FAF deciding on filters on post to be syndicated:

Smart Packaging Experts Talk Tech and Options

Array ( [post_title] => Smart Packaging Experts Talk Tech and Options [post_content] =>

Managers from vendor Jones Healthcare Group and consultancies Ahead of the Curve Group and TUKU provide a close-up look at IoT-connected packaging.

 

It turned out be a smart move on my part to attend several of the weekly webinars on packaging topics managed by PAC, Packaging Consortium. One of those hour-long sessions was on smart packaging, where webcast attendees gained up-to-date information, insights, and advice from those in the know. PAC Next consultant Andrew Mcdonald moderated the session that featured presenters…

 

Smart Packaging Levels 3, 4, and 5 are the most exciting.

Leadoff presenter Lee set the stage by defined smart packaging as going beyond traditional packaging that promotes and preserves with added features and capabilities. Lee shared the company’s internal scale of five levels of packaging (main image) going from non-bar-coded dumb boxes at Level 1 to Level 2 with a scannable bar code. Levels 3-5 include technologies such as radio-frequency identification (RFID) chips or tags or near-field communications (NFC) tech.

Levels 3 and 4 refer to smartphone-enabled units and the smartest, Level 5, Jones described as standalone packages that connect to the internet or mobile network without the need for a smartphone.

“Adding connectivity to a package makes it an Internet of Things device,” he pointed out.

According to study data Lee referenced, smartphones are growing virally; in 2015 less than 15% of smartphones offered NFC readability, today that number is close to 90%.

Because Jones operates in the healthcare space, regulatory requirements mandate that it provide 100% inspection of enabled packaging including read and verify quality checks of the smart tag.

Interestingly, the company is proficient at using conductive inks to print circuits directly onto paperboard and plastic substrates.

Current best practices keep the NFC tag hidden and protected inside the packaging. “That also saves valuable on-pack real estate,” he added.

Image courtesy Jones Healthcare Group.

The company’s in-market “CpaX” brand connected packaging is used in one application for monitoring consumers’ medicine compliance. For example, when a patient opens a blister pack to access a medication, a notification is sent to a caregiver.

 

NFC, dual-level QR codes, and blockchain.

“We’re a small company with big aspirations,” said Ahead of the Curve Group’s Cvetan, who has 20 years’ experience in packaging development working with brands and retailers.

The company’s smart applications are in three areas: Consumer experience, Product integrity, and Inventory and Lifecycle.

“Product integrity is increasingly important for consumer brands,” she noted.

Image courtesy Danone.

Cvetan singled out several exemplary applications in the market that included a dual-Quick Response (QR) code for traceability and authenticity for multiserve containers of Danone baby formula distributed in China. An exterior outer QR code provides consumer-engaging information and an inner one is used to establish blockchain-level security in a market fraught with counterfeit products.

Cvetan also pointed to another application for CBD cannabis products with similar goals that uses an NFC tag to create a unique, verifiable identification number for the package.

And she referenced one of the largest smart packaging programs to date, which was done by a major brand working with a major retailer. Packaging Digest reported on this case study of Kraft slice cheese at Walmart (image below) in True Shelf Life in Real Time: There’s an App for That, published March 2020.

Image courtesy TPG Rewards

Cvetan's company offers the proprietary TapScan platform. She informs Packaging Digest that it “provides brand owners the ability to control their message when and where it matters most, at the right time at the right place.” It is available for global executions.

 

The influence of COVID-19 and brand advice.

Mark Baldwin of contactless engagement specialist TUKU kicked off his presentation by noting that the effect of the coronavirus pandemic has been to “effect a decade of change in a few months.”

What should brands do? His advice: In the light of smart packaging they should adapt to survive and prosper by embracing brand control, digital, and data.

“Brands best avenue to do that is through connected packaging,” he said. And he said that brands…

Options and considerations in smart packaging, markets, and engagement. Image courtesy TUKU.

 

Q&A: Sustainability, privacy, and more.

The questions and responses at the end of the webinar were illuminating. Several attendees asked about packaging sustainability for some engagement technologies that may require devices or printed circuits.

“Carbon graphite [inks] are acceptable,” responded Jones’ Lee, “though we don’t know about nanomaterials. However, EAS packaging devices have been collected and recycled for years [without problems] so we don’t expect any risks associated with recovering these materials for recycling."

Brands can also leverage the technology itself via a targeted response to an inquiry about the package's recyclability. “Brands can communicate by location of engagement the local recycling guidelines,” offered Cvetan.

Also, the question of data collection and privacy came up. “Brands must adhere to all privacy requirements—they’re not tracking personal information…in that respect, it’s similar to a standard website interaction,” said Baldwin.

The need for collaboration was a common recommendation. “Open your company up to using partners, especially good ones,” said Cvetan.

What technology to use?

“The engagement method depends on the market, for example QR use is high in Asia, but not so much in North America,” said Lee.

Rather than pick one tech, best practice is to use both NFC tags and QR codes.

We close this report with this advice from Lee: “Don’t use the tech just to use it, use it to solve a business challenge.”

[post_excerpt] => Managers from vendor Jones Healthcare Group and consultancies Ahead of the Curve Group and TUKU provide a close-up look at IoT-connected packaging. It turned out be a smart move on my part to attend several of the weekly webinars on packaging topics ma... [post_date_gmt] => 2020-05-26 15:51:31 [post_date] => 2020-05-26 15:51:31 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-05-26 15:51:31 [post_modified] => 2020-05-26 15:51:31 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => 29443 at https://www.packagingdigest.com [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => https://www.packagingdigest.com/sites/default/files/PD-Danone Baby Formula Track Connect Service_Press Photo-White Background_Aptamil English.jpg image/jpeg ) [syndication_source] => Packaging Digest [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.packagingdigest.com [syndication_source_id] => http://www.packagingdigest.com/rss.xml [syndication_feed] => http://www.packagingdigest.com/rss.xml [syndication_feed_id] => 109 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.packagingdigest.com/smart-packaging/smart-packaging-experts-talk-tech-options-2020-05-26 [syndication_item_hash] => a96870dd1e8ccd4f3a102fb852888d2c ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 8266 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

Doing filter:faf_image_filter

Execute image filter

Image process

Local save:https://www.packagingdigest.com/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_750x422/public/1-SmartPkg-Jones-Portfolio-PD_0.jpg?itok=_Thqt30R

Image process :: Saving local image

grab remote location : https://www.packagingdigest.com/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_750x422/public/1-SmartPkg-Jones-Portfolio-PD_0.jpg?itok=_Thqt30R

Image exists, checking for same file size

Replacing images : - ON

Managers from vendor Jones Healthcare Group and consultancies Ahead of the Curve Group and TUKU provide a close-up look at IoT-connected packaging.

 

It turned out be a smart move on my part to attend several of the weekly webinars on packaging topics managed by PAC, Packaging Consortium. One of those hour-long sessions was on smart packaging, where webcast attendees gained up-to-date information, insights, and advice from those in the know. PAC Next consultant Andrew Mcdonald moderated the session that featured presenters…

 

Smart Packaging Levels 3, 4, and 5 are the most exciting.

Leadoff presenter Lee set the stage by defined smart packaging as going beyond traditional packaging that promotes and preserves with added features and capabilities. Lee shared the company’s internal scale of five levels of packaging (main image) going from non-bar-coded dumb boxes at Level 1 to Level 2 with a scannable bar code. Levels 3-5 include technologies such as radio-frequency identification (RFID) chips or tags or near-field communications (NFC) tech.

