaging are similar to the notions of circular food production and circular packaging, they are not the same. Many publications over the past few years have compared the two types of practices, with a good summary given by Korhonen (4). It’s unfortunate that in the past century we have foregone our previous sustainable and sometime circular lifestyles that were common for hundreds of years in the past (5).

Sustainable packaging design focuses on developing eco-friendly designs and production strategies. Such practices tend to be linear and do not address imbalances between input and output streams, nor address the quality of recycling well.

Many sustainable packaging programs focus on material reduction, which sometimes results in complex materials such as (plastic) laminates. Such inseparable material combinations hinder the development of products and packaging for circular systems (6).

In countries in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), plastic package recycling rates vary between 10% for the USA to 50% for the Netherlands. The net result of this deficiency is a growing waste problem as shown in Figure 1.

A new motivation for circular plastics packaging stems from China and other Asian countries deciding to stop accepting and “processing” plastic waste from around the world. In fact, these policy changes from Asia have had a negative effect on plastics collections and recycling in many European and North American communities (7) (8).

How can mid-sized food suppliers deliver circular packaging solutions?

Figure 1: Cumulative plastic waste generation and disposal (in millions of metric tons). Solid line shown historical data from 1950 to 2015; dashed lines show projections of historical trends to 2050. (Reprinted from Science Advances 19 Jul 2017: Vol. 3, no. 7, e1700782 DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.1700782.  Copyright The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Assn. for the Advancement of Science. Distributed under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License 4.0 (CC BY-NC) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/).

 

Currently, literature focuses on the theoretical implications of transition to circular systems, while practical examples of packaging concepts suited for circular systems are scarce (6). For example, reusable packaging is a circular concept that is still rarely implemented by food producing companies and value chains. But TerraCycle is carrying out some ambitious trials currently with some multi-national brand owners (9) (10).

This is not to say that leading circular design practices are not being taught at the universities that we are involved with—such as California Polytechnic University San Luis Obisbo, and the Dutch Technical Universities of Twente and Delft.

Further, most research and pilot projects about circular packaging solutions focus on the world’s largest food brand owners, with small- and medium-sized enterprises under-researched (6) (11). These larger companies control about 80% of the processed foods that appear on the shelves of typical grocery stores in North America and Europe (12).

____________________________________________________________________________________________

WestPack-2020  WestPack 2020: Ideas. Education. New Partners. Feb. 11-13

____________________________________________________________________________________________

Recently, there has been some motivational economic case studies about larger volume business-to-business (B2B) circular packaging solutions by the Reusable Packaging Assn. (13) and the Reusable Industrial Packaging Assn. (14). Thus, we are focusing our research on mid-sized companies in the food production chain, about which little work has been done.

We will focus our research geographically to California and the Netherlands. You may ask why.

First, California and the Netherlands both actively strive to enact and implement leading environmentally friendly policies and practices related to food production and packaging (see “History and current initiatives”below). The ambitions are leading compared to peers.

Second, both of these areas are world agriculture and food production powerhouses, with California the leading state in the USA, and the Netherlands the leading agriculture exporter in the European Union (15) (16). Thus, these two areas provide a rich ecosystem for our research efforts.

Both the Netherlands and California promote, or are starting to mandate, sustainable and circular packaging solutions for all industries including food.

Thus, by carrying out parallel studies in both areas, we can learn from each other when it comes to which factors are most and least important for realizing successful circular packaging solutions. Successful circular food packaging solutions require alignment and cooperation of numerous stakeholders, as discussed below. Solutions cannot be designed, implemented and rolled out in a vacuum.

 

Three drivers of circular food packaging

From our perspective, in Figure 2, we identify three issues that need further research to put out pilot projects related to circular food packaging in both countries.

The past few years, several organizations either surveyed or wrote about consumers’ behavior related to “sustainable” products or reusable packaging of branded products (including food) (17) (18). However, these surveys are not specific enough when it comes to identifying actual consumer behavior and needs of reusable food packaging solutions on a daily or weekly basis.

Further, retail grocery stores and foodservice providers will not facilitate most circular food packaging initiatives unless there is evidence of strong consumer buy-in over longer periods of time.

Figure 2: Drivers of Circular Food Packaging

 

Even if consumers are willing to change their behavior relative to circular-friendly packaging, economically it needs to make sense for all parties involved in the supply chain. Economic gain is difficult to substantiate and is a topic widely research and written about. Understanding the value propositions of certain kinds of circular practices can be difficult for traditional investors and banks (19).

In the Netherlands, the three biggest banks launched guidelines in 2018 for creating a common framework for financing circular economy initiatives by industry (20). Thus, there is some movement by the financial community to address the economic viability of new initiatives. However, most likely most actual projects will have to be financed by individual companies in the value chains, with perhaps consumers having to pay more for their packaged food product(s) as well.

Lastly, we need to consider the closed-loop environment impact of any new circular packaging solutions. The solution may be wanted and acceptable to consumers, and it may be profitable for the delivery value chain, but the environmental impact also needs careful consideration.

The problem with life-cycle assessment (LCA) for our research is the lack of agreement on the proper frameworks to use in carrying out the analysis (21). There are numerous frameworks and tools like COMPASS for carrying out LCA. Any LCA needs to also consider food waste, and how the results can be communicated to consumers and members of the value chain to convince them to cooperate in new initiatives.

 

Current research focus and ambitions

Our research in the Netherlands and California will focus on the following four research topic in the next two years:

1. Consumers:

• Characterize consumer behavior/needs toward specific circular packaged food products in the Netherlands and California.

• Understand consumer attitudes towards reuse, co-use or refill offerings of specific foods.

 

2. Mid-sized Food Producers:

• Identify appropriate mid-sized food suppliers and their value chains that are ripe for moving forward with circular food packaging initiatives.

• Inventory the needs of mid-sized food producers with regard to circular economy ambitions.

• Determine operational needs and technical requirements from the food producer to consumer.

 

3. Retail Grocery / Foodservice Value Chains:

• Characterize economic needs and costs from the retail perspective.

• Inventory needs of downstream members of value chain concerning distribution and reverse logistics issues related to reuse, refill, co-use, re-appropriate or recycling.

 

4. LCA, Economics and Pilot Project(s):

• Propose a circular model for one or more food products in California and the Netherlands (including economics, costs, investments needed, life cycle assessment).

• Establish a consortium of companies in the Netherlands and California willing to carry out a pilot project for the circular model proposed.

• Measure consumer behavior to the new circularly packaged food compared to non-circularly packaged food.

• Characterize and pursue additional sources of funding for implementing the pilot project for the consortium of companies.

• Learn from comparisons and contrasts between the Netherlands and California.

We intend to publish the results of research topics one to three in the first half of 2020 in  Packaging Digest. Depending upon consumer cooperation, we intend to further publish the results of our field trials at the end of 2020.  

At this time, we are looking for mid-sized (fresh) food producers, retail grocery chains, logistics service providers, and packaging companies in California and Northwest Europe to join our research and pilot project efforts in 2020. Interested companies in these areas can contact us via this form

____________________________________________________________________________________________

WestPack-2020  WestPack 2020: Ideas. Education. New Partners. Feb. 11-13

____________________________________________________________________________________________

History and current initiatives

In past centuries, most products were recycled or reused, as there was perpetual scarcity of food and packaging materials (5). Thus, recycling focused beyond metal, paperboard and glass, to include porcelain/clay jars, cotton bags and wooden boxes amongst other packaging materials.

Over the past 100 years, in most countries of the world, food scarcity subsided, and efficient industrial production created mass-produced raw materials and packages for food production and distribution. During the 20th century, plastic packaging was also introduced into the food supply chain. The net result of this has been less food waste, more consumer choice and convenience, longer supply chains, and much lower prices for food.

As packaging pollution increases worldwide, numerous government and non-profit organizations are implementing laws and initiatives to turn the tide against simple linear production of food. Recent Extended Product Responsibility (ERP) policies extend a manufacturer’s responsibility for reducing packaging impacts downstream, when consumers are done with them (22) (23). Over the past 30 years, more than 300 ERP laws have been passed and implemented in both the European Union and in the USA, with a good overview provided by CalRecycle (24) and OECD (25). Of these laws, only 17% of them are related to actual packaging.

The OECD reports that in the European Union recycling rates of packaging vary between 29% and 84% in 2014, with a target of 55% for all plastic waste by 2025. In 2016, in the European Union, recycling of plastic packaging reached a level of 40.8% and, for the first time, recycling rates exceeded energy recovery and landfill rates (26). Collection of plastic packaging in the Netherlands is higher, close to 50% in 2019 (27), but unfortunately only 35% of the collected waste ends up being recycled into new plastic, resulting in a yield of only 17%.

There are several reasons for such a low yield, which are beyond the scope of this article. But some of the main limitations behind using recycled plastics for food are:

• Food safety requirements for recycled plastics used for food (28) (29).

• Competition in undifferentiated markets for recycled plastic versus virgin plastics (30).

• Many new virgin plastics production plants coming online driven by cheap natural gas prices, resulting in cheap virgin materials (31).

Now let’s look at specific initiative and activities in California and the Netherlands.

Recently, in California, a new Senate Bill (SB-54) called California Circular Economy and Plastic Pollution Reduction Act is going through committee processes (32). The goal of this law is to achieve 75% recycling rates by 2030, and to reduce single-use packaging by 75%. Currently, in California less than 9% of plastic is recycled.

Historically, California has depended on exporting plastics and paper packaging streams to China and other countries—which is no longer possible. It’s noteworthy that about 75 organizations in and outside the state support the new bill, while seven major organizations—including the Grocery Manufacturers Assn., Plastics Industry Assn. and Household and Commercial Products Assn.—oppose the new bill.

A longer campaign has existed to educate California consumers and small- and medium-sized businesses about reusables for food products and food production. The Use Reusables campaign is a joint project of Alameda County (CA) public agency  and the Reusable Packaging Assn. (RPA). Launched in 2007, the campaign’s goal is to help businesses and institutions assess and optimize the transport packaging materials and systems they use, either within their manufacturing process or for product distribution (33). Thus far, the focus has been on totes, crates, intermediate bulk containers and reusable strapping to secure bundled bulk pallets of products in business-to-business (B2B) closed-loop deliveries.

In the Netherlands, the government launched the program A Circular Economy in the Netherlands by 2050 in September 2016. In this program, a nationwide plan is drawn up by multiple ministries to function as a vision for the successful implementation of the circular economy. The goal formulated in this report is to reduce the amount of primary resources used in the Netherlands by 50% in 2030, and to become completely circular by 2050 (34). In addition, the government facilitated the creation and support of the website Holland Circular Hotspot. It is a private public platform in which companies, knowledge institutes and (local) authorities collaborate internationally to exchange knowledge and stimulate entrepreneurship in the field of circular economy (35).

In 2014, as part of the Dutch government’s efforts to ramp up extended producer responsibility of packaging, the “Packaging Waste Fund” was established by producers and importers. This fund’s purpose is to collectively meet the extended producer responsibilities as stated in the national Packaging Decree and Packaging Agreement between industry and the government. It is a not-for-profit organization governed by a board of directors, who are themselves appointed by producers and importers (36).

Thus, as of 2018, all producers and importers of end-user consumer packaged products must pay levies into the waste fund, which vary between 2 and 78 euro-cents per kilogram (Note: B2B logistics packaging is not included) (37). Manufacturers packaging consumer products can qualify for lower levies if they agree to use a certain percentage of recycled content in their packages. Thus, economic incentives are being created to use recycled streams of materials. This organization reports that, in 2017, the Dutch recycled 87% of paper and paperboard, 86% glass, 95% metal, 73% wood and 50% plastic.

The Packaging Waste Fund resulted in the creation of the Netherlands Institute for Sustainable Packaging (KIDV), which is funded for 10 years at 2M euros per year by the fund. The KIDV employs a staff of 16 and acts as a national clearing house for developing, sharing and bringing knowledge together in the form of events, collaborative research, tools and expert advice (38). The KIDV is similar to the non-profit member-supported American Sustainable Packaging Coalition, which has been active since 2004.

A lot of the KIDV’s current activities focus on plastics, as the Netherlands already recycles a majority of non-plastics. For example, last July, they initiated a Community of Practice (CoP) with a consortium of companies facing similar challenges related to developing metallized flexible packaging that is suitable for the circular economy (39). The government decided that one of the five focus areas of its circular economy initiatives should focus on plastics.

In private industry, in February 2019, Dutch Grocery Store Organization made up of 24 corporate members agreed to reducing all packaging in their retail stores by 20% by 2025 (40). Initial efforts will focus on fruits and vegetables and on increasing recycled content of packaging. Another organization, MVO (Dutch Foundation for Socially Responsible Entrepreneurship) is also working on facilitating circular economy projects and matchmaking between companies. Their Future Proof Community website has more than 3,500 companies and acts as a matchmaker for companies that put out sustainable or circular challenges and companies suggesting solutions (41).

    

 

REFERENCES

1. Kidd, Charles V. The evolution of sustainability. J Agric Environ Ethics, Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1992. Vol. 1.

2. Lingle, Rick. Packaging Digest, Jul. 15, 2019. Sustainability drives the top five in food and beverage packaging.

3. International Trade Centre. Sustainability Map. All processed foods in Europe and North America.

4. Jouni Korhonena, Cali Nuurb, Andreas Feldmann, Seyoum Eshetu Birkiea. Circular economy as an essentially contested concept. Journal of Cleaner Production, Elsivier, Feb. 25, 2018. Vol. 175.

5. Trentmann, Frank. Empire of Things. Penquin Random House UK Books, 2016, pp. 624-654.

6. Bjorn de Koeijer, Renee Wever, Jorg Henseler. Realizing Product-Packaging Combinations in Circular Systems: Shaping the Research Agenda. 2017, Vol. 30.

7. Katz, Cheryl. Piling Up: How China’s Ban on Importing Waste Has Stalled Global Recycling. Yale University, Yale School of Forrestry & Environmental Studies, Mar. 7, 2019.

8. Erin McCormick, Charlotte Simmonds, Jessica Glenza, Katharine Gammon. Americans’ plastic recycling is dumped in landfills, investigation shows. The Guardian. Jun. 21, 2019.

9. Makower, Joel. Loop’s launch brings reusable packaging to the world’s biggest brands. GreenBiz Group, Jan. 24, 2019.

10. Devenyns, Jessi. Why reuseable food packaging has a promising future. FoodDive, Jun. 25, 2019.

11. Szaky, Tom. The Future of Packaging. Oakland: Berrett-Koehler Publishsers Inc., 2019.

12. Kramer, Anna. These 10 companies make a lot of the food we buy. Here’s how we made them better. Oxfam. [Online] Dec. 10, 2014. [Cited: Jul. 25, 2019.] https://www.oxfamamerica.org/explore/stories/these-10-companies-make-a-lot-of-the-food-we-buy-heres-how-we-made-them-better/.

13. Reusable Packaging Assn. A cost comparison model for reusable transport packaging. 102, June 2016.

14. Studies and Report. Reusable Industrial Packaging Assn. [Online] Aug. 18, 2019. [Cited: Aug. 18, 2019.] https://www.reusablepackaging.org/studies-and-reports/.

15. National Geographic. Tiny Country Feeds the World. September 2017.

16. California Department of Food and Agriculture. California Agricultural Production Statistics. 2017.

17. Wharton University of Pennsylvania. Reusable Packaging from Big Brands: Will Consumers Buy In? Wharton Business School, Knowledge@Wharton, Feb. 12, 2019.

18. Nielson. Consumer-Goods’ Brands That Demonstrate Commitment To Sustainability Outperform Those That Don’t. [Webpage]. Oct. 12, 2015.

19. Judith Kas, Bram Bet & Daphne Truijens. Barriers and Best Practices for the Circular Economy. SMO Promovendi. Circular Minds 2017-2018.

20. Rabobank Nederland. ABN AMRO, ING and Rabobank launch finance guidelines for circular economy. Rabobank Nederland Press Releases. [Online] Jul. 9, 2018. [Cited: Aug. 25, 2019.] https://www.rabobank.com/en/press/search/2018/20180702-abn-amro-ing-and-rabobank-launch-finance-guidelines-for-circular-economy.html.

21. Erik Pauer*, Bernhard Wohner, Victoria Heinrich and Manfred Tacker.Assessing the Environmental Sustainability of Food Packaging: An Extended Life Cycle Assessment including Packaging-Related Food Losses and Waste and Circularity Assessment. Basel: MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland, 11 2019, Sustainability, p. 925. Section of Packaging Technology and Resource Management, University of Applied Science, 1030 Vienna.

22. European Union. Closing the loop: Commission adopts ambitious new Circular Economy Package to boost competitiveness, create jobs and generate sustainable growth. Brussels: European Union, Dec. 2, 2015.

23. California Product Stewardship Counsel. California ERP Legislation. https://www.calpsc.org/.[Online] Aug. 13, 2019. [Cited: Aug. 13, 2019.] https://www.calpsc.org/legislation.

24. CalRecycle California Goverment. California Recylce Policy and Law. [Online] Jul. 19, 2019. [Cited: Aug. 13, 2019.] https://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/epr/policylaw.

25. OECD. OECD (2016), Extended Producer Responsibility: Updated Guidance for Efficient Waste Management, OECD Publishing, Paris. [Online] Sept. 16, 2016. [Cited: Aug. 13, 2019.] https://www.oecd-ilibrary.org/sites/9789264256385-4-en/index.html?itemId=/content/component/9789264256385-4-en.

26. PlasticsEurope Assn. of Plastics Manufacturers. Plastics the Facts 2017. European Assn. of Plastics Manufacturers, 2018.

27. Berenschot, Joost Krebbekx and Gijs Duivenvoorde – and Innovation, Siem Haffmans – Partners for. Roadmap towards increasing the sustainability of plastics packaging. NRK Verpakkingen, 2018. p. 74.

28. European Food Safety Authority. Plastics and Plastics Recycling. [Online] [Cited: Aug. 24, 2019.] https://www.efsa.europa.eu/en/topics/topic/plastics-and-plastic-recycling.

29. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Recycled Plastics in Food Packaging. [Online] Mar. 21, 2018. [Cited: Aug. 24, 2019.] https://www.fda.gov/food/packaging-food-contact-substances-fcs/recycled-plastics-food-packaging.

30. OECD. Improving Markets for Recycled Plastics: Trends, Prospects and Policy Responses,. Paris : OECD, 2018.

31. Project, The Climate Reality, [prod.]. Ethane Cracker Plants What Are They. Washington D.C.: The Climate Reality Project, Oct. 23, 2018.

32. Senators Allen, Skinner, Stern and Wiener. SB-54 California Circular Economy and Plastics Pollution Reduction Act. [leginfo.legislature.ca.gov]. Sacramento, California, USA : California State Legislature, Aug. 14, 2019.

33. Reusables Organization About Page. Usereusables Organization. [Online] [Cited: Aug. 18, 2019.] http://usereusables.org/about-reusables.

34. Dutch Ministry of Infrastructure and the Environment and the Ministry of Economic Affairs. The Circular Economy. Den Haag: September 2016.

35. TNO. Holland Circular Hotspot Home Page. Holland Circular Hotspot. [Online] 2019. [Cited: Aug. 21, 2019.] https://hollandcircularhotspot.nl/en/.

36. Dutch Packaging Waste Fund Home Page. Afvalfondsverpakkingen.nl. [Online] 2019. https://afvalfondsverpakkingen.nl/en/packaging-waste-fund.

37. Policy Afvalfonds Verpakkingen (Packaging Waste Fund). Afvalfondsverpakkingen.nl. [Online] Dec. 20, 2018. [Cited: Aug. 21, 2019.] https://afvalfondsverpakkingen.nl/a/i/Beleid-Overeenkomsten/Policy-2019.pdf.

38. KIDV. Organizational Structure. KIDV Netherlands Institute for Sustainable Packaging. [Online] [Cited: Aug. 21, 2019.] https://www.kidv.nl/228/over-het-kidv.html?ch=EN#organizational-structure.

39. Netherlands Institute for Sustainable Packaging (KIDV). Brand owners combine forces to address challenges to make flexible packaging circular. Jul. 16, 2019. Press Release.

40. Centraal Bureau Levensmiddelenhandel (CBL). 20% minder verpakkingen in de supermarkt in 2025. CBL Laaste Nieuws . [Online] Feb. 15, 2019. [Cited: Aug. 25, 2019.] https://www.cbl.nl/consumenten-hebben-weer-vertrouwen-in-de-supermarkt-2/.