Levels 3 and 4 refer to smartphone-enabled units and the smartest, Level 5, Jones described as standalone packages that connect to the internet or mobile network without the need for a smartphone.

“Adding connectivity to a package makes it an Internet of Things device,” he pointed out.

According to study data Lee referenced, smartphones are growing virally; in 2015 less than 15% of smartphones offered NFC readability, today that number is close to 90%.

Because Jones operates in the healthcare space, regulatory requirements mandate that it provide 100% inspection of enabled packaging including read and verify quality checks of the smart tag.

Interestingly, the company is proficient at using conductive inks to print circuits directly onto paperboard and plastic substrates.

Current best practices keep the NFC tag hidden and protected inside the packaging. “That also saves valuable on-pack real estate,” he added.

Image courtesy Jones Healthcare Group.

The company’s in-market “CpaX” brand connected packaging is used in one application for monitoring consumers’ medicine compliance. For example, when a patient opens a blister pack to access a medication, a notification is sent to a caregiver.

 

NFC, dual-level QR codes, and blockchain.

“We’re a small company with big aspirations,” said Ahead of the Curve Group’s Cvetan, who has 20 years’ experience in packaging development working with brands and retailers.

The company’s smart applications are in three areas: Consumer experience, Product integrity, and Inventory and Lifecycle.

“Product integrity is increasingly important for consumer brands,” she noted.

Image courtesy Danone.

Cvetan singled out several exemplary applications in the market that included a dual-Quick Response (QR) code for traceability and authenticity for multiserve containers of Danone baby formula distributed in China. An exterior outer QR code provides consumer-engaging information and an inner one is used to establish blockchain-level security in a market fraught with counterfeit products.

Cvetan also pointed to another application for CBD cannabis products with similar goals that uses an NFC tag to create a unique, verifiable identification number for the package.

And she referenced one of the largest smart packaging programs to date, which was done by a major brand working with a major retailer. Packaging Digest reported on this case study of Kraft slice cheese at Walmart (image below) in True Shelf Life in Real Time: There’s an App for That, published March 2020.

Image courtesy TPG Rewards

Cvetan's company offers the proprietary TapScan platform. She informs Packaging Digest that it “provides brand owners the ability to control their message when and where it matters most, at the right time at the right place.” It is available for global executions.

 

The influence of COVID-19 and brand advice.

Mark Baldwin of contactless engagement specialist TUKU kicked off his presentation by noting that the effect of the coronavirus pandemic has been to “effect a decade of change in a few months.”

What should brands do? His advice: In the light of smart packaging they should adapt to survive and prosper by embracing brand control, digital, and data.

“Brands best avenue to do that is through connected packaging,” he said. And he said that brands…

Options and considerations in smart packaging, markets, and engagement. Image courtesy TUKU.

 

Q&A: Sustainability, privacy, and more.

The questions and responses at the end of the webinar were illuminating. Several attendees asked about packaging sustainability for some engagement technologies that may require devices or printed circuits.

“Carbon graphite [inks] are acceptable,” responded Jones’ Lee, “though we don’t know about nanomaterials. However, EAS packaging devices have been collected and recycled for years [without problems] so we don’t expect any risks associated with recovering these materials for recycling."

Brands can also leverage the technology itself via a targeted response to an inquiry about the package's recyclability. “Brands can communicate by location of engagement the local recycling guidelines,” offered Cvetan.

Also, the question of data collection and privacy came up. “Brands must adhere to all privacy requirements—they’re not tracking personal information…in that respect, it’s similar to a standard website interaction,” said Baldwin.

The need for collaboration was a common recommendation. “Open your company up to using partners, especially good ones,” said Cvetan.

What technology to use?

“The engagement method depends on the market, for example QR use is high in Asia, but not so much in North America,” said Lee.

Rather than pick one tech, best practice is to use both NFC tags and QR codes.

We close this report with this advice from Lee: “Don’t use the tech just to use it, use it to solve a business challenge.”

Local save:https://www.packagingdigest.com/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_750x422/public/PD-Danone%20Baby%20Formula%20Track%20%20Connect%20Service_Press%20Photo-White%20Background_Aptamil%20English.jpg?itok=aaGmsdJY

Image process :: Saving local image

grab remote location : https://www.packagingdigest.com/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_750x422/public/PD-Danone%20Baby%20Formula%20Track%20%20Connect%20Service_Press%20Photo-White%20Background_Aptamil%20English.jpg?itok=aaGmsdJY

Image exists, checking for same file size

Replacing images : - ON

Managers from vendor Jones Healthcare Group and consultancies Ahead of the Curve Group and TUKU provide a close-up look at IoT-connected packaging.

 

It turned out be a smart move on my part to attend several of the weekly webinars on packaging topics managed by PAC, Packaging Consortium. One of those hour-long sessions was on smart packaging, where webcast attendees gained up-to-date information, insights, and advice from those in the know. PAC Next consultant Andrew Mcdonald moderated the session that featured presenters…

 

Smart Packaging Levels 3, 4, and 5 are the most exciting.

Leadoff presenter Lee set the stage by defined smart packaging as going beyond traditional packaging that promotes and preserves with added features and capabilities. Lee shared the company’s internal scale of five levels of packaging (main image) going from non-bar-coded dumb boxes at Level 1 to Level 2 with a scannable bar code. Levels 3-5 include technologies such as radio-frequency identification (RFID) chips or tags or near-field communications (NFC) tech.

Levels 3 and 4 refer to smartphone-enabled units and the smartest, Level 5, Jones described as standalone packages that connect to the internet or mobile network without the need for a smartphone.

“Adding connectivity to a package makes it an Internet of Things device,” he pointed out.

According to study data Lee referenced, smartphones are growing virally; in 2015 less than 15% of smartphones offered NFC readability, today that number is close to 90%.

Because Jones operates in the healthcare space, regulatory requirements mandate that it provide 100% inspection of enabled packaging including read and verify quality checks of the smart tag.

Interestingly, the company is proficient at using conductive inks to print circuits directly onto paperboard and plastic substrates.

Current best practices keep the NFC tag hidden and protected inside the packaging. “That also saves valuable on-pack real estate,” he added.

Smart Packaging Experts Talk Tech and Options

Image courtesy Jones Healthcare Group.

The company’s in-market “CpaX” brand connected packaging is used in one application for monitoring consumers’ medicine compliance. For example, when a patient opens a blister pack to access a medication, a notification is sent to a caregiver.

 

NFC, dual-level QR codes, and blockchain.

“We’re a small company with big aspirations,” said Ahead of the Curve Group’s Cvetan, who has 20 years’ experience in packaging development working with brands and retailers.

The company’s smart applications are in three areas: Consumer experience, Product integrity, and Inventory and Lifecycle.

“Product integrity is increasingly important for consumer brands,” she noted.

Image courtesy Danone.

Cvetan singled out several exemplary applications in the market that included a dual-Quick Response (QR) code for traceability and authenticity for multiserve containers of Danone baby formula distributed in China. An exterior outer QR code provides consumer-engaging information and an inner one is used to establish blockchain-level security in a market fraught with counterfeit products.

Cvetan also pointed to another application for CBD cannabis products with similar goals that uses an NFC tag to create a unique, verifiable identification number for the package.

And she referenced one of the largest smart packaging programs to date, which was done by a major brand working with a major retailer. Packaging Digest reported on this case study of Kraft slice cheese at Walmart (image below) in True Shelf Life in Real Time: There’s an App for That, published March 2020.

Image courtesy TPG Rewards

Cvetan's company offers the proprietary TapScan platform. She informs Packaging Digest that it “provides brand owners the ability to control their message when and where it matters most, at the right time at the right place.” It is available for global executions.

 

The influence of COVID-19 and brand advice.

Mark Baldwin of contactless engagement specialist TUKU kicked off his presentation by noting that the effect of the coronavirus pandemic has been to “effect a decade of change in a few months.”

What should brands do? His advice: In the light of smart packaging they should adapt to survive and prosper by embracing brand control, digital, and data.

“Brands best avenue to do that is through connected packaging,” he said. And he said that brands…

Options and considerations in smart packaging, markets, and engagement. Image courtesy TUKU.

 

Q&A: Sustainability, privacy, and more.

The questions and responses at the end of the webinar were illuminating. Several attendees asked about packaging sustainability for some engagement technologies that may require devices or printed circuits.

“Carbon graphite [inks] are acceptable,” responded Jones’ Lee, “though we don’t know about nanomaterials. However, EAS packaging devices have been collected and recycled for years [without problems] so we don’t expect any risks associated with recovering these materials for recycling."

Brands can also leverage the technology itself via a targeted response to an inquiry about the package's recyclability. “Brands can communicate by location of engagement the local recycling guidelines,” offered Cvetan.

Also, the question of data collection and privacy came up. “Brands must adhere to all privacy requirements—they’re not tracking personal information…in that respect, it’s similar to a standard website interaction,” said Baldwin.

The need for collaboration was a common recommendation. “Open your company up to using partners, especially good ones,” said Cvetan.

What technology to use?

“The engagement method depends on the market, for example QR use is high in Asia, but not so much in North America,” said Lee.

Rather than pick one tech, best practice is to use both NFC tags and QR codes.

We close this report with this advice from Lee: “Don’t use the tech just to use it, use it to solve a business challenge.”

Local save:https://www.packagingdigest.com/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_750x422/public/PD-Food-Sensor-TPG-Cheese2.jpg?itok=ZtlPJAUx

Image process :: Saving local image

grab remote location : https://www.packagingdigest.com/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_750x422/public/PD-Food-Sensor-TPG-Cheese2.jpg?itok=ZtlPJAUx

Image exists, checking for same file size

Replacing images : - ON

Managers from vendor Jones Healthcare Group and consultancies Ahead of the Curve Group and TUKU provide a close-up look at IoT-connected packaging.

 

It turned out be a smart move on my part to attend several of the weekly webinars on packaging topics managed by PAC, Packaging Consortium. One of those hour-long sessions was on smart packaging, where webcast attendees gained up-to-date information, insights, and advice from those in the know. PAC Next consultant Andrew Mcdonald moderated the session that featured presenters…

 

Smart Packaging Levels 3, 4, and 5 are the most exciting.

Leadoff presenter Lee set the stage by defined smart packaging as going beyond traditional packaging that promotes and preserves with added features and capabilities. Lee shared the company’s internal scale of five levels of packaging (main image) going from non-bar-coded dumb boxes at Level 1 to Level 2 with a scannable bar code. Levels 3-5 include technologies such as radio-frequency identification (RFID) chips or tags or near-field communications (NFC) tech.

Levels 3 and 4 refer to smartphone-enabled units and the smartest, Level 5, Jones described as standalone packages that connect to the internet or mobile network without the need for a smartphone.

“Adding connectivity to a package makes it an Internet of Things device,” he pointed out.

According to study data Lee referenced, smartphones are growing virally; in 2015 less than 15% of smartphones offered NFC readability, today that number is close to 90%.

Because Jones operates in the healthcare space, regulatory requirements mandate that it provide 100% inspection of enabled packaging including read and verify quality checks of the smart tag.

Interestingly, the company is proficient at using conductive inks to print circuits directly onto paperboard and plastic substrates.

Current best practices keep the NFC tag hidden and protected inside the packaging. “That also saves valuable on-pack real estate,” he added.

Smart Packaging Experts Talk Tech and Options

Image courtesy Jones Healthcare Group.

The company’s in-market “CpaX” brand connected packaging is used in one application for monitoring consumers’ medicine compliance. For example, when a patient opens a blister pack to access a medication, a notification is sent to a caregiver.

 

NFC, dual-level QR codes, and blockchain.

“We’re a small company with big aspirations,” said Ahead of the Curve Group’s Cvetan, who has 20 years’ experience in packaging development working with brands and retailers.

The company’s smart applications are in three areas: Consumer experience, Product integrity, and Inventory and Lifecycle.

“Product integrity is increasingly important for consumer brands,” she noted.

Smart Packaging Experts Talk Tech and Options

Image courtesy Danone.

Cvetan singled out several exemplary applications in the market that included a dual-Quick Response (QR) code for traceability and authenticity for multiserve containers of Danone baby formula distributed in China. An exterior outer QR code provides consumer-engaging information and an inner one is used to establish blockchain-level security in a market fraught with counterfeit products.

Cvetan also pointed to another application for CBD cannabis products with similar goals that uses an NFC tag to create a unique, verifiable identification number for the package.

And she referenced one of the largest smart packaging programs to date, which was done by a major brand working with a major retailer. Packaging Digest reported on this case study of Kraft slice cheese at Walmart (image below) in True Shelf Life in Real Time: There’s an App for That, published March 2020.

Image courtesy TPG Rewards

Cvetan's company offers the proprietary TapScan platform. She informs Packaging Digest that it “provides brand owners the ability to control their message when and where it matters most, at the right time at the right place.” It is available for global executions.

 

The influence of COVID-19 and brand advice.

Mark Baldwin of contactless engagement specialist TUKU kicked off his presentation by noting that the effect of the coronavirus pandemic has been to “effect a decade of change in a few months.”

What should brands do? His advice: In the light of smart packaging they should adapt to survive and prosper by embracing brand control, digital, and data.

“Brands best avenue to do that is through connected packaging,” he said. And he said that brands…

Options and considerations in smart packaging, markets, and engagement. Image courtesy TUKU.

 

Q&A: Sustainability, privacy, and more.

The questions and responses at the end of the webinar were illuminating. Several attendees asked about packaging sustainability for some engagement technologies that may require devices or printed circuits.

“Carbon graphite [inks] are acceptable,” responded Jones’ Lee, “though we don’t know about nanomaterials. However, EAS packaging devices have been collected and recycled for years [without problems] so we don’t expect any risks associated with recovering these materials for recycling."

Brands can also leverage the technology itself via a targeted response to an inquiry about the package's recyclability. “Brands can communicate by location of engagement the local recycling guidelines,” offered Cvetan.

Also, the question of data collection and privacy came up. “Brands must adhere to all privacy requirements—they’re not tracking personal information…in that respect, it’s similar to a standard website interaction,” said Baldwin.

The need for collaboration was a common recommendation. “Open your company up to using partners, especially good ones,” said Cvetan.

What technology to use?

“The engagement method depends on the market, for example QR use is high in Asia, but not so much in North America,” said Lee.

Rather than pick one tech, best practice is to use both NFC tags and QR codes.

We close this report with this advice from Lee: “Don’t use the tech just to use it, use it to solve a business challenge.”