41. MOV Nederland. Future Proof Community. Future Proof Community. [Online] Aug. 24, 2019. [Cited: Aug. 24, 2019.] https://futureproof.community/.

____________________________________________________________________________________________

Fist-bumpFind your success! Subscribe to free Packaging Digest enewsletters.

 

Local save:https://www.convertingguide.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/www.packagingdigest.comSzanto-Fig-2-72dpi-e143502cb3211a7c1015e7dbff4ab616ee121106.jpg

Image process :: Saving local image

grab remote location : https://www.convertingguide.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/www.packagingdigest.comSzanto-Fig-2-72dpi-e143502cb3211a7c1015e7dbff4ab616ee121106.jpg

Image exists, checking for same file size

Replacing images : - ON

New research will analyze challenges and comparisons of companies in the Netherlands versus California, two hotbeds of environmental interest and responsibility.

 

People working in jobs related to producing, packaging, distributing and selling food products face increased sustainability demands. Such demands evolved over the past 50 years, starting in the 1970s (1). Current interest in sustainability remains high amongst packaging professionals as such articles are commonly read the most often in industry trade journals such as Packaging Digest (2).

Between North America and Europe today, there are 47 standards related to the sustainability of processed foods (3). While sustainable food production and packaging are similar to the notions of circular food production and circular packaging, they are not the same. Many publications over the past few years have compared the two types of practices, with a good summary given by Korhonen (4). It’s unfortunate that in the past century we have foregone our previous sustainable and sometime circular lifestyles that were common for hundreds of years in the past (5).

Sustainable packaging design focuses on developing eco-friendly designs and production strategies. Such practices tend to be linear and do not address imbalances between input and output streams, nor address the quality of recycling well.

Many sustainable packaging programs focus on material reduction, which sometimes results in complex materials such as (plastic) laminates. Such inseparable material combinations hinder the development of products and packaging for circular systems (6).

In countries in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), plastic package recycling rates vary between 10% for the USA to 50% for the Netherlands. The net result of this deficiency is a growing waste problem as shown in Figure 1.

A new motivation for circular plastics packaging stems from China and other Asian countries deciding to stop accepting and “processing” plastic waste from around the world. In fact, these policy changes from Asia have had a negative effect on plastics collections and recycling in many European and North American communities (7) (8).

How can mid-sized food suppliers deliver circular packaging solutions?

Figure 1: Cumulative plastic waste generation and disposal (in millions of metric tons). Solid line shown historical data from 1950 to 2015; dashed lines show projections of historical trends to 2050. (Reprinted from Science Advances 19 Jul 2017: Vol. 3, no. 7, e1700782 DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.1700782.  Copyright The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Assn. for the Advancement of Science. Distributed under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License 4.0 (CC BY-NC) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/).

 

Currently, literature focuses on the theoretical implications of transition to circular systems, while practical examples of packaging concepts suited for circular systems are scarce (6). For example, reusable packaging is a circular concept that is still rarely implemented by food producing companies and value chains. But TerraCycle is carrying out some ambitious trials currently with some multi-national brand owners (9) (10).

This is not to say that leading circular design practices are not being taught at the universities that we are involved with—such as California Polytechnic University San Luis Obisbo, and the Dutch Technical Universities of Twente and Delft.

Further, most research and pilot projects about circular packaging solutions focus on the world’s largest food brand owners, with small- and medium-sized enterprises under-researched (6) (11). These larger companies control about 80% of the processed foods that appear on the shelves of typical grocery stores in North America and Europe (12).

____________________________________________________________________________________________

How can mid-sized food suppliers deliver circular packaging solutions?  WestPack 2020: Ideas. Education. New Partners. Feb. 11-13

____________________________________________________________________________________________

Recently, there has been some motivational economic case studies about larger volume business-to-business (B2B) circular packaging solutions by the Reusable Packaging Assn. (13) and the Reusable Industrial Packaging Assn. (14). Thus, we are focusing our research on mid-sized companies in the food production chain, about which little work has been done.

We will focus our research geographically to California and the Netherlands. You may ask why.

First, California and the Netherlands both actively strive to enact and implement leading environmentally friendly policies and practices related to food production and packaging (see “History and current initiatives”below). The ambitions are leading compared to peers.

Second, both of these areas are world agriculture and food production powerhouses, with California the leading state in the USA, and the Netherlands the leading agriculture exporter in the European Union (15) (16). Thus, these two areas provide a rich ecosystem for our research efforts.

Both the Netherlands and California promote, or are starting to mandate, sustainable and circular packaging solutions for all industries including food.

Thus, by carrying out parallel studies in both areas, we can learn from each other when it comes to which factors are most and least important for realizing successful circular packaging solutions. Successful circular food packaging solutions require alignment and cooperation of numerous stakeholders, as discussed below. Solutions cannot be designed, implemented and rolled out in a vacuum.

 

Three drivers of circular food packaging

From our perspective, in Figure 2, we identify three issues that need further research to put out pilot projects related to circular food packaging in both countries.

The past few years, several organizations either surveyed or wrote about consumers’ behavior related to “sustainable” products or reusable packaging of branded products (including food) (17) (18). However, these surveys are not specific enough when it comes to identifying actual consumer behavior and needs of reusable food packaging solutions on a daily or weekly basis.

Further, retail grocery stores and foodservice providers will not facilitate most circular food packaging initiatives unless there is evidence of strong consumer buy-in over longer periods of time.

Figure 2: Drivers of Circular Food Packaging

 

Even if consumers are willing to change their behavior relative to circular-friendly packaging, economically it needs to make sense for all parties involved in the supply chain. Economic gain is difficult to substantiate and is a topic widely research and written about. Understanding the value propositions of certain kinds of circular practices can be difficult for traditional investors and banks (19).

In the Netherlands, the three biggest banks launched guidelines in 2018 for creating a common framework for financing circular economy initiatives by industry (20). Thus, there is some movement by the financial community to address the economic viability of new initiatives. However, most likely most actual projects will have to be financed by individual companies in the value chains, with perhaps consumers having to pay more for their packaged food product(s) as well.

Lastly, we need to consider the closed-loop environment impact of any new circular packaging solutions. The solution may be wanted and acceptable to consumers, and it may be profitable for the delivery value chain, but the environmental impact also needs careful consideration.

The problem with life-cycle assessment (LCA) for our research is the lack of agreement on the proper frameworks to use in carrying out the analysis (21). There are numerous frameworks and tools like COMPASS for carrying out LCA. Any LCA needs to also consider food waste, and how the results can be communicated to consumers and members of the value chain to convince them to cooperate in new initiatives.

 

Current research focus and ambitions

Our research in the Netherlands and California will focus on the following four research topic in the next two years:

1. Consumers:

• Characterize consumer behavior/needs toward specific circular packaged food products in the Netherlands and California.

• Understand consumer attitudes towards reuse, co-use or refill offerings of specific foods.

 

2. Mid-sized Food Producers:

• Identify appropriate mid-sized food suppliers and their value chains that are ripe for moving forward with circular food packaging initiatives.

• Inventory the needs of mid-sized food producers with regard to circular economy ambitions.

• Determine operational needs and technical requirements from the food producer to consumer.

 

3. Retail Grocery / Foodservice Value Chains:

• Characterize economic needs and costs from the retail perspective.

• Inventory needs of downstream members of value chain concerning distribution and reverse logistics issues related to reuse, refill, co-use, re-appropriate or recycling.

 

4. LCA, Economics and Pilot Project(s):

• Propose a circular model for one or more food products in California and the Netherlands (including economics, costs, investments needed, life cycle assessment).

• Establish a consortium of companies in the Netherlands and California willing to carry out a pilot project for the circular model proposed.

• Measure consumer behavior to the new circularly packaged food compared to non-circularly packaged food.

• Characterize and pursue additional sources of funding for implementing the pilot project for the consortium of companies.

• Learn from comparisons and contrasts between the Netherlands and California.

We intend to publish the results of research topics one to three in the first half of 2020 in  Packaging Digest. Depending upon consumer cooperation, we intend to further publish the results of our field trials at the end of 2020.  

At this time, we are looking for mid-sized (fresh) food producers, retail grocery chains, logistics service providers, and packaging companies in California and Northwest Europe to join our research and pilot project efforts in 2020. Interested companies in these areas can contact us via this form

____________________________________________________________________________________________

How can mid-sized food suppliers deliver circular packaging solutions?  WestPack 2020: Ideas. Education. New Partners. Feb. 11-13

____________________________________________________________________________________________

History and current initiatives

In past centuries, most products were recycled or reused, as there was perpetual scarcity of food and packaging materials (5). Thus, recycling focused beyond metal, paperboard and glass, to include porcelain/clay jars, cotton bags and wooden boxes amongst other packaging materials.

Over the past 100 years, in most countries of the world, food scarcity subsided, and efficient industrial production created mass-produced raw materials and packages for food production and distribution. During the 20th century, plastic packaging was also introduced into the food supply chain. The net result of this has been less food waste, more consumer choice and convenience, longer supply chains, and much lower prices for food.

As packaging pollution increases worldwide, numerous government and non-profit organizations are implementing laws and initiatives to turn the tide against simple linear production of food. Recent Extended Product Responsibility (ERP) policies extend a manufacturer’s responsibility for reducing packaging impacts downstream, when consumers are done with them (22) (23). Over the past 30 years, more than 300 ERP laws have been passed and implemented in both the European Union and in the USA, with a good overview provided by CalRecycle (24) and OECD (25). Of these laws, only 17% of them are related to actual packaging.

The OECD reports that in the European Union recycling rates of packaging vary between 29% and 84% in 2014, with a target of 55% for all plastic waste by 2025. In 2016, in the European Union, recycling of plastic packaging reached a level of 40.8% and, for the first time, recycling rates exceeded energy recovery and landfill rates (26). Collection of plastic packaging in the Netherlands is higher, close to 50% in 2019 (27), but unfortunately only 35% of the collected waste ends up being recycled into new plastic, resulting in a yield of only 17%.

There are several reasons for such a low yield, which are beyond the scope of this article. But some of the main limitations behind using recycled plastics for food are:

• Food safety requirements for recycled plastics used for food (28) (29).

• Competition in undifferentiated markets for recycled plastic versus virgin plastics (30).

• Many new virgin plastics production plants coming online driven by cheap natural gas prices, resulting in cheap virgin materials (31).

Now let’s look at specific initiative and activities in California and the Netherlands.

Recently, in California, a new Senate Bill (SB-54) called California Circular Economy and Plastic Pollution Reduction Act is going through committee processes (32). The goal of this law is to achieve 75% recycling rates by 2030, and to reduce single-use packaging by 75%. Currently, in California less than 9% of plastic is recycled.

Historically, California has depended on exporting plastics and paper packaging streams to China and other countries—which is no longer possible. It’s noteworthy that about 75 organizations in and outside the state support the new bill, while seven major organizations—including the Grocery Manufacturers Assn., Plastics Industry Assn. and Household and Commercial Products Assn.—oppose the new bill.

A longer campaign has existed to educate California consumers and small- and medium-sized businesses about reusables for food products and food production. The Use Reusables campaign is a joint project of Alameda County (CA) public agency  and the Reusable Packaging Assn. (RPA). Launched in 2007, the campaign’s goal is to help businesses and institutions assess and optimize the transport packaging materials and systems they use, either within their manufacturing process or for product distribution (33). Thus far, the focus has been on totes, crates, intermediate bulk containers and reusable strapping to secure bundled bulk pallets of products in business-to-business (B2B) closed-loop deliveries.

In the Netherlands, the government launched the program A Circular Economy in the Netherlands by 2050 in September 2016. In this program, a nationwide plan is drawn up by multiple ministries to function as a vision for the successful implementation of the circular economy. The goal formulated in this report is to reduce the amount of primary resources used in the Netherlands by 50% in 2030, and to become completely circular by 2050 (34). In addition, the government facilitated the creation and support of the website Holland Circular Hotspot. It is a private public platform in which companies, knowledge institutes and (local) authorities collaborate internationally to exchange knowledge and stimulate entrepreneurship in the field of circular economy (35).

In 2014, as part of the Dutch government’s efforts to ramp up extended producer responsibility of packaging, the “Packaging Waste Fund” was established by producers and importers. This fund’s purpose is to collectively meet the extended producer responsibilities as stated in the national Packaging Decree and Packaging Agreement between industry and the government. It is a not-for-profit organization governed by a board of directors, who are themselves appointed by producers and importers (36).

Thus, as of 2018, all producers and importers of end-user consumer packaged products must pay levies into the waste fund, which vary between 2 and 78 euro-cents per kilogram (Note: B2B logistics packaging is not included) (37). Manufacturers packaging consumer products can qualify for lower levies if they agree to use a certain percentage of recycled content in their packages. Thus, economic incentives are being created to use recycled streams of materials. This organization reports that, in 2017, the Dutch recycled 87% of paper and paperboard, 86% glass, 95% metal, 73% wood and 50% plastic.

The Packaging Waste Fund resulted in the creation of the Netherlands Institute for Sustainable Packaging (KIDV), which is funded for 10 years at 2M euros per year by the fund. The KIDV employs a staff of 16 and acts as a national clearing house for developing, sharing and bringing knowledge together in the form of events, collaborative research, tools and expert advice (38). The KIDV is similar to the non-profit member-supported American Sustainable Packaging Coalition, which has been active since 2004.

A lot of the KIDV’s current activities focus on plastics, as the Netherlands already recycles a majority of non-plastics. For example, last July, they initiated a Community of Practice (CoP) with a consortium of companies facing similar challenges related to developing metallized flexible packaging that is suitable for the circular economy (39). The government decided that one of the five focus areas of its circular economy initiatives should focus on plastics.

In private industry, in February 2019, Dutch Grocery Store Organization made up of 24 corporate members agreed to reducing all packaging in their retail stores by 20% by 2025 (40). Initial efforts will focus on fruits and vegetables and on increasing recycled content of packaging. Another organization, MVO (Dutch Foundation for Socially Responsible Entrepreneurship) is also working on facilitating circular economy projects and matchmaking between companies. Their Future Proof Community website has more than 3,500 companies and acts as a matchmaker for companies that put out sustainable or circular challenges and companies suggesting solutions (41).

    

 

REFERENCES

1. Kidd, Charles V. The evolution of sustainability. J Agric Environ Ethics, Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1992. Vol. 1.

2. Lingle, Rick. Packaging Digest, Jul. 15, 2019. Sustainability drives the top five in food and beverage packaging.

3. International Trade Centre. Sustainability Map. All processed foods in Europe and North America.

4. Jouni Korhonena, Cali Nuurb, Andreas Feldmann, Seyoum Eshetu Birkiea. Circular economy as an essentially contested concept. Journal of Cleaner Production, Elsivier, Feb. 25, 2018. Vol. 175.

5. Trentmann, Frank. Empire of Things. Penquin Random House UK Books, 2016, pp. 624-654.

6. Bjorn de Koeijer, Renee Wever, Jorg Henseler. Realizing Product-Packaging Combinations in Circular Systems: Shaping the Research Agenda. 2017, Vol. 30.

7. Katz, Cheryl. Piling Up: How China’s Ban on Importing Waste Has Stalled Global Recycling. Yale University, Yale School of Forrestry & Environmental Studies, Mar. 7, 2019.

8. Erin McCormick, Charlotte Simmonds, Jessica Glenza, Katharine Gammon. Americans’ plastic recycling is dumped in landfills, investigation shows. The Guardian. Jun. 21, 2019.

9. Makower, Joel. Loop’s launch brings reusable packaging to the world’s biggest brands. GreenBiz Group, Jan. 24, 2019.

10. Devenyns, Jessi. Why reuseable food packaging has a promising future. FoodDive, Jun. 25, 2019.

11. Szaky, Tom. The Future of Packaging. Oakland: Berrett-Koehler Publishsers Inc., 2019.

12. Kramer, Anna. These 10 companies make a lot of the food we buy. Here’s how we made them better. Oxfam. [Online] Dec. 10, 2014. [Cited: Jul. 25, 2019.] https://www.oxfamamerica.org/explore/stories/these-10-companies-make-a-lot-of-the-food-we-buy-heres-how-we-made-them-better/.

13. Reusable Packaging Assn. A cost comparison model for reusable transport packaging. 102, June 2016.

14. Studies and Report. Reusable Industrial Packaging Assn. [Online] Aug. 18, 2019. [Cited: Aug. 18, 2019.] https://www.reusablepackaging.org/studies-and-reports/.

15. National Geographic. Tiny Country Feeds the World. September 2017.

16. California Department of Food and Agriculture. California Agricultural Production Statistics. 2017.

17. Wharton University of Pennsylvania. Reusable Packaging from Big Brands: Will Consumers Buy In? Wharton Business School, Knowledge@Wharton, Feb. 12, 2019.

18. Nielson. Consumer-Goods’ Brands That Demonstrate Commitment To Sustainability Outperform Those That Don’t. [Webpage]. Oct. 12, 2015.

19. Judith Kas, Bram Bet & Daphne Truijens. Barriers and Best Practices for the Circular Economy. SMO Promovendi. Circular Minds 2017-2018.

20. Rabobank Nederland. ABN AMRO, ING and Rabobank launch finance guidelines for circular economy. Rabobank Nederland Press Releases. [Online] Jul. 9, 2018. [Cited: Aug. 25, 2019.] https://www.rabobank.com/en/press/search/2018/20180702-abn-amro-ing-and-rabobank-launch-finance-guidelines-for-circular-economy.html.

21. Erik Pauer*, Bernhard Wohner, Victoria Heinrich and Manfred Tacker.Assessing the Environmental Sustainability of Food Packaging: An Extended Life Cycle Assessment including Packaging-Related Food Losses and Waste and Circularity Assessment. Basel: MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland, 11 2019, Sustainability, p. 925. Section of Packaging Technology and Resource Management, University of Applied Science, 1030 Vienna.

22. European Union. Closing the loop: Commission adopts ambitious new Circular Economy Package to boost competitiveness, create jobs and generate sustainable growth. Brussels: European Union, Dec. 2, 2015.

23. California Product Stewardship Counsel. California ERP Legislation. https://www.calpsc.org/.[Online] Aug. 13, 2019. [Cited: Aug. 13, 2019.] https://www.calpsc.org/legislation.

24. CalRecycle California Goverment. California Recylce Policy and Law. [Online] Jul. 19, 2019. [Cited: Aug. 13, 2019.] https://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/epr/policylaw.

25. OECD. OECD (2016), Extended Producer Responsibility: Updated Guidance for Efficient Waste Management, OECD Publishing, Paris. [Online] Sept. 16, 2016. [Cited: Aug. 13, 2019.] https://www.oecd-ilibrary.org/sites/9789264256385-4-en/index.html?itemId=/content/component/9789264256385-4-en.

26. PlasticsEurope Assn. of Plastics Manufacturers. Plastics the Facts 2017. European Assn. of Plastics Manufacturers, 2018.

27. Berenschot, Joost Krebbekx and Gijs Duivenvoorde – and Innovation, Siem Haffmans – Partners for. Roadmap towards increasing the sustainability of plastics packaging. NRK Verpakkingen, 2018. p. 74.

28. European Food Safety Authority. Plastics and Plastics Recycling. [Online] [Cited: Aug. 24, 2019.] https://www.efsa.europa.eu/en/topics/topic/plastics-and-plastic-recycling.

29. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Recycled Plastics in Food Packaging. [Online] Mar. 21, 2018. [Cited: Aug. 24, 2019.] https://www.fda.gov/food/packaging-food-contact-substances-fcs/recycled-plastics-food-packaging.

30. OECD. Improving Markets for Recycled Plastics: Trends, Prospects and Policy Responses,. Paris : OECD, 2018.

31. Project, The Climate Reality, [prod.]. Ethane Cracker Plants What Are They. Washington D.C.: The Climate Reality Project, Oct. 23, 2018.

32. Senators Allen, Skinner, Stern and Wiener. SB-54 California Circular Economy and Plastics Pollution Reduction Act. [leginfo.legislature.ca.gov]. Sacramento, California, USA : California State Legislature, Aug. 14, 2019.

33. Reusables Organization About Page. Usereusables Organization. [Online] [Cited: Aug. 18, 2019.] http://usereusables.org/about-reusables.

34. Dutch Ministry of Infrastructure and the Environment and the Ministry of Economic Affairs. The Circular Economy. Den Haag: September 2016.