Local save:https://www.packagingdigest.com/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_750x422/public/1-SmartPkg-Tuku-Data-Sets-PD.jpg?itok=vdUZ0Pim

Image process :: Saving local image

grab remote location : https://www.packagingdigest.com/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_750x422/public/1-SmartPkg-Tuku-Data-Sets-PD.jpg?itok=vdUZ0Pim

Image exists, checking for same file size

Replacing images : - ON

Managers from vendor Jones Healthcare Group and consultancies Ahead of the Curve Group and TUKU provide a close-up look at IoT-connected packaging.

 

It turned out be a smart move on my part to attend several of the weekly webinars on packaging topics managed by PAC, Packaging Consortium. One of those hour-long sessions was on smart packaging, where webcast attendees gained up-to-date information, insights, and advice from those in the know. PAC Next consultant Andrew Mcdonald moderated the session that featured presenters…

 

Smart Packaging Levels 3, 4, and 5 are the most exciting.

Leadoff presenter Lee set the stage by defined smart packaging as going beyond traditional packaging that promotes and preserves with added features and capabilities. Lee shared the company’s internal scale of five levels of packaging (main image) going from non-bar-coded dumb boxes at Level 1 to Level 2 with a scannable bar code. Levels 3-5 include technologies such as radio-frequency identification (RFID) chips or tags or near-field communications (NFC) tech.

Levels 3 and 4 refer to smartphone-enabled units and the smartest, Level 5, Jones described as standalone packages that connect to the internet or mobile network without the need for a smartphone.

“Adding connectivity to a package makes it an Internet of Things device,” he pointed out.

According to study data Lee referenced, smartphones are growing virally; in 2015 less than 15% of smartphones offered NFC readability, today that number is close to 90%.

Because Jones operates in the healthcare space, regulatory requirements mandate that it provide 100% inspection of enabled packaging including read and verify quality checks of the smart tag.

Interestingly, the company is proficient at using conductive inks to print circuits directly onto paperboard and plastic substrates.

Current best practices keep the NFC tag hidden and protected inside the packaging. “That also saves valuable on-pack real estate,” he added.

Smart Packaging Experts Talk Tech and Options

Image courtesy Jones Healthcare Group.

The company’s in-market “CpaX” brand connected packaging is used in one application for monitoring consumers’ medicine compliance. For example, when a patient opens a blister pack to access a medication, a notification is sent to a caregiver.

 

NFC, dual-level QR codes, and blockchain.

“We’re a small company with big aspirations,” said Ahead of the Curve Group’s Cvetan, who has 20 years’ experience in packaging development working with brands and retailers.

The company’s smart applications are in three areas: Consumer experience, Product integrity, and Inventory and Lifecycle.

“Product integrity is increasingly important for consumer brands,” she noted.

Smart Packaging Experts Talk Tech and Options

Image courtesy Danone.

Cvetan singled out several exemplary applications in the market that included a dual-Quick Response (QR) code for traceability and authenticity for multiserve containers of Danone baby formula distributed in China. An exterior outer QR code provides consumer-engaging information and an inner one is used to establish blockchain-level security in a market fraught with counterfeit products.

Cvetan also pointed to another application for CBD cannabis products with similar goals that uses an NFC tag to create a unique, verifiable identification number for the package.

And she referenced one of the largest smart packaging programs to date, which was done by a major brand working with a major retailer. Packaging Digest reported on this case study of Kraft slice cheese at Walmart (image below) in True Shelf Life in Real Time: There’s an App for That, published March 2020.

Smart Packaging Experts Talk Tech and Options

Image courtesy TPG Rewards

Cvetan's company offers the proprietary TapScan platform. She informs Packaging Digest that it “provides brand owners the ability to control their message when and where it matters most, at the right time at the right place.” It is available for global executions.

 

The influence of COVID-19 and brand advice.

Mark Baldwin of contactless engagement specialist TUKU kicked off his presentation by noting that the effect of the coronavirus pandemic has been to “effect a decade of change in a few months.”

What should brands do? His advice: In the light of smart packaging they should adapt to survive and prosper by embracing brand control, digital, and data.

“Brands best avenue to do that is through connected packaging,” he said. And he said that brands…

Options and considerations in smart packaging, markets, and engagement. Image courtesy TUKU.

 

Q&A: Sustainability, privacy, and more.

The questions and responses at the end of the webinar were illuminating. Several attendees asked about packaging sustainability for some engagement technologies that may require devices or printed circuits.

“Carbon graphite [inks] are acceptable,” responded Jones’ Lee, “though we don’t know about nanomaterials. However, EAS packaging devices have been collected and recycled for years [without problems] so we don’t expect any risks associated with recovering these materials for recycling."

Brands can also leverage the technology itself via a targeted response to an inquiry about the package's recyclability. “Brands can communicate by location of engagement the local recycling guidelines,” offered Cvetan.

Also, the question of data collection and privacy came up. “Brands must adhere to all privacy requirements—they’re not tracking personal information…in that respect, it’s similar to a standard website interaction,” said Baldwin.

The need for collaboration was a common recommendation. “Open your company up to using partners, especially good ones,” said Cvetan.

What technology to use?

“The engagement method depends on the market, for example QR use is high in Asia, but not so much in North America,” said Lee.

Rather than pick one tech, best practice is to use both NFC tags and QR codes.

We close this report with this advice from Lee: “Don’t use the tech just to use it, use it to solve a business challenge.”

Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => https://www.packagingdigest.com/sites/default/files/PD-Danone Baby Formula Track Connect Service_Press Photo-White Background_Aptamil English.jpg image/jpeg ) [syndication_source] => Packaging Digest [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.packagingdigest.com [syndication_source_id] => http://www.packagingdigest.com/rss.xml [syndication_feed] => http://www.packagingdigest.com/rss.xml [syndication_feed_id] => 109 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.packagingdigest.com/smart-packaging/smart-packaging-experts-talk-tech-options-2020-05-26 [syndication_item_hash] => a96870dd1e8ccd4f3a102fb852888d2c )

Execute : Enclosure images

Enclosure save:

Array ( [0] => https://www.packagingdigest.com/sites/default/files/PD-Danone Baby Formula Track Connect Service_Press Photo-White Background_Aptamil English.jpg image/jpeg )

grab remote location : https://www.packagingdigest.com/sites/default/files/PD-Danone Baby Formula Track Connect Service_Press Photo-White Background_Aptamil English.jpg

Image exists, checking for same file size

New Enclosure: image/jpeg

Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :Smart Packaging Experts Talk Tech and Options

Array ( [post_title] => Smart Packaging Experts Talk Tech and Options [post_content] =>

Managers from vendor Jones Healthcare Group and consultancies Ahead of the Curve Group and TUKU provide a close-up look at IoT-connected packaging.

 

It turned out be a smart move on my part to attend several of the weekly webinars on packaging topics managed by PAC, Packaging Consortium. One of those hour-long sessions was on smart packaging, where webcast attendees gained up-to-date information, insights, and advice from those in the know. PAC Next consultant Andrew Mcdonald moderated the session that featured presenters…

 

Smart Packaging Levels 3, 4, and 5 are the most exciting.

Leadoff presenter Lee set the stage by defined smart packaging as going beyond traditional packaging that promotes and preserves with added features and capabilities. Lee shared the company’s internal scale of five levels of packaging (main image) going from non-bar-coded dumb boxes at Level 1 to Level 2 with a scannable bar code. Levels 3-5 include technologies such as radio-frequency identification (RFID) chips or tags or near-field communications (NFC) tech.