35. TNO. Holland Circular Hotspot Home Page. Holland Circular Hotspot. [Online] 2019. [Cited: Aug. 21, 2019.] https://hollandcircularhotspot.nl/en/.

36. Dutch Packaging Waste Fund Home Page. Afvalfondsverpakkingen.nl. [Online] 2019. https://afvalfondsverpakkingen.nl/en/packaging-waste-fund.

37. Policy Afvalfonds Verpakkingen (Packaging Waste Fund). Afvalfondsverpakkingen.nl. [Online] Dec. 20, 2018. [Cited: Aug. 21, 2019.] https://afvalfondsverpakkingen.nl/a/i/Beleid-Overeenkomsten/Policy-2019.pdf.

38. KIDV. Organizational Structure. KIDV Netherlands Institute for Sustainable Packaging. [Online] [Cited: Aug. 21, 2019.] https://www.kidv.nl/228/over-het-kidv.html?ch=EN#organizational-structure.

39. Netherlands Institute for Sustainable Packaging (KIDV). Brand owners combine forces to address challenges to make flexible packaging circular. Jul. 16, 2019. Press Release.

40. Centraal Bureau Levensmiddelenhandel (CBL). 20% minder verpakkingen in de supermarkt in 2025. CBL Laaste Nieuws . [Online] Feb. 15, 2019. [Cited: Aug. 25, 2019.] https://www.cbl.nl/consumenten-hebben-weer-vertrouwen-in-de-supermarkt-2/.

41. MOV Nederland. Future Proof Community. Future Proof Community. [Online] Aug. 24, 2019. [Cited: Aug. 24, 2019.] https://futureproof.community/.

____________________________________________________________________________________________

Fist-bumpFind your success! Subscribe to free Packaging Digest enewsletters.

 

Local save:https://www.convertingguide.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/westpack.packagingdigest.comhome-is-859050944-a76c1d78826af1cd8caf18510790d1c7e99d618c-5.jpg

Image process :: Saving local image

grab remote location : https://www.convertingguide.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/westpack.packagingdigest.comhome-is-859050944-a76c1d78826af1cd8caf18510790d1c7e99d618c-5.jpg

Image exists, checking for same file size

Replacing images : WestPack-2020 - WestPack-2020 ON

New research will analyze challenges and comparisons of companies in the Netherlands versus California, two hotbeds of environmental interest and responsibility.

 

People working in jobs related to producing, packaging, distributing and selling food products face increased sustainability demands. Such demands evolved over the past 50 years, starting in the 1970s (1). Current interest in sustainability remains high amongst packaging professionals as such articles are commonly read the most often in industry trade journals such as Packaging Digest (2).

Between North America and Europe today, there are 47 standards related to the sustainability of processed foods (3). While sustainable food production and packaging are similar to the notions of circular food production and circular packaging, they are not the same. Many publications over the past few years have compared the two types of practices, with a good summary given by Korhonen (4). It’s unfortunate that in the past century we have foregone our previous sustainable and sometime circular lifestyles that were common for hundreds of years in the past (5).

Sustainable packaging design focuses on developing eco-friendly designs and production strategies. Such practices tend to be linear and do not address imbalances between input and output streams, nor address the quality of recycling well.

Many sustainable packaging programs focus on material reduction, which sometimes results in complex materials such as (plastic) laminates. Such inseparable material combinations hinder the development of products and packaging for circular systems (6).

In countries in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), plastic package recycling rates vary between 10% for the USA to 50% for the Netherlands. The net result of this deficiency is a growing waste problem as shown in Figure 1.

A new motivation for circular plastics packaging stems from China and other Asian countries deciding to stop accepting and “processing” plastic waste from around the world. In fact, these policy changes from Asia have had a negative effect on plastics collections and recycling in many European and North American communities (7) (8).

How can mid-sized food suppliers deliver circular packaging solutions?

Figure 1: Cumulative plastic waste generation and disposal (in millions of metric tons). Solid line shown historical data from 1950 to 2015; dashed lines show projections of historical trends to 2050. (Reprinted from Science Advances 19 Jul 2017: Vol. 3, no. 7, e1700782 DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.1700782.  Copyright The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Assn. for the Advancement of Science. Distributed under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License 4.0 (CC BY-NC) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/).

 

Currently, literature focuses on the theoretical implications of transition to circular systems, while practical examples of packaging concepts suited for circular systems are scarce (6). For example, reusable packaging is a circular concept that is still rarely implemented by food producing companies and value chains. But TerraCycle is carrying out some ambitious trials currently with some multi-national brand owners (9) (10).

This is not to say that leading circular design practices are not being taught at the universities that we are involved with—such as California Polytechnic University San Luis Obisbo, and the Dutch Technical Universities of Twente and Delft.

Further, most research and pilot projects about circular packaging solutions focus on the world’s largest food brand owners, with small- and medium-sized enterprises under-researched (6) (11). These larger companies control about 80% of the processed foods that appear on the shelves of typical grocery stores in North America and Europe (12).

____________________________________________________________________________________________

How can mid-sized food suppliers deliver circular packaging solutions?  WestPack 2020: Ideas. Education. New Partners. Feb. 11-13

____________________________________________________________________________________________

Recently, there has been some motivational economic case studies about larger volume business-to-business (B2B) circular packaging solutions by the Reusable Packaging Assn. (13) and the Reusable Industrial Packaging Assn. (14). Thus, we are focusing our research on mid-sized companies in the food production chain, about which little work has been done.

We will focus our research geographically to California and the Netherlands. You may ask why.

First, California and the Netherlands both actively strive to enact and implement leading environmentally friendly policies and practices related to food production and packaging (see “History and current initiatives”below). The ambitions are leading compared to peers.

Second, both of these areas are world agriculture and food production powerhouses, with California the leading state in the USA, and the Netherlands the leading agriculture exporter in the European Union (15) (16). Thus, these two areas provide a rich ecosystem for our research efforts.

Both the Netherlands and California promote, or are starting to mandate, sustainable and circular packaging solutions for all industries including food.

Thus, by carrying out parallel studies in both areas, we can learn from each other when it comes to which factors are most and least important for realizing successful circular packaging solutions. Successful circular food packaging solutions require alignment and cooperation of numerous stakeholders, as discussed below. Solutions cannot be designed, implemented and rolled out in a vacuum.

 

Three drivers of circular food packaging

From our perspective, in Figure 2, we identify three issues that need further research to put out pilot projects related to circular food packaging in both countries.

The past few years, several organizations either surveyed or wrote about consumers’ behavior related to “sustainable” products or reusable packaging of branded products (including food) (17) (18). However, these surveys are not specific enough when it comes to identifying actual consumer behavior and needs of reusable food packaging solutions on a daily or weekly basis.

Further, retail grocery stores and foodservice providers will not facilitate most circular food packaging initiatives unless there is evidence of strong consumer buy-in over longer periods of time.

How can mid-sized food suppliers deliver circular packaging solutions?

Figure 2: Drivers of Circular Food Packaging

 

Even if consumers are willing to change their behavior relative to circular-friendly packaging, economically it needs to make sense for all parties involved in the supply chain. Economic gain is difficult to substantiate and is a topic widely research and written about. Understanding the value propositions of certain kinds of circular practices can be difficult for traditional investors and banks (19).

In the Netherlands, the three biggest banks launched guidelines in 2018 for creating a common framework for financing circular economy initiatives by industry (20). Thus, there is some movement by the financial community to address the economic viability of new initiatives. However, most likely most actual projects will have to be financed by individual companies in the value chains, with perhaps consumers having to pay more for their packaged food product(s) as well.

Lastly, we need to consider the closed-loop environment impact of any new circular packaging solutions. The solution may be wanted and acceptable to consumers, and it may be profitable for the delivery value chain, but the environmental impact also needs careful consideration.

The problem with life-cycle assessment (LCA) for our research is the lack of agreement on the proper frameworks to use in carrying out the analysis (21). There are numerous frameworks and tools like COMPASS for carrying out LCA. Any LCA needs to also consider food waste, and how the results can be communicated to consumers and members of the value chain to convince them to cooperate in new initiatives.

 

Current research focus and ambitions

Our research in the Netherlands and California will focus on the following four research topic in the next two years:

1. Consumers:

• Characterize consumer behavior/needs toward specific circular packaged food products in the Netherlands and California.

• Understand consumer attitudes towards reuse, co-use or refill offerings of specific foods.

 

2. Mid-sized Food Producers:

• Identify appropriate mid-sized food suppliers and their value chains that are ripe for moving forward with circular food packaging initiatives.

• Inventory the needs of mid-sized food producers with regard to circular economy ambitions.

• Determine operational needs and technical requirements from the food producer to consumer.

 

3. Retail Grocery / Foodservice Value Chains:

• Characterize economic needs and costs from the retail perspective.

• Inventory needs of downstream members of value chain concerning distribution and reverse logistics issues related to reuse, refill, co-use, re-appropriate or recycling.

 

4. LCA, Economics and Pilot Project(s):

• Propose a circular model for one or more food products in California and the Netherlands (including economics, costs, investments needed, life cycle assessment).

• Establish a consortium of companies in the Netherlands and California willing to carry out a pilot project for the circular model proposed.

• Measure consumer behavior to the new circularly packaged food compared to non-circularly packaged food.

• Characterize and pursue additional sources of funding for implementing the pilot project for the consortium of companies.

• Learn from comparisons and contrasts between the Netherlands and California.

We intend to publish the results of research topics one to three in the first half of 2020 in  Packaging Digest. Depending upon consumer cooperation, we intend to further publish the results of our field trials at the end of 2020.  

At this time, we are looking for mid-sized (fresh) food producers, retail grocery chains, logistics service providers, and packaging companies in California and Northwest Europe to join our research and pilot project efforts in 2020. Interested companies in these areas can contact us via this form

____________________________________________________________________________________________

How can mid-sized food suppliers deliver circular packaging solutions?  WestPack 2020: Ideas. Education. New Partners. Feb. 11-13

____________________________________________________________________________________________

History and current initiatives

In past centuries, most products were recycled or reused, as there was perpetual scarcity of food and packaging materials (5). Thus, recycling focused beyond metal, paperboard and glass, to include porcelain/clay jars, cotton bags and wooden boxes amongst other packaging materials.

Over the past 100 years, in most countries of the world, food scarcity subsided, and efficient industrial production created mass-produced raw materials and packages for food production and distribution. During the 20th century, plastic packaging was also introduced into the food supply chain. The net result of this has been less food waste, more consumer choice and convenience, longer supply chains, and much lower prices for food.

As packaging pollution increases worldwide, numerous government and non-profit organizations are implementing laws and initiatives to turn the tide against simple linear production of food. Recent Extended Product Responsibility (ERP) policies extend a manufacturer’s responsibility for reducing packaging impacts downstream, when consumers are done with them (22) (23). Over the past 30 years, more than 300 ERP laws have been passed and implemented in both the European Union and in the USA, with a good overview provided by CalRecycle (24) and OECD (25). Of these laws, only 17% of them are related to actual packaging.

The OECD reports that in the European Union recycling rates of packaging vary between 29% and 84% in 2014, with a target of 55% for all plastic waste by 2025. In 2016, in the European Union, recycling of plastic packaging reached a level of 40.8% and, for the first time, recycling rates exceeded energy recovery and landfill rates (26). Collection of plastic packaging in the Netherlands is higher, close to 50% in 2019 (27), but unfortunately only 35% of the collected waste ends up being recycled into new plastic, resulting in a yield of only 17%.

There are several reasons for such a low yield, which are beyond the scope of this article. But some of the main limitations behind using recycled plastics for food are:

• Food safety requirements for recycled plastics used for food (28) (29).

• Competition in undifferentiated markets for recycled plastic versus virgin plastics (30).

• Many new virgin plastics production plants coming online driven by cheap natural gas prices, resulting in cheap virgin materials (31).

Now let’s look at specific initiative and activities in California and the Netherlands.

Recently, in California, a new Senate Bill (SB-54) called California Circular Economy and Plastic Pollution Reduction Act is going through committee processes (32). The goal of this law is to achieve 75% recycling rates by 2030, and to reduce single-use packaging by 75%. Currently, in California less than 9% of plastic is recycled.

Historically, California has depended on exporting plastics and paper packaging streams to China and other countries—which is no longer possible. It’s noteworthy that about 75 organizations in and outside the state support the new bill, while seven major organizations—including the Grocery Manufacturers Assn., Plastics Industry Assn. and Household and Commercial Products Assn.—oppose the new bill.

A longer campaign has existed to educate California consumers and small- and medium-sized businesses about reusables for food products and food production. The Use Reusables campaign is a joint project of Alameda County (CA) public agency  and the Reusable Packaging Assn. (RPA). Launched in 2007, the campaign’s goal is to help businesses and institutions assess and optimize the transport packaging materials and systems they use, either within their manufacturing process or for product distribution (33). Thus far, the focus has been on totes, crates, intermediate bulk containers and reusable strapping to secure bundled bulk pallets of products in business-to-business (B2B) closed-loop deliveries.

In the Netherlands, the government launched the program A Circular Economy in the Netherlands by 2050 in September 2016. In this program, a nationwide plan is drawn up by multiple ministries to function as a vision for the successful implementation of the circular economy. The goal formulated in this report is to reduce the amount of primary resources used in the Netherlands by 50% in 2030, and to become completely circular by 2050 (34). In addition, the government facilitated the creation and support of the website Holland Circular Hotspot. It is a private public platform in which companies, knowledge institutes and (local) authorities collaborate internationally to exchange knowledge and stimulate entrepreneurship in the field of circular economy (35).

In 2014, as part of the Dutch government’s efforts to ramp up extended producer responsibility of packaging, the “Packaging Waste Fund” was established by producers and importers. This fund’s purpose is to collectively meet the extended producer responsibilities as stated in the national Packaging Decree and Packaging Agreement between industry and the government. It is a not-for-profit organization governed by a board of directors, who are themselves appointed by producers and importers (36).

Thus, as of 2018, all producers and importers of end-user consumer packaged products must pay levies into the waste fund, which vary between 2 and 78 euro-cents per kilogram (Note: B2B logistics packaging is not included) (37). Manufacturers packaging consumer products can qualify for lower levies if they agree to use a certain percentage of recycled content in their packages. Thus, economic incentives are being created to use recycled streams of materials. This organization reports that, in 2017, the Dutch recycled 87% of paper and paperboard, 86% glass, 95% metal, 73% wood and 50% plastic.

The Packaging Waste Fund resulted in the creation of the Netherlands Institute for Sustainable Packaging (KIDV), which is funded for 10 years at 2M euros per year by the fund. The KIDV employs a staff of 16 and acts as a national clearing house for developing, sharing and bringing knowledge together in the form of events, collaborative research, tools and expert advice (38). The KIDV is similar to the non-profit member-supported American Sustainable Packaging Coalition, which has been active since 2004.

A lot of the KIDV’s current activities focus on plastics, as the Netherlands already recycles a majority of non-plastics. For example, last July, they initiated a Community of Practice (CoP) with a consortium of companies facing similar challenges related to developing metallized flexible packaging that is suitable for the circular economy (39). The government decided that one of the five focus areas of its circular economy initiatives should focus on plastics.

In private industry, in February 2019, Dutch Grocery Store Organization made up of 24 corporate members agreed to reducing all packaging in their retail stores by 20% by 2025 (40). Initial efforts will focus on fruits and vegetables and on increasing recycled content of packaging. Another organization, MVO (Dutch Foundation for Socially Responsible Entrepreneurship) is also working on facilitating circular economy projects and matchmaking between companies. Their Future Proof Community website has more than 3,500 companies and acts as a matchmaker for companies that put out sustainable or circular challenges and companies suggesting solutions (41).

    

 

REFERENCES

1. Kidd, Charles V. The evolution of sustainability. J Agric Environ Ethics, Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1992. Vol. 1.

2. Lingle, Rick. Packaging Digest, Jul. 15, 2019. Sustainability drives the top five in food and beverage packaging.

3. International Trade Centre. Sustainability Map. All processed foods in Europe and North America.

4. Jouni Korhonena, Cali Nuurb, Andreas Feldmann, Seyoum Eshetu Birkiea. Circular economy as an essentially contested concept. Journal of Cleaner Production, Elsivier, Feb. 25, 2018. Vol. 175.

5. Trentmann, Frank. Empire of Things. Penquin Random House UK Books, 2016, pp. 624-654.

6. Bjorn de Koeijer, Renee Wever, Jorg Henseler. Realizing Product-Packaging Combinations in Circular Systems: Shaping the Research Agenda. 2017, Vol. 30.

7. Katz, Cheryl. Piling Up: How China’s Ban on Importing Waste Has Stalled Global Recycling. Yale University, Yale School of Forrestry & Environmental Studies, Mar. 7, 2019.

8. Erin McCormick, Charlotte Simmonds, Jessica Glenza, Katharine Gammon. Americans’ plastic recycling is dumped in landfills, investigation shows. The Guardian. Jun. 21, 2019.

9. Makower, Joel. Loop’s launch brings reusable packaging to the world’s biggest brands. GreenBiz Group, Jan. 24, 2019.

10. Devenyns, Jessi. Why reuseable food packaging has a promising future. FoodDive, Jun. 25, 2019.

11. Szaky, Tom. The Future of Packaging. Oakland: Berrett-Koehler Publishsers Inc., 2019.

12. Kramer, Anna. These 10 companies make a lot of the food we buy. Here’s how we made them better. Oxfam. [Online] Dec. 10, 2014. [Cited: Jul. 25, 2019.] https://www.oxfamamerica.org/explore/stories/these-10-companies-make-a-lot-of-the-food-we-buy-heres-how-we-made-them-better/.

13. Reusable Packaging Assn. A cost comparison model for reusable transport packaging. 102, June 2016.

14. Studies and Report. Reusable Industrial Packaging Assn. [Online] Aug. 18, 2019. [Cited: Aug. 18, 2019.] https://www.reusablepackaging.org/studies-and-reports/.

15. National Geographic. Tiny Country Feeds the World. September 2017.

16. California Department of Food and Agriculture. California Agricultural Production Statistics. 2017.

17. Wharton University of Pennsylvania. Reusable Packaging from Big Brands: Will Consumers Buy In? Wharton Business School, Knowledge@Wharton, Feb. 12, 2019.

18. Nielson. Consumer-Goods’ Brands That Demonstrate Commitment To Sustainability Outperform Those That Don’t. [Webpage]. Oct. 12, 2015.

19. Judith Kas, Bram Bet & Daphne Truijens. Barriers and Best Practices for the Circular Economy. SMO Promovendi. Circular Minds 2017-2018.

20. Rabobank Nederland. ABN AMRO, ING and Rabobank launch finance guidelines for circular economy. Rabobank Nederland Press Releases. [Online] Jul. 9, 2018. [Cited: Aug. 25, 2019.] https://www.rabobank.com/en/press/search/2018/20180702-abn-amro-ing-and-rabobank-launch-finance-guidelines-for-circular-economy.html.

21. Erik Pauer*, Bernhard Wohner, Victoria Heinrich and Manfred Tacker.Assessing the Environmental Sustainability of Food Packaging: An Extended Life Cycle Assessment including Packaging-Related Food Losses and Waste and Circularity Assessment. Basel: MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland, 11 2019, Sustainability, p. 925. Section of Packaging Technology and Resource Management, University of Applied Science, 1030 Vienna.

22. European Union. Closing the loop: Commission adopts ambitious new Circular Economy Package to boost competitiveness, create jobs and generate sustainable growth. Brussels: European Union, Dec. 2, 2015.

23. California Product Stewardship Counsel. California ERP Legislation. https://www.calpsc.org/.[Online] Aug. 13, 2019. [Cited: Aug. 13, 2019.] https://www.calpsc.org/legislation.

24. CalRecycle California Goverment. California Recylce Policy and Law. [Online] Jul. 19, 2019. [Cited: Aug. 13, 2019.] https://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/epr/policylaw.

25. OECD. OECD (2016), Extended Producer Responsibility: Updated Guidance for Efficient Waste Management, OECD Publishing, Paris. [Online] Sept. 16, 2016. [Cited: Aug. 13, 2019.] https://www.oecd-ilibrary.org/sites/9789264256385-4-en/index.html?itemId=/content/component/9789264256385-4-en.

26. PlasticsEurope Assn. of Plastics Manufacturers. Plastics the Facts 2017. European Assn. of Plastics Manufacturers, 2018.

27. Berenschot, Joost Krebbekx and Gijs Duivenvoorde – and Innovation, Siem Haffmans – Partners for. Roadmap towards increasing the sustainability of plastics packaging. NRK Verpakkingen, 2018. p. 74.

28. European Food Safety Authority. Plastics and Plastics Recycling. [Online] [Cited: Aug. 24, 2019.] https://www.efsa.europa.eu/en/topics/topic/plastics-and-plastic-recycling.

29. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Recycled Plastics in Food Packaging. [Online] Mar. 21, 2018. [Cited: Aug. 24, 2019.] https://www.fda.gov/food/packaging-food-contact-substances-fcs/recycled-plastics-food-packaging.

30. OECD. Improving Markets for Recycled Plastics: Trends, Prospects and Policy Responses,. Paris : OECD, 2018.

31. Project, The Climate Reality, [prod.]. Ethane Cracker Plants What Are They. Washington D.C.: The Climate Reality Project, Oct. 23, 2018.

32. Senators Allen, Skinner, Stern and Wiener. SB-54 California Circular Economy and Plastics Pollution Reduction Act. [leginfo.legislature.ca.gov]. Sacramento, California, USA : California State Legislature, Aug. 14, 2019.

33. Reusables Organization About Page. Usereusables Organization. [Online] [Cited: Aug. 18, 2019.] http://usereusables.org/about-reusables.

34. Dutch Ministry of Infrastructure and the Environment and the Ministry of Economic Affairs. The Circular Economy. Den Haag: September 2016.

35. TNO. Holland Circular Hotspot Home Page. Holland Circular Hotspot. [Online] 2019. [Cited: Aug. 21, 2019.] https://hollandcircularhotspot.nl/en/.

36. Dutch Packaging Waste Fund Home Page. Afvalfondsverpakkingen.nl. [Online] 2019. https://afvalfondsverpakkingen.nl/en/packaging-waste-fund.

37. Policy Afvalfonds Verpakkingen (Packaging Waste Fund). Afvalfondsverpakkingen.nl. [Online] Dec. 20, 2018. [Cited: Aug. 21, 2019.] https://afvalfondsverpakkingen.nl/a/i/Beleid-Overeenkomsten/Policy-2019.pdf.

38. KIDV. Organizational Structure. KIDV Netherlands Institute for Sustainable Packaging. [Online] [Cited: Aug. 21, 2019.] https://www.kidv.nl/228/over-het-kidv.html?ch=EN#organizational-structure.

39. Netherlands Institute for Sustainable Packaging (KIDV). Brand owners combine forces to address challenges to make flexible packaging circular. Jul. 16, 2019. Press Release.

40. Centraal Bureau Levensmiddelenhandel (CBL). 20% minder verpakkingen in de supermarkt in 2025. CBL Laaste Nieuws . [Online] Feb. 15, 2019. [Cited: Aug. 25, 2019.] https://www.cbl.nl/consumenten-hebben-weer-vertrouwen-in-de-supermarkt-2/.

41. MOV Nederland. Future Proof Community. Future Proof Community. [Online] Aug. 24, 2019. [Cited: Aug. 24, 2019.] https://futureproof.community/.

____________________________________________________________________________________________

Fist-bumpFind your success! Subscribe to free Packaging Digest enewsletters.

 

Local save:https://www.convertingguide.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/www.packagingdigest.comFist-bump-shutterstock_44-1c48a5daf3682b2600be72fda5a8517ef56d7b3d-4.jpg

Image process :: Saving local image

grab remote location : https://www.convertingguide.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/www.packagingdigest.comFist-bump-shutterstock_44-1c48a5daf3682b2600be72fda5a8517ef56d7b3d-4.jpg

Image exists, checking for same file size

Replacing images : Fist-bump - Fist-bump ON

New research will analyze challenges and comparisons of companies in the Netherlands versus California, two hotbeds of environmental interest and responsibility.

 

People working in jobs related to producing, packaging, distributing and selling food products face increased sustainability demands. Such demands evolved over the past 50 years, starting in the 1970s (1). Current interest in sustainability remains high amongst packaging professionals as such articles are commonly read the most often in industry trade journals such as Packaging Digest (2).

Between North America and Europe today, there are 47 standards related to the sustainability of processed foods (3). While sustainable food production and packaging are similar to the notions of circular food production and circular packaging, they are not the same. Many publications over the past few years have compared the two types of practices, with a good summary given by Korhonen (4). It’s unfortunate that in the past century we have foregone our previous sustainable and sometime circular lifestyles that were common for hundreds of years in the past (5).

Sustainable packaging design focuses on developing eco-friendly designs and production strategies. Such practices tend to be linear and do not address imbalances between input and output streams, nor address the quality of recycling well.

Many sustainable packaging programs focus on material reduction, which sometimes results in complex materials such as (plastic) laminates. Such inseparable material combinations hinder the development of products and packaging for circular systems (6).

In countries in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), plastic package recycling rates vary between 10% for the USA to 50% for the Netherlands. The net result of this deficiency is a growing waste problem as shown in Figure 1.

A new motivation for circular plastics packaging stems from China and other Asian countries deciding to stop accepting and “processing” plastic waste from around the world. In fact, these policy changes from Asia have had a negative effect on plastics collections and recycling in many European and North American communities (7) (8).

How can mid-sized food suppliers deliver circular packaging solutions?

Figure 1: Cumulative plastic waste generation and disposal (in millions of metric tons). Solid line shown historical data from 1950 to 2015; dashed lines show projections of historical trends to 2050. (Reprinted from Science Advances 19 Jul 2017: Vol. 3, no. 7, e1700782 DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.1700782.  Copyright The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Assn. for the Advancement of Science. Distributed under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License 4.0 (CC BY-NC) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/).

 

Currently, literature focuses on the theoretical implications of transition to circular systems, while practical examples of packaging concepts suited for circular systems are scarce (6). For example, reusable packaging is a circular concept that is still rarely implemented by food producing companies and value chains. But TerraCycle is carrying out some ambitious trials currently with some multi-national brand owners (9) (10).

This is not to say that leading circular design practices are not being taught at the universities that we are involved with—such as California Polytechnic University San Luis Obisbo, and the Dutch Technical Universities of Twente and Delft.

Further, most research and pilot projects about circular packaging solutions focus on the world’s largest food brand owners, with small- and medium-sized enterprises under-researched (6) (11). These larger companies control about 80% of the processed foods that appear on the shelves of typical grocery stores in North America and Europe (12).

____________________________________________________________________________________________

How can mid-sized food suppliers deliver circular packaging solutions?  WestPack 2020: Ideas. Education. New Partners. Feb. 11-13

____________________________________________________________________________________________

Recently, there has been some motivational economic case studies about larger volume business-to-business (B2B) circular packaging solutions by the Reusable Packaging Assn. (13) and the Reusable Industrial Packaging Assn. (14). Thus, we are focusing our research on mid-sized companies in the food production chain, about which little work has been done.

We will focus our research geographically to California and the Netherlands. You may ask why.

First, California and the Netherlands both actively strive to enact and implement leading environmentally friendly policies and practices related to food production and packaging (see “History and current initiatives”below). The ambitions are leading compared to peers.

Second, both of these areas are world agriculture and food production powerhouses, with California the leading state in the USA, and the Netherlands the leading agriculture exporter in the European Union (15) (16). Thus, these two areas provide a rich ecosystem for our research efforts.

Both the Netherlands and California promote, or are starting to mandate, sustainable and circular packaging solutions for all industries including food.

Thus, by carrying out parallel studies in both areas, we can learn from each other when it comes to which factors are most and least important for realizing successful circular packaging solutions. Successful circular food packaging solutions require alignment and cooperation of numerous stakeholders, as discussed below. Solutions cannot be designed, implemented and rolled out in a vacuum.

 

Three drivers of circular food packaging

From our perspective, in Figure 2, we identify three issues that need further research to put out pilot projects related to circular food packaging in both countries.

The past few years, several organizations either surveyed or wrote about consumers’ behavior related to “sustainable” products or reusable packaging of branded products (including food) (17) (18). However, these surveys are not specific enough when it comes to identifying actual consumer behavior and needs of reusable food packaging solutions on a daily or weekly basis.

Further, retail grocery stores and foodservice providers will not facilitate most circular food packaging initiatives unless there is evidence of strong consumer buy-in over longer periods of time.

How can mid-sized food suppliers deliver circular packaging solutions?

Figure 2: Drivers of Circular Food Packaging

 

Even if consumers are willing to change their behavior relative to circular-friendly packaging, economically it needs to make sense for all parties involved in the supply chain. Economic gain is difficult to substantiate and is a topic widely research and written about. Understanding the value propositions of certain kinds of circular practices can be difficult for traditional investors and banks (19).

In the Netherlands, the three biggest banks launched guidelines in 2018 for creating a common framework for financing circular economy initiatives by industry (20). Thus, there is some movement by the financial community to address the economic viability of new initiatives. However, most likely most actual projects will have to be financed by individual companies in the value chains, with perhaps consumers having to pay more for their packaged food product(s) as well.

Lastly, we need to consider the closed-loop environment impact of any new circular packaging solutions. The solution may be wanted and acceptable to consumers, and it may be profitable for the delivery value chain, but the environmental impact also needs careful consideration.

The problem with life-cycle assessment (LCA) for our research is the lack of agreement on the proper frameworks to use in carrying out the analysis (21). There are numerous frameworks and tools like COMPASS for carrying out LCA. Any LCA needs to also consider food waste, and how the results can be communicated to consumers and members of the value chain to convince them to cooperate in new initiatives.

 

Current research focus and ambitions

Our research in the Netherlands and California will focus on the following four research topic in the next two years:

1. Consumers:

• Characterize consumer behavior/needs toward specific circular packaged food products in the Netherlands and California.

• Understand consumer attitudes towards reuse, co-use or refill offerings of specific foods.

 

2. Mid-sized Food Producers:

• Identify appropriate mid-sized food suppliers and their value chains that are ripe for moving forward with circular food packaging initiatives.

• Inventory the needs of mid-sized food producers with regard to circular economy ambitions.

• Determine operational needs and technical requirements from the food producer to consumer.

 

3. Retail Grocery / Foodservice Value Chains:

• Characterize economic needs and costs from the retail perspective.

• Inventory needs of downstream members of value chain concerning distribution and reverse logistics issues related to reuse, refill, co-use, re-appropriate or recycling.

 

4. LCA, Economics and Pilot Project(s):

• Propose a circular model for one or more food products in California and the Netherlands (including economics, costs, investments needed, life cycle assessment).

• Establish a consortium of companies in the Netherlands and California willing to carry out a pilot project for the circular model proposed.

• Measure consumer behavior to the new circularly packaged food compared to non-circularly packaged food.

• Characterize and pursue additional sources of funding for implementing the pilot project for the consortium of companies.

• Learn from comparisons and contrasts between the Netherlands and California.

We intend to publish the results of research topics one to three in the first half of 2020 in  Packaging Digest. Depending upon consumer cooperation, we intend to further publish the results of our field trials at the end of 2020.  

At this time, we are looking for mid-sized (fresh) food producers, retail grocery chains, logistics service providers, and packaging companies in California and Northwest Europe to join our research and pilot project efforts in 2020. Interested companies in these areas can contact us via this form

____________________________________________________________________________________________

How can mid-sized food suppliers deliver circular packaging solutions?  WestPack 2020: Ideas. Education. New Partners. Feb. 11-13

____________________________________________________________________________________________

History and current initiatives

In past centuries, most products were recycled or reused, as there was perpetual scarcity of food and packaging materials (5). Thus, recycling focused beyond metal, paperboard and glass, to include porcelain/clay jars, cotton bags and wooden boxes amongst other packaging materials.

Over the past 100 years, in most countries of the world, food scarcity subsided, and efficient industrial production created mass-produced raw materials and packages for food production and distribution. During the 20th century, plastic packaging was also introduced into the food supply chain. The net result of this has been less food waste, more consumer choice and convenience, longer supply chains, and much lower prices for food.

As packaging pollution increases worldwide, numerous government and non-profit organizations are implementing laws and initiatives to turn the tide against simple linear production of food. Recent Extended Product Responsibility (ERP) policies extend a manufacturer’s responsibility for reducing packaging impacts downstream, when consumers are done with them (22) (23). Over the past 30 years, more than 300 ERP laws have been passed and implemented in both the European Union and in the USA, with a good overview provided by CalRecycle (24) and OECD (25). Of these laws, only 17% of them are related to actual packaging.

The OECD reports that in the European Union recycling rates of packaging vary between 29% and 84% in 2014, with a target of 55% for all plastic waste by 2025. In 2016, in the European Union, recycling of plastic packaging reached a level of 40.8% and, for the first time, recycling rates exceeded energy recovery and landfill rates (26). Collection of plastic packaging in the Netherlands is higher, close to 50% in 2019 (27), but unfortunately only 35% of the collected waste ends up being recycled into new plastic, resulting in a yield of only 17%.

There are several reasons for such a low yield, which are beyond the scope of this article. But some of the main limitations behind using recycled plastics for food are:

• Food safety requirements for recycled plastics used for food (28) (29).

• Competition in undifferentiated markets for recycled plastic versus virgin plastics (30).

• Many new virgin plastics production plants coming online driven by cheap natural gas prices, resulting in cheap virgin materials (31).

Now let’s look at specific initiative and activities in California and the Netherlands.

Recently, in California, a new Senate Bill (SB-54) called California Circular Economy and Plastic Pollution Reduction Act is going through committee processes (32). The goal of this law is to achieve 75% recycling rates by 2030, and to reduce single-use packaging by 75%. Currently, in California less than 9% of plastic is recycled.

Historically, California has depended on exporting plastics and paper packaging streams to China and other countries—which is no longer possible. It’s noteworthy that about 75 organizations in and outside the state support the new bill, while seven major organizations—including the Grocery Manufacturers Assn., Plastics Industry Assn. and Household and Commercial Products Assn.—oppose the new bill.

A longer campaign has existed to educate California consumers and small- and medium-sized businesses about reusables for food products and food production. The Use Reusables campaign is a joint project of Alameda County (CA) public agency  and the Reusable Packaging Assn. (RPA). Launched in 2007, the campaign’s goal is to help businesses and institutions assess and optimize the transport packaging materials and systems they use, either within their manufacturing process or for product distribution (33). Thus far, the focus has been on totes, crates, intermediate bulk containers and reusable strapping to secure bundled bulk pallets of products in business-to-business (B2B) closed-loop deliveries.

In the Netherlands, the government launched the program A Circular Economy in the Netherlands by 2050 in September 2016. In this program, a nationwide plan is drawn up by multiple ministries to function as a vision for the successful implementation of the circular economy. The goal formulated in this report is to reduce the amount of primary resources used in the Netherlands by 50% in 2030, and to become completely circular by 2050 (34). In addition, the government facilitated the creation and support of the website Holland Circular Hotspot. It is a private public platform in which companies, knowledge institutes and (local) authorities collaborate internationally to exchange knowledge and stimulate entrepreneurship in the field of circular economy (35).

In 2014, as part of the Dutch government’s efforts to ramp up extended producer responsibility of packaging, the “Packaging Waste Fund” was established by producers and importers. This fund’s purpose is to collectively meet the extended producer responsibilities as stated in the national Packaging Decree and Packaging Agreement between industry and the government. It is a not-for-profit organization governed by a board of directors, who are themselves appointed by producers and importers (36).

Thus, as of 2018, all producers and importers of end-user consumer packaged products must pay levies into the waste fund, which vary between 2 and 78 euro-cents per kilogram (Note: B2B logistics packaging is not included) (37). Manufacturers packaging consumer products can qualify for lower levies if they agree to use a certain percentage of recycled content in their packages. Thus, economic incentives are being created to use recycled streams of materials. This organization reports that, in 2017, the Dutch recycled 87% of paper and paperboard, 86% glass, 95% metal, 73% wood and 50% plastic.

The Packaging Waste Fund resulted in the creation of the Netherlands Institute for Sustainable Packaging (KIDV), which is funded for 10 years at 2M euros per year by the fund. The KIDV employs a staff of 16 and acts as a national clearing house for developing, sharing and bringing knowledge together in the form of events, collaborative research, tools and expert advice (38). The KIDV is similar to the non-profit member-supported American Sustainable Packaging Coalition, which has been active since 2004.

A lot of the KIDV’s current activities focus on plastics, as the Netherlands already recycles a majority of non-plastics. For example, last July, they initiated a Community of Practice (CoP) with a consortium of companies facing similar challenges related to developing metallized flexible packaging that is suitable for the circular economy (39). The government decided that one of the five focus areas of its circular economy initiatives should focus on plastics.

In private industry, in February 2019, Dutch Grocery Store Organization made up of 24 corporate members agreed to reducing all packaging in their retail stores by 20% by 2025 (40). Initial efforts will focus on fruits and vegetables and on increasing recycled content of packaging. Another organization, MVO (Dutch Foundation for Socially Responsible Entrepreneurship) is also working on facilitating circular economy projects and matchmaking between companies. Their Future Proof Community website has more than 3,500 companies and acts as a matchmaker for companies that put out sustainable or circular challenges and companies suggesting solutions (41).

    

 

REFERENCES

1. Kidd, Charles V. The evolution of sustainability. J Agric Environ Ethics, Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1992. Vol. 1.

2. Lingle, Rick. Packaging Digest, Jul. 15, 2019. Sustainability drives the top five in food and beverage packaging.

3. International Trade Centre. Sustainability Map. All processed foods in Europe and North America.

4. Jouni Korhonena, Cali Nuurb, Andreas Feldmann, Seyoum Eshetu Birkiea. Circular economy as an essentially contested concept. Journal of Cleaner Production, Elsivier, Feb. 25, 2018. Vol. 175.

5. Trentmann, Frank. Empire of Things. Penquin Random House UK Books, 2016, pp. 624-654.

6. Bjorn de Koeijer, Renee Wever, Jorg Henseler. Realizing Product-Packaging Combinations in Circular Systems: Shaping the Research Agenda. 2017, Vol. 30.

7. Katz, Cheryl. Piling Up: How China’s Ban on Importing Waste Has Stalled Global Recycling. Yale University, Yale School of Forrestry & Environmental Studies, Mar. 7, 2019.

8. Erin McCormick, Charlotte Simmonds, Jessica Glenza, Katharine Gammon. Americans’ plastic recycling is dumped in landfills, investigation shows. The Guardian. Jun. 21, 2019.

9. Makower, Joel. Loop’s launch brings reusable packaging to the world’s biggest brands. GreenBiz Group, Jan. 24, 2019.

10. Devenyns, Jessi. Why reuseable food packaging has a promising future. FoodDive, Jun. 25, 2019.

11. Szaky, Tom. The Future of Packaging. Oakland: Berrett-Koehler Publishsers Inc., 2019.

12. Kramer, Anna. These 10 companies make a lot of the food we buy. Here’s how we made them better. Oxfam. [Online] Dec. 10, 2014. [Cited: Jul. 25, 2019.] https://www.oxfamamerica.org/explore/stories/these-10-companies-make-a-lot-of-the-food-we-buy-heres-how-we-made-them-better/.

13. Reusable Packaging Assn. A cost comparison model for reusable transport packaging. 102, June 2016.

14. Studies and Report. Reusable Industrial Packaging Assn. [Online] Aug. 18, 2019. [Cited: Aug. 18, 2019.] https://www.reusablepackaging.org/studies-and-reports/.

15. National Geographic. Tiny Country Feeds the World. September 2017.

16. California Department of Food and Agriculture. California Agricultural Production Statistics. 2017.

17. Wharton University of Pennsylvania. Reusable Packaging from Big Brands: Will Consumers Buy In? Wharton Business School, Knowledge@Wharton, Feb. 12, 2019.

18. Nielson. Consumer-Goods’ Brands That Demonstrate Commitment To Sustainability Outperform Those That Don’t. [Webpage]. Oct. 12, 2015.

19. Judith Kas, Bram Bet & Daphne Truijens. Barriers and Best Practices for the Circular Economy. SMO Promovendi. Circular Minds 2017-2018.

20. Rabobank Nederland. ABN AMRO, ING and Rabobank launch finance guidelines for circular economy. Rabobank Nederland Press Releases. [Online] Jul. 9, 2018. [Cited: Aug. 25, 2019.] https://www.rabobank.com/en/press/search/2018/20180702-abn-amro-ing-and-rabobank-launch-finance-guidelines-for-circular-economy.html.