Levels 3 and 4 refer to smartphone-enabled units and the smartest, Level 5, Jones described as standalone packages that connect to the internet or mobile network without the need for a smartphone.

“Adding connectivity to a package makes it an Internet of Things device,” he pointed out.

According to study data Lee referenced, smartphones are growing virally; in 2015 less than 15% of smartphones offered NFC readability, today that number is close to 90%.

Because Jones operates in the healthcare space, regulatory requirements mandate that it provide 100% inspection of enabled packaging including read and verify quality checks of the smart tag.

Interestingly, the company is proficient at using conductive inks to print circuits directly onto paperboard and plastic substrates.

Current best practices keep the NFC tag hidden and protected inside the packaging. “That also saves valuable on-pack real estate,” he added.

Smart Packaging Experts Talk Tech and Options

Image courtesy Jones Healthcare Group.

The company’s in-market “CpaX” brand connected packaging is used in one application for monitoring consumers’ medicine compliance. For example, when a patient opens a blister pack to access a medication, a notification is sent to a caregiver.

 

NFC, dual-level QR codes, and blockchain.

“We’re a small company with big aspirations,” said Ahead of the Curve Group’s Cvetan, who has 20 years’ experience in packaging development working with brands and retailers.

The company’s smart applications are in three areas: Consumer experience, Product integrity, and Inventory and Lifecycle.

“Product integrity is increasingly important for consumer brands,” she noted.

Smart Packaging Experts Talk Tech and Options

Image courtesy Danone.

Cvetan singled out several exemplary applications in the market that included a dual-Quick Response (QR) code for traceability and authenticity for multiserve containers of Danone baby formula distributed in China. An exterior outer QR code provides consumer-engaging information and an inner one is used to establish blockchain-level security in a market fraught with counterfeit products.

Cvetan also pointed to another application for CBD cannabis products with similar goals that uses an NFC tag to create a unique, verifiable identification number for the package.

And she referenced one of the largest smart packaging programs to date, which was done by a major brand working with a major retailer. Packaging Digest reported on this case study of Kraft slice cheese at Walmart (image below) in True Shelf Life in Real Time: There’s an App for That, published March 2020.

Smart Packaging Experts Talk Tech and Options

Image courtesy TPG Rewards

Cvetan's company offers the proprietary TapScan platform. She informs Packaging Digest that it “provides brand owners the ability to control their message when and where it matters most, at the right time at the right place.” It is available for global executions.

 

The influence of COVID-19 and brand advice.

Mark Baldwin of contactless engagement specialist TUKU kicked off his presentation by noting that the effect of the coronavirus pandemic has been to “effect a decade of change in a few months.”

What should brands do? His advice: In the light of smart packaging they should adapt to survive and prosper by embracing brand control, digital, and data.

“Brands best avenue to do that is through connected packaging,” he said. And he said that brands…

Smart Packaging Experts Talk Tech and Options

Options and considerations in smart packaging, markets, and engagement. Image courtesy TUKU.

 

Q&A: Sustainability, privacy, and more.

The questions and responses at the end of the webinar were illuminating. Several attendees asked about packaging sustainability for some engagement technologies that may require devices or printed circuits.

“Carbon graphite [inks] are acceptable,” responded Jones’ Lee, “though we don’t know about nanomaterials. However, EAS packaging devices have been collected and recycled for years [without problems] so we don’t expect any risks associated with recovering these materials for recycling."

Brands can also leverage the technology itself via a targeted response to an inquiry about the package's recyclability. “Brands can communicate by location of engagement the local recycling guidelines,” offered Cvetan.

Also, the question of data collection and privacy came up. “Brands must adhere to all privacy requirements—they’re not tracking personal information…in that respect, it’s similar to a standard website interaction,” said Baldwin.

The need for collaboration was a common recommendation. “Open your company up to using partners, especially good ones,” said Cvetan.

What technology to use?

“The engagement method depends on the market, for example QR use is high in Asia, but not so much in North America,” said Lee.

Rather than pick one tech, best practice is to use both NFC tags and QR codes.

We close this report with this advice from Lee: “Don’t use the tech just to use it, use it to solve a business challenge.”

[post_excerpt] => Managers from vendor Jones Healthcare Group and consultancies Ahead of the Curve Group and TUKU provide a close-up look at IoT-connected packaging. It turned out be a smart move on my part to attend several of the weekly webinars on packaging topics ma... [post_date_gmt] => 2020-05-26 15:51:31 [post_date] => 2020-05-26 15:51:31 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-05-26 15:51:31 [post_modified] => 2020-05-26 15:51:31 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => 29443 at https://www.packagingdigest.com [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => image/jpeg ) [syndication_source] => Packaging Digest [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.packagingdigest.com [syndication_source_id] => http://www.packagingdigest.com/rss.xml [syndication_feed] => http://www.packagingdigest.com/rss.xml [syndication_feed_id] => 109 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.packagingdigest.com/smart-packaging/smart-packaging-experts-talk-tech-options-2020-05-26 [syndication_item_hash] => a96870dd1e8ccd4f3a102fb852888d2c [faf_featured_image] => 0 [faf_process_image] => 0,0,0,0,0 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 8266 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

FAF deciding on filters on post to be syndicated:

Early Advocate for Senior Friendly Packaging Dies

Array ( [post_title] => Early Advocate for Senior Friendly Packaging Dies [post_content] =>

John Bitner enjoyed life, from his birth on June 4, 1944, until his death on May 14, 2020. For more than 50 of those years, John served the packaging industry with an illustrative career that blended packaging design and engineering across multiple markets and disciplines. Join us on Friday, May 29, to celebrate his life and accomplishments.

 

Imagine you can’t see well, that everything is blurry, and you can’t read the instructions on a package. And you can’t hear what the person helping you is telling you to do. Your hands fumble and your fingers don’t have the dexterity to do a simple task like opening a bottle.

Welcome to old age.

John Bitner realized that packaging engineers could make the world a better place by designing packages that were easy for senior citizens to read, handle, open, and reclose, while still being safe for the rest of the population, especially young children. In his career, John advocated for child-resistant packaging designs that were also senior friendly, especially for pharmaceuticals.

I participated in one of John’s experiments that, through direct experience, taught packaging developers that pharmaceutical packaging desperately needed to be better designed by considering the plight of the user.

At a Chicago Chapter meeting of the Institute of Packaging Professionals sometime in the late 1980s or early 1990s, John had people in the audience pair up, with one person acting as a “senior” and the other as their caregiver. The senior was given glasses smeared with petroleum jelly, ear plugs, and rubber gloves. This instantly turned them into a typical elderly person with bad eyesight, who was hard of hearing, and had arthritic hands that didn’t work well.

These seniors then tried to open different pharmaceutical packages, like a pill bottle or a blister pack. The caregiver was there to help, but without actually opening the packages for the patient. Of course, there was a lot of laughter. Us seniors (I got to play) looked ridiculous, decked out as we were.

But then something remarkable happened. The play turned serious and, as the task to open the packages failed over and over, the frustration of both parties rose to yelling-and-throwing-things levels. Really.

What a great way to make an important point and to spur packaging designers on. Since then, we have seen some improved package and closure designs that are easier to open without compromising safety — efforts that continue with today's emphasis on user-centric design.

Thank you, John, for helping to make all this possible.