21. Erik Pauer*, Bernhard Wohner, Victoria Heinrich and Manfred Tacker.Assessing the Environmental Sustainability of Food Packaging: An Extended Life Cycle Assessment including Packaging-Related Food Losses and Waste and Circularity Assessment. Basel: MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland, 11 2019, Sustainability, p. 925. Section of Packaging Technology and Resource Management, University of Applied Science, 1030 Vienna.

22. European Union. Closing the loop: Commission adopts ambitious new Circular Economy Package to boost competitiveness, create jobs and generate sustainable growth. Brussels: European Union, Dec. 2, 2015.

23. California Product Stewardship Counsel. California ERP Legislation. https://www.calpsc.org/.[Online] Aug. 13, 2019. [Cited: Aug. 13, 2019.] https://www.calpsc.org/legislation.

24. CalRecycle California Goverment. California Recylce Policy and Law. [Online] Jul. 19, 2019. [Cited: Aug. 13, 2019.] https://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/epr/policylaw.

25. OECD. OECD (2016), Extended Producer Responsibility: Updated Guidance for Efficient Waste Management, OECD Publishing, Paris. [Online] Sept. 16, 2016. [Cited: Aug. 13, 2019.] https://www.oecd-ilibrary.org/sites/9789264256385-4-en/index.html?itemId=/content/component/9789264256385-4-en.

26. PlasticsEurope Assn. of Plastics Manufacturers. Plastics the Facts 2017. European Assn. of Plastics Manufacturers, 2018.

27. Berenschot, Joost Krebbekx and Gijs Duivenvoorde – and Innovation, Siem Haffmans – Partners for. Roadmap towards increasing the sustainability of plastics packaging. NRK Verpakkingen, 2018. p. 74.

28. European Food Safety Authority. Plastics and Plastics Recycling. [Online] [Cited: Aug. 24, 2019.] https://www.efsa.europa.eu/en/topics/topic/plastics-and-plastic-recycling.

29. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Recycled Plastics in Food Packaging. [Online] Mar. 21, 2018. [Cited: Aug. 24, 2019.] https://www.fda.gov/food/packaging-food-contact-substances-fcs/recycled-plastics-food-packaging.

30. OECD. Improving Markets for Recycled Plastics: Trends, Prospects and Policy Responses,. Paris : OECD, 2018.

31. Project, The Climate Reality, [prod.]. Ethane Cracker Plants What Are They. Washington D.C.: The Climate Reality Project, Oct. 23, 2018.

32. Senators Allen, Skinner, Stern and Wiener. SB-54 California Circular Economy and Plastics Pollution Reduction Act. [leginfo.legislature.ca.gov]. Sacramento, California, USA : California State Legislature, Aug. 14, 2019.

33. Reusables Organization About Page. Usereusables Organization. [Online] [Cited: Aug. 18, 2019.] http://usereusables.org/about-reusables.

34. Dutch Ministry of Infrastructure and the Environment and the Ministry of Economic Affairs. The Circular Economy. Den Haag: September 2016.

35. TNO. Holland Circular Hotspot Home Page. Holland Circular Hotspot. [Online] 2019. [Cited: Aug. 21, 2019.] https://hollandcircularhotspot.nl/en/.

36. Dutch Packaging Waste Fund Home Page. Afvalfondsverpakkingen.nl. [Online] 2019. https://afvalfondsverpakkingen.nl/en/packaging-waste-fund.

37. Policy Afvalfonds Verpakkingen (Packaging Waste Fund). Afvalfondsverpakkingen.nl. [Online] Dec. 20, 2018. [Cited: Aug. 21, 2019.] https://afvalfondsverpakkingen.nl/a/i/Beleid-Overeenkomsten/Policy-2019.pdf.

38. KIDV. Organizational Structure. KIDV Netherlands Institute for Sustainable Packaging. [Online] [Cited: Aug. 21, 2019.] https://www.kidv.nl/228/over-het-kidv.html?ch=EN#organizational-structure.

39. Netherlands Institute for Sustainable Packaging (KIDV). Brand owners combine forces to address challenges to make flexible packaging circular. Jul. 16, 2019. Press Release.

40. Centraal Bureau Levensmiddelenhandel (CBL). 20% minder verpakkingen in de supermarkt in 2025. CBL Laaste Nieuws . [Online] Feb. 15, 2019. [Cited: Aug. 25, 2019.] https://www.cbl.nl/consumenten-hebben-weer-vertrouwen-in-de-supermarkt-2/.

41. MOV Nederland. Future Proof Community. Future Proof Community. [Online] Aug. 24, 2019. [Cited: Aug. 24, 2019.] https://futureproof.community/.

____________________________________________________________________________________________

Fist-bumpFind your success! Subscribe to free Packaging Digest enewsletters.

 

Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Uncategorized – Converting Guide [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.convertingguide.com [syndication_source_id] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed_id] => 19 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2019/11/15/how-can-mid-sized-food-suppliers-deliver-circular-packaging-solutions/ [syndication_item_hash] => 75623eb20b8e8a68efeae7906a32db66 )

Execute : Enclosure images

Enclosure save:

Array ( [0] => )

No match on

Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :How can mid-sized food suppliers deliver circular packaging solutions?

Array ( [post_title] => How can mid-sized food suppliers deliver circular packaging solutions? [post_content] =>

New research will analyze challenges and comparisons of companies in the Netherlands versus California, two hotbeds of environmental interest and responsibility.

 

People working in jobs related to producing, packaging, distributing and selling food products face increased sustainability demands. Such demands evolved over the past 50 years, starting in the 1970s (1). Current interest in sustainability remains high amongst packaging professionals as such articles are commonly read the most often in industry trade journals such as Packaging Digest (2).

Between North America and Europe today, there are 47 standards related to the sustainability of processed foods (3). While sustainable food production and packaging are similar to the notions of circular food production and circular packaging, they are not the same. Many publications over the past few years have compared the two types of practices, with a good summary given by Korhonen (4). It’s unfortunate that in the past century we have foregone our previous sustainable and sometime circular lifestyles that were common for hundreds of years in the past (5).

Sustainable packaging design focuses on developing eco-friendly designs and production strategies. Such practices tend to be linear and do not address imbalances between input and output streams, nor address the quality of recycling well.

Many sustainable packaging programs focus on material reduction, which sometimes results in complex materials such as (plastic) laminates. Such inseparable material combinations hinder the development of products and packaging for circular systems (6).

In countries in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), plastic package recycling rates vary between 10% for the USA to 50% for the Netherlands. The net result of this deficiency is a growing waste problem as shown in Figure 1.

A new motivation for circular plastics packaging stems from China and other Asian countries deciding to stop accepting and “processing” plastic waste from around the world. In fact, these policy changes from Asia have had a negative effect on plastics collections and recycling in many European and North American communities (7) (8).

How can mid-sized food suppliers deliver circular packaging solutions?

Figure 1: Cumulative plastic waste generation and disposal (in millions of metric tons). Solid line shown historical data from 1950 to 2015; dashed lines show projections of historical trends to 2050. (Reprinted from Science Advances 19 Jul 2017: Vol. 3, no. 7, e1700782 DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.1700782.  Copyright The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Assn. for the Advancement of Science. Distributed under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License 4.0 (CC BY-NC) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/).

 

Currently, literature focuses on the theoretical implications of transition to circular systems, while practical examples of packaging concepts suited for circular systems are scarce (6). For example, reusable packaging is a circular concept that is still rarely implemented by food producing companies and value chains. But TerraCycle is carrying out some ambitious trials currently with some multi-national brand owners (9) (10).

This is not to say that leading circular design practices are not being taught at the universities that we are involved with—such as California Polytechnic University San Luis Obisbo, and the Dutch Technical Universities of Twente and Delft.

Further, most research and pilot projects about circular packaging solutions focus on the world’s largest food brand owners, with small- and medium-sized enterprises under-researched (6) (11). These larger companies control about 80% of the processed foods that appear on the shelves of typical grocery stores in North America and Europe (12).

____________________________________________________________________________________________

How can mid-sized food suppliers deliver circular packaging solutions?  WestPack 2020: Ideas. Education. New Partners. Feb. 11-13

____________________________________________________________________________________________

Recently, there has been some motivational economic case studies about larger volume business-to-business (B2B) circular packaging solutions by the Reusable Packaging Assn. (13) and the Reusable Industrial Packaging Assn. (14). Thus, we are focusing our research on mid-sized companies in the food production chain, about which little work has been done.

We will focus our research geographically to California and the Netherlands. You may ask why.

First, California and the Netherlands both actively strive to enact and implement leading environmentally friendly policies and practices related to food production and packaging (see “History and current initiatives”below). The ambitions are leading compared to peers.

Second, both of these areas are world agriculture and food production powerhouses, with California the leading state in the USA, and the Netherlands the leading agriculture exporter in the European Union (15) (16). Thus, these two areas provide a rich ecosystem for our research efforts.

Both the Netherlands and California promote, or are starting to mandate, sustainable and circular packaging solutions for all industries including food.

Thus, by carrying out parallel studies in both areas, we can learn from each other when it comes to which factors are most and least important for realizing successful circular packaging solutions. Successful circular food packaging solutions require alignment and cooperation of numerous stakeholders, as discussed below. Solutions cannot be designed, implemented and rolled out in a vacuum.

 

Three drivers of circular food packaging

From our perspective, in Figure 2, we identify three issues that need further research to put out pilot projects related to circular food packaging in both countries.

The past few years, several organizations either surveyed or wrote about consumers’ behavior related to “sustainable” products or reusable packaging of branded products (including food) (17) (18). However, these surveys are not specific enough when it comes to identifying actual consumer behavior and needs of reusable food packaging solutions on a daily or weekly basis.

Further, retail grocery stores and foodservice providers will not facilitate most circular food packaging initiatives unless there is evidence of strong consumer buy-in over longer periods of time.

How can mid-sized food suppliers deliver circular packaging solutions?

Figure 2: Drivers of Circular Food Packaging

 

Even if consumers are willing to change their behavior relative to circular-friendly packaging, economically it needs to make sense for all parties involved in the supply chain. Economic gain is difficult to substantiate and is a topic widely research and written about. Understanding the value propositions of certain kinds of circular practices can be difficult for traditional investors and banks (19).

In the Netherlands, the three biggest banks launched guidelines in 2018 for creating a common framework for financing circular economy initiatives by industry (20). Thus, there is some movement by the financial community to address the economic viability of new initiatives. However, most likely most actual projects will have to be financed by individual companies in the value chains, with perhaps consumers having to pay more for their packaged food product(s) as well.

Lastly, we need to consider the closed-loop environment impact of any new circular packaging solutions. The solution may be wanted and acceptable to consumers, and it may be profitable for the delivery value chain, but the environmental impact also needs careful consideration.

The problem with life-cycle assessment (LCA) for our research is the lack of agreement on the proper frameworks to use in carrying out the analysis (21). There are numerous frameworks and tools like COMPASS for carrying out LCA. Any LCA needs to also consider food waste, and how the results can be communicated to consumers and members of the value chain to convince them to cooperate in new initiatives.

 

Current research focus and ambitions

Our research in the Netherlands and California will focus on the following four research topic in the next two years:

1. Consumers:

• Characterize consumer behavior/needs toward specific circular packaged food products in the Netherlands and California.

• Understand consumer attitudes towards reuse, co-use or refill offerings of specific foods.

 

2. Mid-sized Food Producers:

• Identify appropriate mid-sized food suppliers and their value chains that are ripe for moving forward with circular food packaging initiatives.

• Inventory the needs of mid-sized food producers with regard to circular economy ambitions.

• Determine operational needs and technical requirements from the food producer to consumer.

 

3. Retail Grocery / Foodservice Value Chains:

• Characterize economic needs and costs from the retail perspective.

• Inventory needs of downstream members of value chain concerning distribution and reverse logistics issues related to reuse, refill, co-use, re-appropriate or recycling.

 

4. LCA, Economics and Pilot Project(s):

• Propose a circular model for one or more food products in California and the Netherlands (including economics, costs, investments needed, life cycle assessment).

• Establish a consortium of companies in the Netherlands and California willing to carry out a pilot project for the circular model proposed.

• Measure consumer behavior to the new circularly packaged food compared to non-circularly packaged food.

• Characterize and pursue additional sources of funding for implementing the pilot project for the consortium of companies.

• Learn from comparisons and contrasts between the Netherlands and California.

We intend to publish the results of research topics one to three in the first half of 2020 in  Packaging Digest. Depending upon consumer cooperation, we intend to further publish the results of our field trials at the end of 2020.  

At this time, we are looking for mid-sized (fresh) food producers, retail grocery chains, logistics service providers, and packaging companies in California and Northwest Europe to join our research and pilot project efforts in 2020. Interested companies in these areas can contact us via this form

____________________________________________________________________________________________

How can mid-sized food suppliers deliver circular packaging solutions?  WestPack 2020: Ideas. Education. New Partners. Feb. 11-13

____________________________________________________________________________________________

History and current initiatives

In past centuries, most products were recycled or reused, as there was perpetual scarcity of food and packaging materials (5). Thus, recycling focused beyond metal, paperboard and glass, to include porcelain/clay jars, cotton bags and wooden boxes amongst other packaging materials.

Over the past 100 years, in most countries of the world, food scarcity subsided, and efficient industrial production created mass-produced raw materials and packages for food production and distribution. During the 20th century, plastic packaging was also introduced into the food supply chain. The net result of this has been less food waste, more consumer choice and convenience, longer supply chains, and much lower prices for food.

As packaging pollution increases worldwide, numerous government and non-profit organizations are implementing laws and initiatives to turn the tide against simple linear production of food. Recent Extended Product Responsibility (ERP) policies extend a manufacturer’s responsibility for reducing packaging impacts downstream, when consumers are done with them (22) (23). Over the past 30 years, more than 300 ERP laws have been passed and implemented in both the European Union and in the USA, with a good overview provided by CalRecycle (24) and OECD (25). Of these laws, only 17% of them are related to actual packaging.

The OECD reports that in the European Union recycling rates of packaging vary between 29% and 84% in 2014, with a target of 55% for all plastic waste by 2025. In 2016, in the European Union, recycling of plastic packaging reached a level of 40.8% and, for the first time, recycling rates exceeded energy recovery and landfill rates (26). Collection of plastic packaging in the Netherlands is higher, close to 50% in 2019 (27), but unfortunately only 35% of the collected waste ends up being recycled into new plastic, resulting in a yield of only 17%.

There are several reasons for such a low yield, which are beyond the scope of this article. But some of the main limitations behind using recycled plastics for food are:

• Food safety requirements for recycled plastics used for food (28) (29).

• Competition in undifferentiated markets for recycled plastic versus virgin plastics (30).

• Many new virgin plastics production plants coming online driven by cheap natural gas prices, resulting in cheap virgin materials (31).

Now let’s look at specific initiative and activities in California and the Netherlands.

Recently, in California, a new Senate Bill (SB-54) called California Circular Economy and Plastic Pollution Reduction Act is going through committee processes (32). The goal of this law is to achieve 75% recycling rates by 2030, and to reduce single-use packaging by 75%. Currently, in California less than 9% of plastic is recycled.

Historically, California has depended on exporting plastics and paper packaging streams to China and other countries—which is no longer possible. It’s noteworthy that about 75 organizations in and outside the state support the new bill, while seven major organizations—including the Grocery Manufacturers Assn., Plastics Industry Assn. and Household and Commercial Products Assn.—oppose the new bill.

A longer campaign has existed to educate California consumers and small- and medium-sized businesses about reusables for food products and food production. The Use Reusables campaign is a joint project of Alameda County (CA) public agency  and the Reusable Packaging Assn. (RPA). Launched in 2007, the campaign’s goal is to help businesses and institutions assess and optimize the transport packaging materials and systems they use, either within their manufacturing process or for product distribution (33). Thus far, the focus has been on totes, crates, intermediate bulk containers and reusable strapping to secure bundled bulk pallets of products in business-to-business (B2B) closed-loop deliveries.

In the Netherlands, the government launched the program A Circular Economy in the Netherlands by 2050 in September 2016. In this program, a nationwide plan is drawn up by multiple ministries to function as a vision for the successful implementation of the circular economy. The goal formulated in this report is to reduce the amount of primary resources used in the Netherlands by 50% in 2030, and to become completely circular by 2050 (34). In addition, the government facilitated the creation and support of the website Holland Circular Hotspot. It is a private public platform in which companies, knowledge institutes and (local) authorities collaborate internationally to exchange knowledge and stimulate entrepreneurship in the field of circular economy (35).

In 2014, as part of the Dutch government’s efforts to ramp up extended producer responsibility of packaging, the “Packaging Waste Fund” was established by producers and importers. This fund’s purpose is to collectively meet the extended producer responsibilities as stated in the national Packaging Decree and Packaging Agreement between industry and the government. It is a not-for-profit organization governed by a board of directors, who are themselves appointed by producers and importers (36).

Thus, as of 2018, all producers and importers of end-user consumer packaged products must pay levies into the waste fund, which vary between 2 and 78 euro-cents per kilogram (Note: B2B logistics packaging is not included) (37). Manufacturers packaging consumer products can qualify for lower levies if they agree to use a certain percentage of recycled content in their packages. Thus, economic incentives are being created to use recycled streams of materials. This organization reports that, in 2017, the Dutch recycled 87% of paper and paperboard, 86% glass, 95% metal, 73% wood and 50% plastic.

The Packaging Waste Fund resulted in the creation of the Netherlands Institute for Sustainable Packaging (KIDV), which is funded for 10 years at 2M euros per year by the fund. The KIDV employs a staff of 16 and acts as a national clearing house for developing, sharing and bringing knowledge together in the form of events, collaborative research, tools and expert advice (38). The KIDV is similar to the non-profit member-supported American Sustainable Packaging Coalition, which has been active since 2004.

A lot of the KIDV’s current activities focus on plastics, as the Netherlands already recycles a majority of non-plastics. For example, last July, they initiated a Community of Practice (CoP) with a consortium of companies facing similar challenges related to developing metallized flexible packaging that is suitable for the circular economy (39). The government decided that one of the five focus areas of its circular economy initiatives should focus on plastics.

In private industry, in February 2019, Dutch Grocery Store Organization made up of 24 corporate members agreed to reducing all packaging in their retail stores by 20% by 2025 (40). Initial efforts will focus on fruits and vegetables and on increasing recycled content of packaging. Another organization, MVO (Dutch Foundation for Socially Responsible Entrepreneurship) is also working on facilitating circular economy projects and matchmaking between companies. Their Future Proof Community website has more than 3,500 companies and acts as a matchmaker for companies that put out sustainable or circular challenges and companies suggesting solutions (41).

    

 

REFERENCES

1. Kidd, Charles V. The evolution of sustainability. J Agric Environ Ethics, Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1992. Vol. 1.

2. Lingle, Rick. Packaging Digest, Jul. 15, 2019. Sustainability drives the top five in food and beverage packaging.

3. International Trade Centre. Sustainability Map. All processed foods in Europe and North America.

4. Jouni Korhonena, Cali Nuurb, Andreas Feldmann, Seyoum Eshetu Birkiea. Circular economy as an essentially contested concept. Journal of Cleaner Production, Elsivier, Feb. 25, 2018. Vol. 175.

5. Trentmann, Frank. Empire of Things. Penquin Random House UK Books, 2016, pp. 624-654.

6. Bjorn de Koeijer, Renee Wever, Jorg Henseler. Realizing Product-Packaging Combinations in Circular Systems: Shaping the Research Agenda. 2017, Vol. 30.

7. Katz, Cheryl. Piling Up: How China’s Ban on Importing Waste Has Stalled Global Recycling. Yale University, Yale School of Forrestry & Environmental Studies, Mar. 7, 2019.

8. Erin McCormick, Charlotte Simmonds, Jessica Glenza, Katharine Gammon. Americans’ plastic recycling is dumped in landfills, investigation shows. The Guardian. Jun. 21, 2019.

9. Makower, Joel. Loop’s launch brings reusable packaging to the world’s biggest brands. GreenBiz Group, Jan. 24, 2019.

10. Devenyns, Jessi. Why reuseable food packaging has a promising future. FoodDive, Jun. 25, 2019.

11. Szaky, Tom. The Future of Packaging. Oakland: Berrett-Koehler Publishsers Inc., 2019.

12. Kramer, Anna. These 10 companies make a lot of the food we buy. Here’s how we made them better. Oxfam. [Online] Dec. 10, 2014. [Cited: Jul. 25, 2019.] https://www.oxfamamerica.org/explore/stories/these-10-companies-make-a-lot-of-the-food-we-buy-heres-how-we-made-them-better/.