John Bitner, 1944-2020

 

What else John taught us.

He stayed busy and involved with packaging. In more recent conversations with John, he and I talked about better packaging for contraceptions and cannabis.

Here are a few of John’s insights, advice, and wisdom over the years:

 

“The packaging requirement for medical marijuana exceeds that for other controlled substances requiring special packaging. The package must be intuitive and easy to use. It is not enough to pass CPSC [Consumer Products Safety Commission] protocol. It must be a package that patients want to use in their home. There can be no exemptions such as we now grant to the elderly or debilitated. Because THC acts directly upon those brain cells called cannabinoids that influence memory, thinking, concentration, time perception, and coordinated movement, which are all required to properly open and re-secure a medical vial package for safety and adherence, packaging design must address impaired coordination and difficulty with thinking, concentration, and problem solving.”

From December 2013, “Letter to the Editor: A Packaging Prescription for Medical Marijuana”

 

“Motivating a patient through fear does not enamor her to use a compliant package. [Instead,] a package can function as a patient partner by providing motivational passion of joy rather than fear.”

From March 2012, “Changing patient behavior with packaging”

 

“When packaging technology interacts directly with research, marketing, and sales, all parties benefit. Ultimately the company as a whole thrives, and the patient survives. Packaging must take its position in marketing, sales, research, discovery ... the early stages of product/market conceptualization/development. Millions of dollars are lost and opportunities for patients sacrificed because of late-arriving catastrophes.”

From August 2014, “Employees report: Doing more with less is mandatory”

 

“…there is an inordinate amount of information in the literature that is neither pertinent [nor] relevant to the patient. The drug manufacturer is mandated to provide a road map–sized amount of literature folded multiple times and wadded up into a one-inch square. What begins as a massive insert becomes nothing more than a single sheet of paper when delivered to the patient at the pharmacy.”

From September 2011, “Quality in packaging”

 

“The number one reason for nursing home admittance is the inability to manage one’s medication regimen. That said, everyone should want to support every aspect of compliant packaging. Designers and engineers who are not aware of a child’s thought process or are not intimate with the daily struggles of the elderly are an impediment to their own initiative. Technical intellect exists within the realm of the multitude of packaging industries. It is their willingness to unleash it that drives success.”

From May 2010, “Pharmaceutical packagers: Compete through innovation”

 

“Seniors sometimes really do forget, but alarms and buzzers won’t make patients take medications if they don’t want to. What does make them compliant is knowledge. Meaningfully educating the patient more than anything will work — not fear-based motivation. If technological innovation can increase communication between a doctor or a pharmacist and a patient, improved adherence will follow.”

From July 2014, “Preparing for patients of the future”

 

A full life and career.

In his online obituary, we learn more about the husband, father, uncle, grandfather (pop pop), as well as about his professional accomplishments. Here is an excerpt:

His accomplished 50+ year career blended art, and design and engineering in packaging, and spanned multiple market signets and disciplines.

Recognized internationally for his work with the Consumer Products Safety Commission for over twenty-five years to protect the lives of our children while improving the quality of life for seniors, John was in the forefront of investigative research related to improved seal integrity and higher barrier performance through adhesion technology, advanced tooling design, equipment innovation, and award-winning structural design.

The Wall Street Journal has hailed John Bitner’s efforts as “evangelical” for senior-friendly packaging and the Public Broadcast System produced a documentary on the challenges of universal design, featuring John’s achievements. He never tired of testing and pushing packaging and technology to make life safe and secure for the young and the elderly. Nor did he tire of a good 18 holes of golf, a drink with a friend, singing with his wife, or thinking of how to make life better. Artist, designer, packaging industry icon, friend.

 

Share your stories and memories.

To celebrate the life and career of John Bitner, one of his colleagues — Peter Schmitt, managing director at healthcare packaging consultancy Montesino — has arranged a virtual wake. The packaging community is invited to briefly share their stories of how they met and worked with John in a Zoom call on Friday, May 29, at 5:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

To attend, click this link on the date and time:

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/85441074735?pwd=UXhSM2hTbUxleWYzWDMxbytTdEtvdz09

Meeting ID: 854 4107 4735

Password: 994021

One tap mobile

+19292056099,,85441074735#,,1#,994021# US (New York)

+16699006833,,85441074735#,,1#,994021# US (San Jose)

Or dial by your location

+1 929 205 6099 US (New York)

+1 669 900 6833 US (San Jose)

Meeting ID: 854 4107 4735

Password: 994021

Find your local number: https://us02web.zoom.us/u/kdR3xyCmAO

 

[post_excerpt] => John Bitner enjoyed life, from his birth on June 4, 1944, until his death on May 14, 2020. For more than 50 of those years, John served the packaging industry with an illustrative career that blended packaging design and engineering across multiple mar... [post_date_gmt] => 2020-05-22 17:30:08 [post_date] => 2020-05-22 17:30:08 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-05-22 17:30:08 [post_modified] => 2020-05-22 17:30:08 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => 29442 at https://www.packagingdigest.com [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => https://www.packagingdigest.com/sites/default/files/John Bitner-LinkedIn-72dpi.jpg image/jpeg ) [syndication_source] => Packaging Digest [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.packagingdigest.com [syndication_source_id] => http://www.packagingdigest.com/rss.xml [syndication_feed] => http://www.packagingdigest.com/rss.xml [syndication_feed_id] => 109 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.packagingdigest.com/pharmaceutical-packaging/early-advocate-for-senior-friendly-packaging-dies-2020-05-22 [syndication_item_hash] => 6358a16f1581b0a9de1a15e24efe849d ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 8266 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

Doing filter:faf_image_filter

Execute image filter

Image process

Local save:https://www.packagingdigest.com/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_750x422/public/John%20Bitner-LinkedIn-72dpi.jpg?itok=y_YsK3oW

Image process :: Saving local image

grab remote location : https://www.packagingdigest.com/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_750x422/public/John%20Bitner-LinkedIn-72dpi.jpg?itok=y_YsK3oW

Image exists, checking for same file size

Replacing images : - ON

John Bitner enjoyed life, from his birth on June 4, 1944, until his death on May 14, 2020. For more than 50 of those years, John served the packaging industry with an illustrative career that blended packaging design and engineering across multiple markets and disciplines. Join us on Friday, May 29, to celebrate his life and accomplishments.

 

Imagine you can’t see well, that everything is blurry, and you can’t read the instructions on a package. And you can’t hear what the person helping you is telling you to do. Your hands fumble and your fingers don’t have the dexterity to do a simple task like opening a bottle.

Welcome to old age.

John Bitner realized that packaging engineers could make the world a better place by designing packages that were easy for senior citizens to read, handle, open, and reclose, while still being safe for the rest of the population, especially young children. In his career, John advocated for child-resistant packaging designs that were also senior friendly, especially for pharmaceuticals.

I participated in one of John’s experiments that, through direct experience, taught packaging developers that pharmaceutical packaging desperately needed to be better designed by considering the plight of the user.

At a Chicago Chapter meeting of the Institute of Packaging Professionals sometime in the late 1980s or early 1990s, John had people in the audience pair up, with one person acting as a “senior” and the other as their caregiver. The senior was given glasses smeared with petroleum jelly, ear plugs, and rubber gloves. This instantly turned them into a typical elderly person with bad eyesight, who was hard of hearing, and had arthritic hands that didn’t work well.