13. Reusable Packaging Assn. A cost comparison model for reusable transport packaging. 102, June 2016.

14. Studies and Report. Reusable Industrial Packaging Assn. [Online] Aug. 18, 2019. [Cited: Aug. 18, 2019.] https://www.reusablepackaging.org/studies-and-reports/.

15. National Geographic. Tiny Country Feeds the World. September 2017.

16. California Department of Food and Agriculture. California Agricultural Production Statistics. 2017.

17. Wharton University of Pennsylvania. Reusable Packaging from Big Brands: Will Consumers Buy In? Wharton Business School, Knowledge@Wharton, Feb. 12, 2019.

18. Nielson. Consumer-Goods’ Brands That Demonstrate Commitment To Sustainability Outperform Those That Don’t. [Webpage]. Oct. 12, 2015.

19. Judith Kas, Bram Bet & Daphne Truijens. Barriers and Best Practices for the Circular Economy. SMO Promovendi. Circular Minds 2017-2018.

20. Rabobank Nederland. ABN AMRO, ING and Rabobank launch finance guidelines for circular economy. Rabobank Nederland Press Releases. [Online] Jul. 9, 2018. [Cited: Aug. 25, 2019.] https://www.rabobank.com/en/press/search/2018/20180702-abn-amro-ing-and-rabobank-launch-finance-guidelines-for-circular-economy.html.

21. Erik Pauer*, Bernhard Wohner, Victoria Heinrich and Manfred Tacker.Assessing the Environmental Sustainability of Food Packaging: An Extended Life Cycle Assessment including Packaging-Related Food Losses and Waste and Circularity Assessment. Basel: MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland, 11 2019, Sustainability, p. 925. Section of Packaging Technology and Resource Management, University of Applied Science, 1030 Vienna.

22. European Union. Closing the loop: Commission adopts ambitious new Circular Economy Package to boost competitiveness, create jobs and generate sustainable growth. Brussels: European Union, Dec. 2, 2015.

23. California Product Stewardship Counsel. California ERP Legislation. https://www.calpsc.org/.[Online] Aug. 13, 2019. [Cited: Aug. 13, 2019.] https://www.calpsc.org/legislation.

24. CalRecycle California Goverment. California Recylce Policy and Law. [Online] Jul. 19, 2019. [Cited: Aug. 13, 2019.] https://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/epr/policylaw.

25. OECD. OECD (2016), Extended Producer Responsibility: Updated Guidance for Efficient Waste Management, OECD Publishing, Paris. [Online] Sept. 16, 2016. [Cited: Aug. 13, 2019.] https://www.oecd-ilibrary.org/sites/9789264256385-4-en/index.html?itemId=/content/component/9789264256385-4-en.

26. PlasticsEurope Assn. of Plastics Manufacturers. Plastics the Facts 2017. European Assn. of Plastics Manufacturers, 2018.

27. Berenschot, Joost Krebbekx and Gijs Duivenvoorde – and Innovation, Siem Haffmans – Partners for. Roadmap towards increasing the sustainability of plastics packaging. NRK Verpakkingen, 2018. p. 74.

28. European Food Safety Authority. Plastics and Plastics Recycling. [Online] [Cited: Aug. 24, 2019.] https://www.efsa.europa.eu/en/topics/topic/plastics-and-plastic-recycling.

29. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Recycled Plastics in Food Packaging. [Online] Mar. 21, 2018. [Cited: Aug. 24, 2019.] https://www.fda.gov/food/packaging-food-contact-substances-fcs/recycled-plastics-food-packaging.

30. OECD. Improving Markets for Recycled Plastics: Trends, Prospects and Policy Responses,. Paris : OECD, 2018.

31. Project, The Climate Reality, [prod.]. Ethane Cracker Plants What Are They. Washington D.C.: The Climate Reality Project, Oct. 23, 2018.

32. Senators Allen, Skinner, Stern and Wiener. SB-54 California Circular Economy and Plastics Pollution Reduction Act. [leginfo.legislature.ca.gov]. Sacramento, California, USA : California State Legislature, Aug. 14, 2019.

33. Reusables Organization About Page. Usereusables Organization. [Online] [Cited: Aug. 18, 2019.] http://usereusables.org/about-reusables.

34. Dutch Ministry of Infrastructure and the Environment and the Ministry of Economic Affairs. The Circular Economy. Den Haag: September 2016.

35. TNO. Holland Circular Hotspot Home Page. Holland Circular Hotspot. [Online] 2019. [Cited: Aug. 21, 2019.] https://hollandcircularhotspot.nl/en/.

36. Dutch Packaging Waste Fund Home Page. Afvalfondsverpakkingen.nl. [Online] 2019. https://afvalfondsverpakkingen.nl/en/packaging-waste-fund.

37. Policy Afvalfonds Verpakkingen (Packaging Waste Fund). Afvalfondsverpakkingen.nl. [Online] Dec. 20, 2018. [Cited: Aug. 21, 2019.] https://afvalfondsverpakkingen.nl/a/i/Beleid-Overeenkomsten/Policy-2019.pdf.

38. KIDV. Organizational Structure. KIDV Netherlands Institute for Sustainable Packaging. [Online] [Cited: Aug. 21, 2019.] https://www.kidv.nl/228/over-het-kidv.html?ch=EN#organizational-structure.

39. Netherlands Institute for Sustainable Packaging (KIDV). Brand owners combine forces to address challenges to make flexible packaging circular. Jul. 16, 2019. Press Release.

40. Centraal Bureau Levensmiddelenhandel (CBL). 20% minder verpakkingen in de supermarkt in 2025. CBL Laaste Nieuws . [Online] Feb. 15, 2019. [Cited: Aug. 25, 2019.] https://www.cbl.nl/consumenten-hebben-weer-vertrouwen-in-de-supermarkt-2/.

41. MOV Nederland. Future Proof Community. Future Proof Community. [Online] Aug. 24, 2019. [Cited: Aug. 24, 2019.] https://futureproof.community/.

____________________________________________________________________________________________

How can mid-sized food suppliers deliver circular packaging solutions?Find your success! Subscribe to free Packaging Digest enewsletters.

 

[post_excerpt] => New research will analyze challenges and comparisons of companies in the Netherlands versus California, two hotbeds of environmental interest and responsibility.   People working in jobs related to producing, packaging, distributing and selling food products face increased sustainability demands. Such demands evolved over the past 50 years, starting in the 1970s (1). Current interest in […] [post_date_gmt] => 2019-11-15 16:14:31 [post_date] => 2019-11-15 16:14:31 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-11-15 16:14:31 [post_modified] => 2019-11-15 16:14:31 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2019/11/15/how-can-mid-sized-food-suppliers-deliver-circular-packaging-solutions/ [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Uncategorized – Converting Guide [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.convertingguide.com [syndication_source_id] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed_id] => 19 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2019/11/15/how-can-mid-sized-food-suppliers-deliver-circular-packaging-solutions/ [syndication_item_hash] => 75623eb20b8e8a68efeae7906a32db66 [faf_featured_image] => 0 [faf_process_image] => 0,0,0,0 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 10054 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

FAF deciding on filters on post to be syndicated:

Starview MRTS Manual Rotary Tray Sealer | ProPac.com

Array ( [post_title] => Starview MRTS Manual Rotary Tray Sealer | ProPac.com [post_content] =>

[post_date_gmt] => 2019-11-14 22:59:43 [post_date] => 2019-11-14 22:59:43 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-11-14 22:59:43 [post_modified] => 2019-11-14 22:59:43 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2019/11/14/starview-mrts-manual-rotary-tray-sealer-propac-com/ [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Uncategorized – Converting Guide [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.convertingguide.com [syndication_source_id] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed_id] => 19 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2019/11/14/starview-mrts-manual-rotary-tray-sealer-propac-com/ [syndication_item_hash] => f69da67055a5ac2f044cc6238fb02439 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 10054 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

Doing filter:faf_image_filter

Execute image filter

Image process

No image matches

Array ( )

Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Uncategorized – Converting Guide [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.convertingguide.com [syndication_source_id] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed_id] => 19 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2019/11/14/starview-mrts-manual-rotary-tray-sealer-propac-com/ [syndication_item_hash] => f69da67055a5ac2f044cc6238fb02439 )

Execute : Enclosure images

Enclosure save:

Array ( [0] => )

No match on

Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :Starview MRTS Manual Rotary Tray Sealer | ProPac.com

Array ( [post_title] => Starview MRTS Manual Rotary Tray Sealer | ProPac.com [post_content] =>

[post_date_gmt] => 2019-11-14 22:59:43 [post_date] => 2019-11-14 22:59:43 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-11-14 22:59:43 [post_modified] => 2019-11-14 22:59:43 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2019/11/14/starview-mrts-manual-rotary-tray-sealer-propac-com/ [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Uncategorized – Converting Guide [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.convertingguide.com [syndication_source_id] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed_id] => 19 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2019/11/14/starview-mrts-manual-rotary-tray-sealer-propac-com/ [syndication_item_hash] => f69da67055a5ac2f044cc6238fb02439 [faf_process_image] => ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 10054 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) [post_excerpt] => )

FAF deciding on filters on post to be syndicated:

Superhero water bottles flex recycling power

Array ( [post_title] => Superhero water bottles flex recycling power [post_content] =>

The packaging for Nestlé Pure Life’s new DC Collection offers four superhero-themed sleeve-labeled 330-mL bottles made from 100% rPET that are 100% recyclable including the sleeves and cap…and boast a special interactive ability.

 

Who says bottled water can’t be a super beverage? Not Nestlé Waters North America (NWNA), Stamford, CT, which adds sleeve labels featuring four different superheroes from the DC Comics universe to 330mL bottles of Nestlé Pure Life water.

The packaging for the new “DC Collection”, which is available in stores now, is also super from a sustainability standpoint—it’s 100% recyclable including bottles made of 100% recycled PET (rPET) along with the special recyclable shrink sleeve labels and caps.

“We’re excited to team up with Warner Bros. and DC to make drinking water more fun for families with kids,” says Yumi Clevenger-Lee, Chief Marketing Officer at Nestlé Waters North America. “By featuring characters kids look up to, along with a 100% recyclable bottle made with 100% recycled plastic, we’re doing our part to help keep both families and the planet healthy.”

“DC Super Heroes are among the most popular in the world and this new line of bottles is a great way to appeal to families with kids while reinforcing healthy choices,” adds Maryellen Zarakas, senior vice president, franchise management and marketing, Warner Bros. Consumer Products. “We are also teaching kids that every positive action towards creating change is what being a super hero is all about.”

Wonder Woman, our first featured superhero bottle, is a founding member of the Justice League, according to Wikipedia. The character first appeared in All Star Comics #8 in October 1941. The Wonder Woman title has been published by DC Comics almost continuously except for a brief hiatus in 1986.

You’ll find an individual superhero with additional information featured on the following three pages, including the next iconic figure who sports a packaging-enabling “superpower” found on all of bottles in the series that kids will enjoy—and that works at the speed of light.

Arguably the most iconic of all superheroes is Superman, who fights for “truth, justice and the American way.”  According to Wikipedia, Superman first appeared in Action Comics #1, a comic book published on April 18, 1938. While he wasn’t the first superhero, Superman remains the best-selling comic book superhero of all time.

The packaging’s positive vibe includes a fun Super Hero symbol on the side of the bottle that encourages kids to finish drinking their water and displays a unique capability: Once finished, kids can shine a flashlight through the bottle from a clear circular window printed on the sleeve label on the opposite side, which projects the mirror-image printed symbol properly on a nearby wall.

From a marketing view, the superhero series is intended to spark interest and generate sales. But there’s also a health benefit when that happens: Research shows that more than 50% of U.S. children between the ages of 6 and 19 are inadequately hydrated, which highlights the need for the consumption of more water.

An NWNA spokesperson shared this with Packaging Digest: “The Nestlé Pure Life DC Collection is a fun choice for every on-the-go occasion, from school lunches to summer road trips. It’s also a healthy alternative to sugary drinks with no calories and no sweeteners.

“DC Super Heroes are among the most popular in the world, and we hope these four characters, along with the Super Hero symbol on the side of the bottle, will help make drinking water more fun for families with kids.”

It’s not the first time the brand has enlisted familiar characters, in the past it has featured Emojis on 11.15oz bottles and SpongeBob Square pants on 8oz bottles.

Next: The bottles’ special recycling abilities

 

Shazam—an acronym of six “immortal elders” Solomon, Hercules, Atlas, Zeus, Achilles and Mercury—is a superhero with roots stretching back to 1939. Wikipedia states that he is the alter ego of Billy Batson, a boy who, by speaking the magic word “SHAZAM!”, can transform himself into a costumed adult with the powers of superhuman strength, speed, flight and other abilities.

The packaging has a very special ability, too: Not only is it 100% recyclable, it’s the first time the brand owner is using this sleeve label technology.  

An NWNA spokesperson discloses these additional details: “The shrink label is does not use an adhesive, instead uses various compatible polymers that work well in the recycling process. We invested in new equipment that applies these specific labels, further demonstrating the pride taken in carefully designing our bottles—down to the label—to be 100% recyclable so they can retain their quality and be turned back into new bottles. We are working with a number of strategic suppliers as we continue to explore alternative packaging options to virgin PET plastic.”

Notably and unlike some other sleeve-wrapped products, this new sleeve label technology does not require consumers to remove the label before recycling; consumers can simply place the cap back on the bottle when finished and discard in the recycling bin.

Packaging Digest speculates that the recyclable sleeve may be based on Eastman’s Embrace Encore copolyester due to the resin’s similar properties, but that could not be confirmed.

Next: The World’s Greatest Detective and final details

 

The fourth superhero for the launch is Batman, who debuted in 1939. Originally named the Bat-Man, the character is also referred to by such epithets as the Caped Crusader, the Dark Knight and the World’s Greatest Detective, according to Wikipedia.

That last moniker is quite a boast, though I suppose with Sherlock Holmes likely dead by this time…

NWNA makes quite a claim of its own: That the launch of the DC Collection, along with the introduction of 900mL bottles of Poland Spring Origin in April and Nestlé Pure Life 700mL bottles, has three of the only major nationally distributed bottled water offerings on the market to be made using 100% recycled plastic. It was last year that it promised to achieve 25% recycled plastic across its U.S. domestic portfolio by 2021. The company plans to continue expanding its use of recycled materials in the coming years, further setting an ambition to reach 50% recycled plastic by 2025.

The Nestlé Pure Life DC Collection is available nationwide through e-commerce sites Amazon.com, Boxed.com, and Walmart.com and. In addition, retail stores such as Albertsons, Fresh Direct, HEB, Meijer, Stop & Shop, and 7-Eleven will carry the bottles. The suggested retail price for a six-pack of 330mL/11.15oz rPET bottles is $3.29.

[post_excerpt] => The packaging for Nestlé Pure Life’s new DC Collection offers four superhero-themed sleeve-labeled 330-mL bottles made from 100% rPET that are 100% recyclable including the sleeves and cap…and boast a special interactive ability.   Who says bottled water can’t be a super beverage? Not Nestlé Waters North America (NWNA), Stamford, CT, which adds sleeve labels […] [post_date_gmt] => 2019-11-14 21:29:21 [post_date] => 2019-11-14 21:29:21 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-11-14 21:29:21 [post_modified] => 2019-11-14 21:29:21 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2019/11/14/superhero-water-bottles-flex-recycling-power/ [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Uncategorized – Converting Guide [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.convertingguide.com [syndication_source_id] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed_id] => 19 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2019/11/14/superhero-water-bottles-flex-recycling-power/ [syndication_item_hash] => b6e28fe610b33b6d9b99face34326a94 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 10054 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

Doing filter:faf_image_filter

Execute image filter

Image process

Local save:https://www.convertingguide.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/www.packagingdigest.com2-Superman-Bottles-Front-de3d13b9932883a858fcabc210f02d5dc199240b.jpg

Image process :: Saving local image

grab remote location : https://www.convertingguide.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/www.packagingdigest.com2-Superman-Bottles-Front-de3d13b9932883a858fcabc210f02d5dc199240b.jpg

Image exists, checking for same file size

Replacing images : - ON

The packaging for Nestlé Pure Life’s new DC Collection offers four superhero-themed sleeve-labeled 330-mL bottles made from 100% rPET that are 100% recyclable including the sleeves and cap…and boast a special interactive ability.

 

Who says bottled water can’t be a super beverage? Not Nestlé Waters North America (NWNA), Stamford, CT, which adds sleeve labels featuring four different superheroes from the DC Comics universe to 330mL bottles of Nestlé Pure Life water.

The packaging for the new “DC Collection”, which is available in stores now, is also super from a sustainability standpoint—it’s 100% recyclable including bottles made of 100% recycled PET (rPET) along with the special recyclable shrink sleeve labels and caps.

“We’re excited to team up with Warner Bros. and DC to make drinking water more fun for families with kids,” says Yumi Clevenger-Lee, Chief Marketing Officer at Nestlé Waters North America. “By featuring characters kids look up to, along with a 100% recyclable bottle made with 100% recycled plastic, we’re doing our part to help keep both families and the planet healthy.”

“DC Super Heroes are among the most popular in the world and this new line of bottles is a great way to appeal to families with kids while reinforcing healthy choices,” adds Maryellen Zarakas, senior vice president, franchise management and marketing, Warner Bros. Consumer Products. “We are also teaching kids that every positive action towards creating change is what being a super hero is all about.”

Wonder Woman, our first featured superhero bottle, is a founding member of the Justice League, according to Wikipedia. The character first appeared in All Star Comics #8 in October 1941. The Wonder Woman title has been published by DC Comics almost continuously except for a brief hiatus in 1986.

You’ll find an individual superhero with additional information featured on the following three pages, including the next iconic figure who sports a packaging-enabling “superpower” found on all of bottles in the series that kids will enjoy—and that works at the speed of light.

Arguably the most iconic of all superheroes is Superman, who fights for “truth, justice and the American way.”  According to Wikipedia, Superman first appeared in Action Comics #1, a comic book published on April 18, 1938. While he wasn’t the first superhero, Superman remains the best-selling comic book superhero of all time.

The packaging’s positive vibe includes a fun Super Hero symbol on the side of the bottle that encourages kids to finish drinking their water and displays a unique capability: Once finished, kids can shine a flashlight through the bottle from a clear circular window printed on the sleeve label on the opposite side, which projects the mirror-image printed symbol properly on a nearby wall.

From a marketing view, the superhero series is intended to spark interest and generate sales. But there’s also a health benefit when that happens: Research shows that more than 50% of U.S. children between the ages of 6 and 19 are inadequately hydrated, which highlights the need for the consumption of more water.

An NWNA spokesperson shared this with Packaging Digest: “The Nestlé Pure Life DC Collection is a fun choice for every on-the-go occasion, from school lunches to summer road trips. It’s also a healthy alternative to sugary drinks with no calories and no sweeteners.

“DC Super Heroes are among the most popular in the world, and we hope these four characters, along with the Super Hero symbol on the side of the bottle, will help make drinking water more fun for families with kids.”

It’s not the first time the brand has enlisted familiar characters, in the past it has featured Emojis on 11.15oz bottles and SpongeBob Square pants on 8oz bottles.

Next: The bottles’ special recycling abilities

 

Shazam—an acronym of six “immortal elders” Solomon, Hercules, Atlas, Zeus, Achilles and Mercury—is a superhero with roots stretching back to 1939. Wikipedia states that he is the alter ego of Billy Batson, a boy who, by speaking the magic word “SHAZAM!”, can transform himself into a costumed adult with the powers of superhuman strength, speed, flight and other abilities.

The packaging has a very special ability, too: Not only is it 100% recyclable, it’s the first time the brand owner is using this sleeve label technology.  

An NWNA spokesperson discloses these additional details: “The shrink label is does not use an adhesive, instead uses various compatible polymers that work well in the recycling process. We invested in new equipment that applies these specific labels, further demonstrating the pride taken in carefully designing our bottles—down to the label—to be 100% recyclable so they can retain their quality and be turned back into new bottles. We are working with a number of strategic suppliers as we continue to explore alternative packaging options to virgin PET plastic.”

Notably and unlike some other sleeve-wrapped products, this new sleeve label technology does not require consumers to remove the label before recycling; consumers can simply place the cap back on the bottle when finished and discard in the recycling bin.

Packaging Digest speculates that the recyclable sleeve may be based on Eastman’s Embrace Encore copolyester due to the resin’s similar properties, but that could not be confirmed.

Next: The World’s Greatest Detective and final details

 

The fourth superhero for the launch is Batman, who debuted in 1939. Originally named the Bat-Man, the character is also referred to by such epithets as the Caped Crusader, the Dark Knight and the World’s Greatest Detective, according to Wikipedia.

That last moniker is quite a boast, though I suppose with Sherlock Holmes likely dead by this time…

NWNA makes quite a claim of its own: That the launch of the DC Collection, along with the introduction of 900mL bottles of Poland Spring Origin in April and Nestlé Pure Life 700mL bottles, has three of the only major nationally distributed bottled water offerings on the market to be made using 100% recycled plastic. It was last year that it promised to achieve 25% recycled plastic across its U.S. domestic portfolio by 2021. The company plans to continue expanding its use of recycled materials in the coming years, further setting an ambition to reach 50% recycled plastic by 2025.

The Nestlé Pure Life DC Collection is available nationwide through e-commerce sites Amazon.com, Boxed.com, and Walmart.com and. In addition, retail stores such as Albertsons, Fresh Direct, HEB, Meijer, Stop & Shop, and 7-Eleven will carry the bottles. The suggested retail price for a six-pack of 330mL/11.15oz rPET bottles is $3.29.

Local save:https://www.convertingguide.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/www.packagingdigest.com3-Nestle-Shazam-PD_0-b37fbe799c1a3be6f84eb14b59f949c1269ca757.jpg

Image process :: Saving local image

grab remote location : https://www.convertingguide.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/www.packagingdigest.com3-Nestle-Shazam-PD_0-b37fbe799c1a3be6f84eb14b59f949c1269ca757.jpg

Image exists, checking for same file size

Replacing images : - ON

The packaging for Nestlé Pure Life’s new DC Collection offers four superhero-themed sleeve-labeled 330-mL bottles made from 100% rPET that are 100% recyclable including the sleeves and cap…and boast a special interactive ability.

 

Who says bottled water can’t be a super beverage? Not Nestlé Waters North America (NWNA), Stamford, CT, which adds sleeve labels featuring four different superheroes from the DC Comics universe to 330mL bottles of Nestlé Pure Life water.

The packaging for the new “DC Collection”, which is available in stores now, is also super from a sustainability standpoint—it’s 100% recyclable including bottles made of 100% recycled PET (rPET) along with the special recyclable shrink sleeve labels and caps.

“We’re excited to team up with Warner Bros. and DC to make drinking water more fun for families with kids,” says Yumi Clevenger-Lee, Chief Marketing Officer at Nestlé Waters North America. “By featuring characters kids look up to, along with a 100% recyclable bottle made with 100% recycled plastic, we’re doing our part to help keep both families and the planet healthy.”

“DC Super Heroes are among the most popular in the world and this new line of bottles is a great way to appeal to families with kids while reinforcing healthy choices,” adds Maryellen Zarakas, senior vice president, franchise management and marketing, Warner Bros. Consumer Products. “We are also teaching kids that every positive action towards creating change is what being a super hero is all about.”

Wonder Woman, our first featured superhero bottle, is a founding member of the Justice League, according to Wikipedia. The character first appeared in All Star Comics #8 in October 1941. The Wonder Woman title has been published by DC Comics almost continuously except for a brief hiatus in 1986.

You’ll find an individual superhero with additional information featured on the following three pages, including the next iconic figure who sports a packaging-enabling “superpower” found on all of bottles in the series that kids will enjoy—and that works at the speed of light.

Superhero water bottles flex recycling power

Arguably the most iconic of all superheroes is Superman, who fights for “truth, justice and the American way.”  According to Wikipedia, Superman first appeared in Action Comics #1, a comic book published on April 18, 1938. While he wasn’t the first superhero, Superman remains the best-selling comic book superhero of all time.

The packaging’s positive vibe includes a fun Super Hero symbol on the side of the bottle that encourages kids to finish drinking their water and displays a unique capability: Once finished, kids can shine a flashlight through the bottle from a clear circular window printed on the sleeve label on the opposite side, which projects the mirror-image printed symbol properly on a nearby wall.

From a marketing view, the superhero series is intended to spark interest and generate sales. But there’s also a health benefit when that happens: Research shows that more than 50% of U.S. children between the ages of 6 and 19 are inadequately hydrated, which highlights the need for the consumption of more water.

An NWNA spokesperson shared this with Packaging Digest: “The Nestlé Pure Life DC Collection is a fun choice for every on-the-go occasion, from school lunches to summer road trips. It’s also a healthy alternative to sugary drinks with no calories and no sweeteners.

“DC Super Heroes are among the most popular in the world, and we hope these four characters, along with the Super Hero symbol on the side of the bottle, will help make drinking water more fun for families with kids.”

It’s not the first time the brand has enlisted familiar characters, in the past it has featured Emojis on 11.15oz bottles and SpongeBob Square pants on 8oz bottles.

Next: The bottles’ special recycling abilities

 

Shazam—an acronym of six “immortal elders” Solomon, Hercules, Atlas, Zeus, Achilles and Mercury—is a superhero with roots stretching back to 1939. Wikipedia states that he is the alter ego of Billy Batson, a boy who, by speaking the magic word “SHAZAM!”, can transform himself into a costumed adult with the powers of superhuman strength, speed, flight and other abilities.

The packaging has a very special ability, too: Not only is it 100% recyclable, it’s the first time the brand owner is using this sleeve label technology.  

An NWNA spokesperson discloses these additional details: “The shrink label is does not use an adhesive, instead uses various compatible polymers that work well in the recycling process. We invested in new equipment that applies these specific labels, further demonstrating the pride taken in carefully designing our bottles—down to the label—to be 100% recyclable so they can retain their quality and be turned back into new bottles. We are working with a number of strategic suppliers as we continue to explore alternative packaging options to virgin PET plastic.”

Notably and unlike some other sleeve-wrapped products, this new sleeve label technology does not require consumers to remove the label before recycling; consumers can simply place the cap back on the bottle when finished and discard in the recycling bin.

Packaging Digest speculates that the recyclable sleeve may be based on Eastman’s Embrace Encore copolyester due to the resin’s similar properties, but that could not be confirmed.

Next: The World’s Greatest Detective and final details

 

The fourth superhero for the launch is Batman, who debuted in 1939. Originally named the Bat-Man, the character is also referred to by such epithets as the Caped Crusader, the Dark Knight and the World’s Greatest Detective, according to Wikipedia.

That last moniker is quite a boast, though I suppose with Sherlock Holmes likely dead by this time…

NWNA makes quite a claim of its own: That the launch of the DC Collection, along with the introduction of 900mL bottles of Poland Spring Origin in April and Nestlé Pure Life 700mL bottles, has three of the only major nationally distributed bottled water offerings on the market to be made using 100% recycled plastic. It was last year that it promised to achieve 25% recycled plastic across its U.S. domestic portfolio by 2021. The company plans to continue expanding its use of recycled materials in the coming years, further setting an ambition to reach 50% recycled plastic by 2025.

The Nestlé Pure Life DC Collection is available nationwide through e-commerce sites Amazon.com, Boxed.com, and Walmart.com and. In addition, retail stores such as Albertsons, Fresh Direct, HEB, Meijer, Stop & Shop, and 7-Eleven will carry the bottles. The suggested retail price for a six-pack of 330mL/11.15oz rPET bottles is $3.29.

Local save:https://www.convertingguide.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/www.packagingdigest.com4-Nestle-Batman-PD-0b5b0ea8f89f11a0d8dbe1ee346ef9ff8d7daaa9.jpg

Image process :: Saving local image

grab remote location : https://www.convertingguide.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/www.packagingdigest.com4-Nestle-Batman-PD-0b5b0ea8f89f11a0d8dbe1ee346ef9ff8d7daaa9.jpg

Image exists, checking for same file size

Replacing images : - ON

The packaging for Nestlé Pure Life’s new DC Collection offers four superhero-themed sleeve-labeled 330-mL bottles made from 100% rPET that are 100% recyclable including the sleeves and cap…and boast a special interactive ability.

 

Who says bottled water can’t be a super beverage? Not Nestlé Waters North America (NWNA), Stamford, CT, which adds sleeve labels featuring four different superheroes from the DC Comics universe to 330mL bottles of Nestlé Pure Life water.

The packaging for the new “DC Collection”, which is available in stores now, is also super from a sustainability standpoint—it’s 100% recyclable including bottles made of 100% recycled PET (rPET) along with the special recyclable shrink sleeve labels and caps.

“We’re excited to team up with Warner Bros. and DC to make drinking water more fun for families with kids,” says Yumi Clevenger-Lee, Chief Marketing Officer at Nestlé Waters North America. “By featuring characters kids look up to, along with a 100% recyclable bottle made with 100% recycled plastic, we’re doing our part to help keep both families and the planet healthy.”

“DC Super Heroes are among the most popular in the world and this new line of bottles is a great way to appeal to families with kids while reinforcing healthy choices,” adds Maryellen Zarakas, senior vice president, franchise management and marketing, Warner Bros. Consumer Products. “We are also teaching kids that every positive action towards creating change is what being a super hero is all about.”

Wonder Woman, our first featured superhero bottle, is a founding member of the Justice League, according to Wikipedia. The character first appeared in All Star Comics #8 in October 1941. The Wonder Woman title has been published by DC Comics almost continuously except for a brief hiatus in 1986.

You’ll find an individual superhero with additional information featured on the following three pages, including the next iconic figure who sports a packaging-enabling “superpower” found on all of bottles in the series that kids will enjoy—and that works at the speed of light.

Superhero water bottles flex recycling power

Arguably the most iconic of all superheroes is Superman, who fights for “truth, justice and the American way.”  According to Wikipedia, Superman first appeared in Action Comics #1, a comic book published on April 18, 1938. While he wasn’t the first superhero, Superman remains the best-selling comic book superhero of all time.

The packaging’s positive vibe includes a fun Super Hero symbol on the side of the bottle that encourages kids to finish drinking their water and displays a unique capability: Once finished, kids can shine a flashlight through the bottle from a clear circular window printed on the sleeve label on the opposite side, which projects the mirror-image printed symbol properly on a nearby wall.

From a marketing view, the superhero series is intended to spark interest and generate sales. But there’s also a health benefit when that happens: Research shows that more than 50% of U.S. children between the ages of 6 and 19 are inadequately hydrated, which highlights the need for the consumption of more water.

An NWNA spokesperson shared this with Packaging Digest: “The Nestlé Pure Life DC Collection is a fun choice for every on-the-go occasion, from school lunches to summer road trips. It’s also a healthy alternative to sugary drinks with no calories and no sweeteners.

“DC Super Heroes are among the most popular in the world, and we hope these four characters, along with the Super Hero symbol on the side of the bottle, will help make drinking water more fun for families with kids.”

It’s not the first time the brand has enlisted familiar characters, in the past it has featured Emojis on 11.15oz bottles and SpongeBob Square pants on 8oz bottles.

Next: The bottles’ special recycling abilities

 Superhero water bottles flex recycling power

Shazam—an acronym of six “immortal elders” Solomon, Hercules, Atlas, Zeus, Achilles and Mercury—is a superhero with roots stretching back to 1939. Wikipedia states that he is the alter ego of Billy Batson, a boy who, by speaking the magic word “SHAZAM!”, can transform himself into a costumed adult with the powers of superhuman strength, speed, flight and other abilities.

The packaging has a very special ability, too: Not only is it 100% recyclable, it’s the first time the brand owner is using this sleeve label technology.  

An NWNA spokesperson discloses these additional details: “The shrink label is does not use an adhesive, instead uses various compatible polymers that work well in the recycling process. We invested in new equipment that applies these specific labels, further demonstrating the pride taken in carefully designing our bottles—down to the label—to be 100% recyclable so they can retain their quality and be turned back into new bottles. We are working with a number of strategic suppliers as we continue to explore alternative packaging options to virgin PET plastic.”

Notably and unlike some other sleeve-wrapped products, this new sleeve label technology does not require consumers to remove the label before recycling; consumers can simply place the cap back on the bottle when finished and discard in the recycling bin.

Packaging Digest speculates that the recyclable sleeve may be based on Eastman’s Embrace Encore copolyester due to the resin’s similar properties, but that could not be confirmed.

Next: The World’s Greatest Detective and final details

 

The fourth superhero for the launch is Batman, who debuted in 1939. Originally named the Bat-Man, the character is also referred to by such epithets as the Caped Crusader, the Dark Knight and the World’s Greatest Detective, according to Wikipedia.

That last moniker is quite a boast, though I suppose with Sherlock Holmes likely dead by this time…

NWNA makes quite a claim of its own: That the launch of the DC Collection, along with the introduction of 900mL bottles of Poland Spring Origin in April and Nestlé Pure Life 700mL bottles, has three of the only major nationally distributed bottled water offerings on the market to be made using 100% recycled plastic. It was last year that it promised to achieve 25% recycled plastic across its U.S. domestic portfolio by 2021. The company plans to continue expanding its use of recycled materials in the coming years, further setting an ambition to reach 50% recycled plastic by 2025.

The Nestlé Pure Life DC Collection is available nationwide through e-commerce sites Amazon.com, Boxed.com, and Walmart.com and. In addition, retail stores such as Albertsons, Fresh Direct, HEB, Meijer, Stop & Shop, and 7-Eleven will carry the bottles. The suggested retail price for a six-pack of 330mL/11.15oz rPET bottles is $3.29.

Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Uncategorized – Converting Guide [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.convertingguide.com [syndication_source_id] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed_id] => 19 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2019/11/14/superhero-water-bottles-flex-recycling-power/ [syndication_item_hash] => b6e28fe610b33b6d9b99face34326a94 )

Execute : Enclosure images

Enclosure save:

Array ( [0] => )

No match on

Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :Superhero water bottles flex recycling power

Array ( [post_title] => Superhero water bottles flex recycling power [post_content] =>

The packaging for Nestlé Pure Life’s new DC Collection offers four superhero-themed sleeve-labeled 330-mL bottles made from 100% rPET that are 100% recyclable including the sleeves and cap…and boast a special interactive ability.

 

Who says bottled water can’t be a super beverage? Not Nestlé Waters North America (NWNA), Stamford, CT, which adds sleeve labels featuring four different superheroes from the DC Comics universe to 330mL bottles of Nestlé Pure Life water.

The packaging for the new “DC Collection”, which is available in stores now, is also super from a sustainability standpoint—it’s 100% recyclable including bottles made of 100% recycled PET (rPET) along with the special recyclable shrink sleeve labels and caps.

“We’re excited to team up with Warner Bros. and DC to make drinking water more fun for families with kids,” says Yumi Clevenger-Lee, Chief Marketing Officer at Nestlé Waters North America. “By featuring characters kids look up to, along with a 100% recyclable bottle made with 100% recycled plastic, we’re doing our part to help keep both families and the planet healthy.”

“DC Super Heroes are among the most popular in the world and this new line of bottles is a great way to appeal to families with kids while reinforcing healthy choices,” adds Maryellen Zarakas, senior vice president, franchise management and marketing, Warner Bros. Consumer Products. “We are also teaching kids that every positive action towards creating change is what being a super hero is all about.”

Wonder Woman, our first featured superhero bottle, is a founding member of the Justice League, according to Wikipedia. The character first appeared in All Star Comics #8 in October 1941. The Wonder Woman title has been published by DC Comics almost continuously except for a brief hiatus in 1986.

You’ll find an individual superhero with additional information featured on the following three pages, including the next iconic figure who sports a packaging-enabling “superpower” found on all of bottles in the series that kids will enjoy—and that works at the speed of light.

Superhero water bottles flex recycling power

Arguably the most iconic of all superheroes is Superman, who fights for “truth, justice and the American way.”  According to Wikipedia, Superman first appeared in Action Comics #1, a comic book published on April 18, 1938. While he wasn’t the first superhero, Superman remains the best-selling comic book superhero of all time.

The packaging’s positive vibe includes a fun Super Hero symbol on the side of the bottle that encourages kids to finish drinking their water and displays a unique capability: Once finished, kids can shine a flashlight through the bottle from a clear circular window printed on the sleeve label on the opposite side, which projects the mirror-image printed symbol properly on a nearby wall.

From a marketing view, the superhero series is intended to spark interest and generate sales. But there’s also a health benefit when that happens: Research shows that more than 50% of U.S. children between the ages of 6 and 19 are inadequately hydrated, which highlights the need for the consumption of more water.

An NWNA spokesperson shared this with Packaging Digest: “The Nestlé Pure Life DC Collection is a fun choice for every on-the-go occasion, from school lunches to summer road trips. It’s also a healthy alternative to sugary drinks with no calories and no sweeteners.

“DC Super Heroes are among the most popular in the world, and we hope these four characters, along with the Super Hero symbol on the side of the bottle, will help make drinking water more fun for families with kids.”

It’s not the first time the brand has enlisted familiar characters, in the past it has featured Emojis on 11.15oz bottles and SpongeBob Square pants on 8oz bottles.

Next: The bottles’ special recycling abilities

 Superhero water bottles flex recycling power

Shazam—an acronym of six “immortal elders” Solomon, Hercules, Atlas, Zeus, Achilles and Mercury—is a superhero with roots stretching back to 1939. Wikipedia states that he is the alter ego of Billy Batson, a boy who, by speaking the magic word “SHAZAM!”, can transform himself into a costumed adult with the powers of superhuman strength, speed, flight and other abilities.

The packaging has a very special ability, too: Not only is it 100% recyclable, it’s the first time the brand owner is using this sleeve label technology.  

An NWNA spokesperson discloses these additional details: “The shrink label is does not use an adhesive, instead uses various compatible polymers that work well in the recycling process. We invested in new equipment that applies these specific labels, further demonstrating the pride taken in carefully designing our bottles—down to the label—to be 100% recyclable so they can retain their quality and be turned back into new bottles. We are working with a number of strategic suppliers as we continue to explore alternative packaging options to virgin PET plastic.”

Notably and unlike some other sleeve-wrapped products, this new sleeve label technology does not require consumers to remove the label before recycling; consumers can simply place the cap back on the bottle when finished and discard in the recycling bin.

Packaging Digest speculates that the recyclable sleeve may be based on Eastman’s Embrace Encore copolyester due to the resin’s similar properties, but that could not be confirmed.

Next: The World’s Greatest Detective and final details

 Superhero water bottles flex recycling power

The fourth superhero for the launch is Batman, who debuted in 1939. Originally named the Bat-Man, the character is also referred to by such epithets as the Caped Crusader, the Dark Knight and the World’s Greatest Detective, according to Wikipedia.

That last moniker is quite a boast, though I suppose with Sherlock Holmes likely dead by this time…

NWNA makes quite a claim of its own: That the launch of the DC Collection, along with the introduction of 900mL bottles of Poland Spring Origin in April and Nestlé Pure Life 700mL bottles, has three of the only major nationally distributed bottled water offerings on the market to be made using 100% recycled plastic. It was last year that it promised to achieve 25% recycled plastic across its U.S. domestic portfolio by 2021. The company plans to continue expanding its use of recycled materials in the coming years, further setting an ambition to reach 50% recycled plastic by 2025.

The Nestlé Pure Life DC Collection is available nationwide through e-commerce sites Amazon.com, Boxed.com, and Walmart.com and. In addition, retail stores such as Albertsons, Fresh Direct, HEB, Meijer, Stop & Shop, and 7-Eleven will carry the bottles. The suggested retail price for a six-pack of 330mL/11.15oz rPET bottles is $3.29.