These seniors then tried to open different pharmaceutical packages, like a pill bottle or a blister pack. The caregiver was there to help, but without actually opening the packages for the patient. Of course, there was a lot of laughter. Us seniors (I got to play) looked ridiculous, decked out as we were.

But then something remarkable happened. The play turned serious and, as the task to open the packages failed over and over, the frustration of both parties rose to yelling-and-throwing-things levels. Really.

What a great way to make an important point and to spur packaging designers on. Since then, we have seen some improved package and closure designs that are easier to open without compromising safety — efforts that continue with today's emphasis on user-centric design.

Thank you, John, for helping to make all this possible.

John Bitner, 1944-2020

 

What else John taught us.

He stayed busy and involved with packaging. In more recent conversations with John, he and I talked about better packaging for contraceptions and cannabis.

Here are a few of John’s insights, advice, and wisdom over the years:

 

“The packaging requirement for medical marijuana exceeds that for other controlled substances requiring special packaging. The package must be intuitive and easy to use. It is not enough to pass CPSC [Consumer Products Safety Commission] protocol. It must be a package that patients want to use in their home. There can be no exemptions such as we now grant to the elderly or debilitated. Because THC acts directly upon those brain cells called cannabinoids that influence memory, thinking, concentration, time perception, and coordinated movement, which are all required to properly open and re-secure a medical vial package for safety and adherence, packaging design must address impaired coordination and difficulty with thinking, concentration, and problem solving.”

From December 2013, “Letter to the Editor: A Packaging Prescription for Medical Marijuana”

 

“Motivating a patient through fear does not enamor her to use a compliant package. [Instead,] a package can function as a patient partner by providing motivational passion of joy rather than fear.”

From March 2012, “Changing patient behavior with packaging”

 

“When packaging technology interacts directly with research, marketing, and sales, all parties benefit. Ultimately the company as a whole thrives, and the patient survives. Packaging must take its position in marketing, sales, research, discovery ... the early stages of product/market conceptualization/development. Millions of dollars are lost and opportunities for patients sacrificed because of late-arriving catastrophes.”

From August 2014, “Employees report: Doing more with less is mandatory”

 

“…there is an inordinate amount of information in the literature that is neither pertinent [nor] relevant to the patient. The drug manufacturer is mandated to provide a road map–sized amount of literature folded multiple times and wadded up into a one-inch square. What begins as a massive insert becomes nothing more than a single sheet of paper when delivered to the patient at the pharmacy.”

From September 2011, “Quality in packaging”

 

“The number one reason for nursing home admittance is the inability to manage one’s medication regimen. That said, everyone should want to support every aspect of compliant packaging. Designers and engineers who are not aware of a child’s thought process or are not intimate with the daily struggles of the elderly are an impediment to their own initiative. Technical intellect exists within the realm of the multitude of packaging industries. It is their willingness to unleash it that drives success.”

From May 2010, “Pharmaceutical packagers: Compete through innovation”

 

“Seniors sometimes really do forget, but alarms and buzzers won’t make patients take medications if they don’t want to. What does make them compliant is knowledge. Meaningfully educating the patient more than anything will work — not fear-based motivation. If technological innovation can increase communication between a doctor or a pharmacist and a patient, improved adherence will follow.”

From July 2014, “Preparing for patients of the future”

 

A full life and career.

In his online obituary, we learn more about the husband, father, uncle, grandfather (pop pop), as well as about his professional accomplishments. Here is an excerpt:

His accomplished 50+ year career blended art, and design and engineering in packaging, and spanned multiple market signets and disciplines.

Recognized internationally for his work with the Consumer Products Safety Commission for over twenty-five years to protect the lives of our children while improving the quality of life for seniors, John was in the forefront of investigative research related to improved seal integrity and higher barrier performance through adhesion technology, advanced tooling design, equipment innovation, and award-winning structural design.

The Wall Street Journal has hailed John Bitner’s efforts as “evangelical” for senior-friendly packaging and the Public Broadcast System produced a documentary on the challenges of universal design, featuring John’s achievements. He never tired of testing and pushing packaging and technology to make life safe and secure for the young and the elderly. Nor did he tire of a good 18 holes of golf, a drink with a friend, singing with his wife, or thinking of how to make life better. Artist, designer, packaging industry icon, friend.

 

Share your stories and memories.

To celebrate the life and career of John Bitner, one of his colleagues — Peter Schmitt, managing director at healthcare packaging consultancy Montesino — has arranged a virtual wake. The packaging community is invited to briefly share their stories of how they met and worked with John in a Zoom call on Friday, May 29, at 5:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

To attend, click this link on the date and time:

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/85441074735?pwd=UXhSM2hTbUxleWYzWDMxbytTdEtvdz09

Meeting ID: 854 4107 4735

Password: 994021

One tap mobile

+19292056099,,85441074735#,,1#,994021# US (New York)

+16699006833,,85441074735#,,1#,994021# US (San Jose)

Or dial by your location

+1 929 205 6099 US (New York)

+1 669 900 6833 US (San Jose)

Meeting ID: 854 4107 4735

Password: 994021

Find your local number: https://us02web.zoom.us/u/kdR3xyCmAO

 

Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => https://www.packagingdigest.com/sites/default/files/John Bitner-LinkedIn-72dpi.jpg image/jpeg ) [syndication_source] => Packaging Digest [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.packagingdigest.com [syndication_source_id] => http://www.packagingdigest.com/rss.xml [syndication_feed] => http://www.packagingdigest.com/rss.xml [syndication_feed_id] => 109 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.packagingdigest.com/pharmaceutical-packaging/early-advocate-for-senior-friendly-packaging-dies-2020-05-22 [syndication_item_hash] => 6358a16f1581b0a9de1a15e24efe849d )

Execute : Enclosure images

Enclosure save:

Array ( [0] => https://www.packagingdigest.com/sites/default/files/John Bitner-LinkedIn-72dpi.jpg image/jpeg )

grab remote location : https://www.packagingdigest.com/sites/default/files/John Bitner-LinkedIn-72dpi.jpg

Image exists, checking for same file size

New Enclosure: image/jpeg

Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :Early Advocate for Senior Friendly Packaging Dies

Array ( [post_title] => Early Advocate for Senior Friendly Packaging Dies [post_content] =>

John Bitner enjoyed life, from his birth on June 4, 1944, until his death on May 14, 2020. For more than 50 of those years, John served the packaging industry with an illustrative career that blended packaging design and engineering across multiple markets and disciplines. Join us on Friday, May 29, to celebrate his life and accomplishments.

 

Imagine you can’t see well, that everything is blurry, and you can’t read the instructions on a package. And you can’t hear what the person helping you is telling you to do. Your hands fumble and your fingers don’t have the dexterity to do a simple task like opening a bottle.

Welcome to old age.

John Bitner realized that packaging engineers could make the world a better place by designing packages that were easy for senior citizens to read, handle, open, and reclose, while still being safe for the rest of the population, especially young children. In his career, John advocated for child-resistant packaging designs that were also senior friendly, especially for pharmaceuticals.

I participated in one of John’s experiments that, through direct experience, taught packaging developers that pharmaceutical packaging desperately needed to be better designed by considering the plight of the user.

At a Chicago Chapter meeting of the Institute of Packaging Professionals sometime in the late 1980s or early 1990s, John had people in the audience pair up, with one person acting as a “senior” and the other as their caregiver. The senior was given glasses smeared with petroleum jelly, ear plugs, and rubber gloves. This instantly turned them into a typical elderly person with bad eyesight, who was hard of hearing, and had arthritic hands that didn’t work well.