[post_excerpt] => The packaging for Nestlé Pure Life’s new DC Collection offers four superhero-themed sleeve-labeled 330-mL bottles made from 100% rPET that are 100% recyclable including the sleeves and cap…and boast a special interactive ability.   Who says bottled water can’t be a super beverage? Not Nestlé Waters North America (NWNA), Stamford, CT, which adds sleeve labels […] [post_date_gmt] => 2019-11-14 21:29:21 [post_date] => 2019-11-14 21:29:21 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-11-14 21:29:21 [post_modified] => 2019-11-14 21:29:21 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2019/11/14/superhero-water-bottles-flex-recycling-power/ [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Uncategorized – Converting Guide [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.convertingguide.com [syndication_source_id] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed_id] => 19 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2019/11/14/superhero-water-bottles-flex-recycling-power/ [syndication_item_hash] => b6e28fe610b33b6d9b99face34326a94 [faf_featured_image] => 0 [faf_process_image] => 0,0,0 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 10054 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

FAF deciding on filters on post to be syndicated:

Consumers want non-plastic packaging options

Array ( [post_title] => Consumers want non-plastic packaging options [post_content] =>

As the anti-plastics movement steamrolls across the globe, many consumer packaged goods companies (CPGs) are shying away from plastic packaging. Are they leading or following consumers? Exclusive research reveals that consumers expect brand owners to voluntarily replace single-use plastic packaging with non-plastic alternatives.

But will consumers still want non-plastic packaging options once they learn more about packaging sustainability? That may be the burning question brand marketers need to answer as they set packaging sustainability goals.

Download your free copy of the 2019 Packaging Digest Consumer Survey on Plastic Packaging Sustainability report below. Packaging Digest conducted the research in partnership with consumer insights leader Toluna.

Key insights include:

• American consumers are deeply concerned about the impact of single-use plastic packaging on the environment. Almost a third (31%) of respondents say their concern about the eco impact of plastic packaging is as high as it can possibly be. And, on the scale of 0 to 10, 61% of consumers checked 8, 9 or 10. This implies they are hyper aware of the current climate surrounding plastic packaging.

• Two thirds of respondents say the situation with disposable plastic packaging is the worst it’s ever been, but consumers also don’t think it has peaked yet: 82% say it will continue to escalate.

• A whopping 89% of survey respondents have faith that recycling can have a positive impact on marine debris.

• Consumers are not as aware as industry professionals as to the struggling state of recycling in the U.S., ranking “Low recycling rates” second to last in a list of environmental concerns. Respondents to our industry study rank that second from the top. A slightly higher percentage of consumers say recycling in the U.S. is healthy than say it’s not: 45% chose “Vibrant and Strong” or “Moderately Healthy” versus 39% who say “Struggling” or “Poor.”

• Demand driven? Brand owners might say they use plastic packaging because that’s what consumers buy/want (perhaps for convenience or on-the-go consumption). But consumers don’t see the plastic packaging waste problem as much their fault, perhaps because they aren’t given a choice to buy products in a different package.

• 60% of consumer-respondents want non-plastic packaging options. But if brands do use plastic packaging, they should at least make sure it is recyclable, or made with post-consumer recycled (PCR) content or bioplastics.

• Overall, less than a third say they support bans, but Millennials have more faith in government intervention as a solution than other age groups. And people in the U.S. West see regulations as more effective than their fellow citizens, especially those in the landlocked Midwest.

• Despite how they might feel about bans personally, 85% of respondents say we might or will see more regulations against plastic packaging.

• 83% of respondents believe non-plastic packaging is more eco-friendly.

• The silver lining: Consumers are clearly willing to act in (mostly) positive ways. More than a third say they are learning more about plastic packaging sustainability.

This sweeping 52-page consumer survey is companion research to Packaging Digest’s 2018 Sustainable Packaging Study—also free to download—that polled packaging professionals on many of the same questions about the sustainability of plastic packaging. An entire section of this consumer report analyzes the discrepancies between what consumers and packaging professionals think about this critical concern.

Download your free copy of the 2019 Packaging Digest Consumer Survey on Plastic Packaging Sustainability report now!

 

[post_excerpt] => As the anti-plastics movement steamrolls across the globe, many consumer packaged goods companies (CPGs) are shying away from plastic packaging. Are they leading or following consumers? Exclusive research reveals that consumers expect brand owners to voluntarily replace single-use plastic packaging with non-plastic alternatives. But will consumers still want non-plastic packaging options once they learn more […] [post_date_gmt] => 2019-11-14 20:14:21 [post_date] => 2019-11-14 20:14:21 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-11-14 20:14:21 [post_modified] => 2019-11-14 20:14:21 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2019/11/14/consumers-want-non-plastic-packaging-options/ [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Uncategorized – Converting Guide [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.convertingguide.com [syndication_source_id] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed_id] => 19 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2019/11/14/consumers-want-non-plastic-packaging-options/ [syndication_item_hash] => 01d9c508716712d8759393f17e8651da ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 10054 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

Doing filter:faf_image_filter

Execute image filter

Image process

No image matches

Array ( )

Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Uncategorized – Converting Guide [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.convertingguide.com [syndication_source_id] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed_id] => 19 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2019/11/14/consumers-want-non-plastic-packaging-options/ [syndication_item_hash] => 01d9c508716712d8759393f17e8651da )

Execute : Enclosure images

Enclosure save:

Array ( [0] => )

No match on

Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :Consumers want non-plastic packaging options

Array ( [post_title] => Consumers want non-plastic packaging options [post_content] =>

As the anti-plastics movement steamrolls across the globe, many consumer packaged goods companies (CPGs) are shying away from plastic packaging. Are they leading or following consumers? Exclusive research reveals that consumers expect brand owners to voluntarily replace single-use plastic packaging with non-plastic alternatives.

But will consumers still want non-plastic packaging options once they learn more about packaging sustainability? That may be the burning question brand marketers need to answer as they set packaging sustainability goals.

Download your free copy of the 2019 Packaging Digest Consumer Survey on Plastic Packaging Sustainability report below. Packaging Digest conducted the research in partnership with consumer insights leader Toluna.

Key insights include:

• American consumers are deeply concerned about the impact of single-use plastic packaging on the environment. Almost a third (31%) of respondents say their concern about the eco impact of plastic packaging is as high as it can possibly be. And, on the scale of 0 to 10, 61% of consumers checked 8, 9 or 10. This implies they are hyper aware of the current climate surrounding plastic packaging.

• Two thirds of respondents say the situation with disposable plastic packaging is the worst it’s ever been, but consumers also don’t think it has peaked yet: 82% say it will continue to escalate.

• A whopping 89% of survey respondents have faith that recycling can have a positive impact on marine debris.

• Consumers are not as aware as industry professionals as to the struggling state of recycling in the U.S., ranking “Low recycling rates” second to last in a list of environmental concerns. Respondents to our industry study rank that second from the top. A slightly higher percentage of consumers say recycling in the U.S. is healthy than say it’s not: 45% chose “Vibrant and Strong” or “Moderately Healthy” versus 39% who say “Struggling” or “Poor.”

• Demand driven? Brand owners might say they use plastic packaging because that’s what consumers buy/want (perhaps for convenience or on-the-go consumption). But consumers don’t see the plastic packaging waste problem as much their fault, perhaps because they aren’t given a choice to buy products in a different package.

• 60% of consumer-respondents want non-plastic packaging options. But if brands do use plastic packaging, they should at least make sure it is recyclable, or made with post-consumer recycled (PCR) content or bioplastics.

• Overall, less than a third say they support bans, but Millennials have more faith in government intervention as a solution than other age groups. And people in the U.S. West see regulations as more effective than their fellow citizens, especially those in the landlocked Midwest.

• Despite how they might feel about bans personally, 85% of respondents say we might or will see more regulations against plastic packaging.

• 83% of respondents believe non-plastic packaging is more eco-friendly.

• The silver lining: Consumers are clearly willing to act in (mostly) positive ways. More than a third say they are learning more about plastic packaging sustainability.

This sweeping 52-page consumer survey is companion research to Packaging Digest’s 2018 Sustainable Packaging Study—also free to download—that polled packaging professionals on many of the same questions about the sustainability of plastic packaging. An entire section of this consumer report analyzes the discrepancies between what consumers and packaging professionals think about this critical concern.

Download your free copy of the 2019 Packaging Digest Consumer Survey on Plastic Packaging Sustainability report now!

 

[post_excerpt] => As the anti-plastics movement steamrolls across the globe, many consumer packaged goods companies (CPGs) are shying away from plastic packaging. Are they leading or following consumers? Exclusive research reveals that consumers expect brand owners to voluntarily replace single-use plastic packaging with non-plastic alternatives. But will consumers still want non-plastic packaging options once they learn more […] [post_date_gmt] => 2019-11-14 20:14:21 [post_date] => 2019-11-14 20:14:21 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-11-14 20:14:21 [post_modified] => 2019-11-14 20:14:21 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2019/11/14/consumers-want-non-plastic-packaging-options/ [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Uncategorized – Converting Guide [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.convertingguide.com [syndication_source_id] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed_id] => 19 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2019/11/14/consumers-want-non-plastic-packaging-options/ [syndication_item_hash] => 01d9c508716712d8759393f17e8651da [faf_process_image] => ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 10054 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

FAF deciding on filters on post to be syndicated:

SpanTech MicroSpan Transfer Conveyor | ProPac.com

Array ( [post_title] => SpanTech MicroSpan Transfer Conveyor | ProPac.com [post_content] =>

[post_date_gmt] => 2019-11-13 23:44:54 [post_date] => 2019-11-13 23:44:54 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-11-13 23:44:54 [post_modified] => 2019-11-13 23:44:54 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2019/11/13/spantech-microspan-transfer-conveyor-propac-com/ [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Uncategorized – Converting Guide [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.convertingguide.com [syndication_source_id] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed_id] => 19 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2019/11/13/spantech-microspan-transfer-conveyor-propac-com/ [syndication_item_hash] => 85c9626ad0c19ae22e978423f825a780 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 10054 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

Doing filter:faf_image_filter

Execute image filter

Image process

No image matches

Array ( )

Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Uncategorized – Converting Guide [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.convertingguide.com [syndication_source_id] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed_id] => 19 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2019/11/13/spantech-microspan-transfer-conveyor-propac-com/ [syndication_item_hash] => 85c9626ad0c19ae22e978423f825a780 )

Execute : Enclosure images

Enclosure save:

Array ( [0] => )

No match on

Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :SpanTech MicroSpan Transfer Conveyor | ProPac.com

Array ( [post_title] => SpanTech MicroSpan Transfer Conveyor | ProPac.com [post_content] =>

[post_date_gmt] => 2019-11-13 23:44:54 [post_date] => 2019-11-13 23:44:54 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-11-13 23:44:54 [post_modified] => 2019-11-13 23:44:54 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2019/11/13/spantech-microspan-transfer-conveyor-propac-com/ [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Uncategorized – Converting Guide [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.convertingguide.com [syndication_source_id] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed_id] => 19 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2019/11/13/spantech-microspan-transfer-conveyor-propac-com/ [syndication_item_hash] => 85c9626ad0c19ae22e978423f825a780 [faf_process_image] => ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 10054 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) [post_excerpt] => )

FAF deciding on filters on post to be syndicated:

SpanTech TranSorter Conveying System | ProPac.com

Array ( [post_title] => SpanTech TranSorter Conveying System | ProPac.com [post_content] =>

[post_date_gmt] => 2019-11-13 23:44:54 [post_date] => 2019-11-13 23:44:54 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-11-13 23:44:54 [post_modified] => 2019-11-13 23:44:54 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2019/11/13/spantech-transorter-conveying-system-propac-com/ [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Uncategorized – Converting Guide [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.convertingguide.com [syndication_source_id] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed_id] => 19 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2019/11/13/spantech-transorter-conveying-system-propac-com/ [syndication_item_hash] => f8012af1479a9746a555eb1111fda6b0 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 10054 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

Doing filter:faf_image_filter

Execute image filter

Image process

No image matches

Array ( )

Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Uncategorized – Converting Guide [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.convertingguide.com [syndication_source_id] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed_id] => 19 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2019/11/13/spantech-transorter-conveying-system-propac-com/ [syndication_item_hash] => f8012af1479a9746a555eb1111fda6b0 )

Execute : Enclosure images

Enclosure save:

Array ( [0] => )

No match on

Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :SpanTech TranSorter Conveying System | ProPac.com

Array ( [post_title] => SpanTech TranSorter Conveying System | ProPac.com [post_content] =>

[post_date_gmt] => 2019-11-13 23:44:54 [post_date] => 2019-11-13 23:44:54 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-11-13 23:44:54 [post_modified] => 2019-11-13 23:44:54 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2019/11/13/spantech-transorter-conveying-system-propac-com/ [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Uncategorized – Converting Guide [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.convertingguide.com [syndication_source_id] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed_id] => 19 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2019/11/13/spantech-transorter-conveying-system-propac-com/ [syndication_item_hash] => f8012af1479a9746a555eb1111fda6b0 [faf_process_image] => ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 10054 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) [post_excerpt] => )


Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /homepages/41/d79740523/htdocs/converternews/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/syndicatedlink.class.php on line 302

Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /homepages/41/d79740523/htdocs/converternews/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/syndicatedpost.class.php on line 708

Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /homepages/41/d79740523/htdocs/converternews/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/syndicatedpost.class.php on line 708

Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /homepages/41/d79740523/htdocs/converternews/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/syndicatedpost.class.php on line 708

Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /homepages/41/d79740523/htdocs/converternews/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/syndicatedpost.class.php on line 708

Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /homepages/41/d79740523/htdocs/converternews/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/syndicatedpost.class.php on line 708

Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /homepages/41/d79740523/htdocs/converternews/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/syndicatedpost.class.php on line 708

Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /homepages/41/d79740523/htdocs/converternews/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/syndicatedpost.class.php on line 708

Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /homepages/41/d79740523/htdocs/converternews/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/syndicatedpost.class.php on line 708

Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /homepages/41/d79740523/htdocs/converternews/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/syndicatedpost.class.php on line 708

Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /homepages/41/d79740523/htdocs/converternews/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/syndicatedpost.class.php on line 708

Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /homepages/41/d79740523/htdocs/converternews/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/syndicatedpost.class.php on line 708

Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /homepages/41/d79740523/htdocs/converternews/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/syndicatedpost.class.php on line 708

Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /homepages/41/d79740523/htdocs/converternews/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/syndicatedpost.class.php on line 708

Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /homepages/41/d79740523/htdocs/converternews/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/syndicatedpost.class.php on line 708

Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /homepages/41/d79740523/htdocs/converternews/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/syndicatedpost.class.php on line 708

Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /homepages/41/d79740523/htdocs/converternews/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/syndicatedpost.class.php on line 708

Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /homepages/41/d79740523/htdocs/converternews/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/syndicatedpost.class.php on line 708

Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /homepages/41/d79740523/htdocs/converternews/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/syndicatedpost.class.php on line 708

Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /homepages/41/d79740523/htdocs/converternews/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/syndicatedpost.class.php on line 708

Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /homepages/41/d79740523/htdocs/converternews/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/syndicatedpost.class.php on line 708

Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /homepages/41/d79740523/htdocs/converternews/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/syndicatedpost.class.php on line 708

Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /homepages/41/d79740523/htdocs/converternews/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/syndicatedpost.class.php on line 708

Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /homepages/41/d79740523/htdocs/converternews/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/syndicatedpost.class.php on line 708

Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /homepages/41/d79740523/htdocs/converternews/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/syndicatedpost.class.php on line 708

Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /homepages/41/d79740523/htdocs/converternews/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/syndicatedpost.class.php on line 708

Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /homepages/41/d79740523/htdocs/converternews/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/syndicatedpost.class.php on line 708

Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /homepages/41/d79740523/htdocs/converternews/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/syndicatedpost.class.php on line 708

Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /homepages/41/d79740523/htdocs/converternews/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/syndicatedpost.class.php on line 708

Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /homepages/41/d79740523/htdocs/converternews/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/syndicatedpost.class.php on line 708

Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /homepages/41/d79740523/htdocs/converternews/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/syndicatedpost.class.php on line 708

Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /homepages/41/d79740523/htdocs/converternews/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/syndicatedpost.class.php on line 708

Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /homepages/41/d79740523/htdocs/converternews/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/syndicatedpost.class.php on line 708

Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /homepages/41/d79740523/htdocs/converternews/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/syndicatedpost.class.php on line 708

Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /homepages/41/d79740523/htdocs/converternews/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/syndicatedpost.class.php on line 708

Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /homepages/41/d79740523/htdocs/converternews/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/syndicatedpost.class.php on line 708

Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /homepages/41/d79740523/htdocs/converternews/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/syndicatedpost.class.php on line 708

Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /homepages/41/d79740523/htdocs/converternews/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/syndicatedpost.class.php on line 708

Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /homepages/41/d79740523/htdocs/converternews/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/syndicatedpost.class.php on line 708

Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /homepages/41/d79740523/htdocs/converternews/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/syndicatedpost.class.php on line 708

Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /homepages/41/d79740523/htdocs/converternews/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/syndicatedpost.class.php on line 708

Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /homepages/41/d79740523/htdocs/converternews/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/syndicatedpost.class.php on line 708

Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /homepages/41/d79740523/htdocs/converternews/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/syndicatedpost.class.php on line 708

Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /homepages/41/d79740523/htdocs/converternews/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/syndicatedpost.class.php on line 708

Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /homepages/41/d79740523/htdocs/converternews/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/syndicatedpost.class.php on line 708

Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /homepages/41/d79740523/htdocs/converternews/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/syndicatedpost.class.php on line 708

Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /homepages/41/d79740523/htdocs/converternews/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/syndicatedpost.class.php on line 708

Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /homepages/41/d79740523/htdocs/converternews/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/syndicatedpost.class.php on line 708

Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /homepages/41/d79740523/htdocs/converternews/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/syndicatedpost.class.php on line 708

Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /homepages/41/d79740523/htdocs/converternews/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/syndicatedpost.class.php on line 708

Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /homepages/41/d79740523/htdocs/converternews/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/syndicatedpost.class.php on line 708

Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /homepages/41/d79740523/htdocs/converternews/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/syndicatedlink.class.php on line 302

Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /homepages/41/d79740523/htdocs/converternews/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/syndicatedlink.class.php on line 302

Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /homepages/41/d79740523/htdocs/converternews/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/syndicatedlink.class.php on line 302

1

Attach Id ( 194367 ) not integer for post_thumbnail 194085

1

Attach Id ( 196176 ) not integer for post_thumbnail 195688

1

Attach Id ( 197036 ) not integer for post_thumbnail 197000

1

Attach Id ( 199012 ) not integer for post_thumbnail 198936

1

Attach Id ( 228522 ) not integer for post_thumbnail 221129

1

Attach Id ( 234309 ) not integer for post_thumbnail 234297

1

Attach Id ( 253580 ) not integer for post_thumbnail 249228

1

Attach Id ( 276919 ) not integer for post_thumbnail 276406

1

Attach Id ( 276921 ) not integer for post_thumbnail 276421

1

Attach Id ( 276923 ) not integer for post_thumbnail 276424

1

Attach Id ( 276951 ) not integer for post_thumbnail 275971

1

Attach Id ( 276968 ) not integer for post_thumbnail 275977

1

Attach Id ( 276994 ) not integer for post_thumbnail 276427

1

Attach Id ( 276996 ) not integer for post_thumbnail 276430

1

Attach Id ( 277001 ) not integer for post_thumbnail 276465

1

Attach Id ( 277003 ) not integer for post_thumbnail 276468

1

Attach Id ( 277005 ) not integer for post_thumbnail 276306

1

Attach Id ( 277007 ) not integer for post_thumbnail 276471

1

Attach Id ( 277009 ) not integer for post_thumbnail 276474

1

Attach Id ( 277011 ) not integer for post_thumbnail 276477

1

Attach Id ( 277015 ) not integer for post_thumbnail 276136

1

Attach Id ( 379383 ) not integer for post_thumbnail 378342

1

Attach Id ( 379385 ) not integer for post_thumbnail 378345

1

Attach Id ( 379387 ) not integer for post_thumbnail 378348

1

Attach Id ( 386994 ) not integer for post_thumbnail 325003

1

Attach Id ( 389810 ) not integer for post_thumbnail 389701

1

Attach Id ( 407721 ) not integer for post_thumbnail 361336

1

Attach Id ( 408068 ) not integer for post_thumbnail 404376

1

Attach Id ( 408149 ) not integer for post_thumbnail 293296

1

Attach Id ( 408389 ) not integer for post_thumbnail 300814

1

Attach Id ( 408460 ) not integer for post_thumbnail 377163

1

Attach Id ( 409232 ) not integer for post_thumbnail 308600

1

Attach Id ( 412819 ) not integer for post_thumbnail 336808

1

Attach Id ( 413176 ) not integer for post_thumbnail 337034

1

Attach Id ( 419280 ) not integer for post_thumbnail 418246

Coca-Cola European Partners lists on main London Stock Exchange | Slitter, converting, labelling and hot melt news