These seniors then tried to open different pharmaceutical packages, like a pill bottle or a blister pack. The caregiver was there to help, but without actually opening the packages for the patient. Of course, there was a lot of laughter. Us seniors (I got to play) looked ridiculous, decked out as we were.

But then something remarkable happened. The play turned serious and, as the task to open the packages failed over and over, the frustration of both parties rose to yelling-and-throwing-things levels. Really.

What a great way to make an important point and to spur packaging designers on. Since then, we have seen some improved package and closure designs that are easier to open without compromising safety — efforts that continue with today's emphasis on user-centric design.

Thank you, John, for helping to make all this possible.

Early Advocate for Senior Friendly Packaging Dies

John Bitner, 1944-2020

 

What else John taught us.

He stayed busy and involved with packaging. In more recent conversations with John, he and I talked about better packaging for contraceptions and cannabis.

Here are a few of John’s insights, advice, and wisdom over the years:

 

“The packaging requirement for medical marijuana exceeds that for other controlled substances requiring special packaging. The package must be intuitive and easy to use. It is not enough to pass CPSC [Consumer Products Safety Commission] protocol. It must be a package that patients want to use in their home. There can be no exemptions such as we now grant to the elderly or debilitated. Because THC acts directly upon those brain cells called cannabinoids that influence memory, thinking, concentration, time perception, and coordinated movement, which are all required to properly open and re-secure a medical vial package for safety and adherence, packaging design must address impaired coordination and difficulty with thinking, concentration, and problem solving.”

From December 2013, “Letter to the Editor: A Packaging Prescription for Medical Marijuana”

 

“Motivating a patient through fear does not enamor her to use a compliant package. [Instead,] a package can function as a patient partner by providing motivational passion of joy rather than fear.”

From March 2012, “Changing patient behavior with packaging”

 

“When packaging technology interacts directly with research, marketing, and sales, all parties benefit. Ultimately the company as a whole thrives, and the patient survives. Packaging must take its position in marketing, sales, research, discovery ... the early stages of product/market conceptualization/development. Millions of dollars are lost and opportunities for patients sacrificed because of late-arriving catastrophes.”

From August 2014, “Employees report: Doing more with less is mandatory”

 

“…there is an inordinate amount of information in the literature that is neither pertinent [nor] relevant to the patient. The drug manufacturer is mandated to provide a road map–sized amount of literature folded multiple times and wadded up into a one-inch square. What begins as a massive insert becomes nothing more than a single sheet of paper when delivered to the patient at the pharmacy.”

From September 2011, “Quality in packaging”

 

“The number one reason for nursing home admittance is the inability to manage one’s medication regimen. That said, everyone should want to support every aspect of compliant packaging. Designers and engineers who are not aware of a child’s thought process or are not intimate with the daily struggles of the elderly are an impediment to their own initiative. Technical intellect exists within the realm of the multitude of packaging industries. It is their willingness to unleash it that drives success.”

From May 2010, “Pharmaceutical packagers: Compete through innovation”

 

“Seniors sometimes really do forget, but alarms and buzzers won’t make patients take medications if they don’t want to. What does make them compliant is knowledge. Meaningfully educating the patient more than anything will work — not fear-based motivation. If technological innovation can increase communication between a doctor or a pharmacist and a patient, improved adherence will follow.”

From July 2014, “Preparing for patients of the future”

 

A full life and career.

In his online obituary, we learn more about the husband, father, uncle, grandfather (pop pop), as well as about his professional accomplishments. Here is an excerpt:

His accomplished 50+ year career blended art, and design and engineering in packaging, and spanned multiple market signets and disciplines.

Recognized internationally for his work with the Consumer Products Safety Commission for over twenty-five years to protect the lives of our children while improving the quality of life for seniors, John was in the forefront of investigative research related to improved seal integrity and higher barrier performance through adhesion technology, advanced tooling design, equipment innovation, and award-winning structural design.

The Wall Street Journal has hailed John Bitner’s efforts as “evangelical” for senior-friendly packaging and the Public Broadcast System produced a documentary on the challenges of universal design, featuring John’s achievements. He never tired of testing and pushing packaging and technology to make life safe and secure for the young and the elderly. Nor did he tire of a good 18 holes of golf, a drink with a friend, singing with his wife, or thinking of how to make life better. Artist, designer, packaging industry icon, friend.

 

Share your stories and memories.

To celebrate the life and career of John Bitner, one of his colleagues — Peter Schmitt, managing director at healthcare packaging consultancy Montesino — has arranged a virtual wake. The packaging community is invited to briefly share their stories of how they met and worked with John in a Zoom call on Friday, May 29, at 5:00 p.m. Eastern Time.

To attend, click this link on the date and time:

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/85441074735?pwd=UXhSM2hTbUxleWYzWDMxbytTdEtvdz09

Meeting ID: 854 4107 4735

Password: 994021

One tap mobile

+19292056099,,85441074735#,,1#,994021# US (New York)

+16699006833,,85441074735#,,1#,994021# US (San Jose)

Or dial by your location

+1 929 205 6099 US (New York)

+1 669 900 6833 US (San Jose)

Meeting ID: 854 4107 4735

Password: 994021

Find your local number: https://us02web.zoom.us/u/kdR3xyCmAO

 

[post_excerpt] => John Bitner enjoyed life, from his birth on June 4, 1944, until his death on May 14, 2020. For more than 50 of those years, John served the packaging industry with an illustrative career that blended packaging design and engineering across multiple mar... [post_date_gmt] => 2020-05-22 17:30:08 [post_date] => 2020-05-22 17:30:08 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-05-22 17:30:08 [post_modified] => 2020-05-22 17:30:08 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => 29442 at https://www.packagingdigest.com [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => image/jpeg ) [syndication_source] => Packaging Digest [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.packagingdigest.com [syndication_source_id] => http://www.packagingdigest.com/rss.xml [syndication_feed] => http://www.packagingdigest.com/rss.xml [syndication_feed_id] => 109 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.packagingdigest.com/pharmaceutical-packaging/early-advocate-for-senior-friendly-packaging-dies-2020-05-22 [syndication_item_hash] => 6358a16f1581b0a9de1a15e24efe849d [faf_featured_image] => 0 [faf_process_image] => 0,0 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 8266 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

FAF deciding on filters on post to be syndicated:

7-Axis Cobot Reaches Farther Without a Higher Price

Array ( [post_title] => 7-Axis Cobot Reaches Farther Without a Higher Price [post_content] =>

For packaging operations like case packing or palletizing that need a collaborative robot (cobot) to stretch farther in the workspace to get the job done, a new teachable robot has a reach of 1.25 meters (4+ feet) with a payload of 4 kilograms (almost 9 lbs). Like other cobots, this 7-axis system learns tasks without programming.

The OB7-Stretch from Productive Robotics Inc. is the fourth product in the company’s line of 7-axis cobots. Any of the OB7 models — OB7, OB7 Stretch, OB7 Max 12, and OB7 Max 8 — have extra dexterity to reach around obstacles and perform well in confined spaces, compared to 6-axis systems. How? Because each joint can rotate 360 degrees — both clockwise and counterclockwise. Zac Bogart, Productive Robotics’ president, says, “The extreme rotation capability of each of OB7’s 7 axes give OB7 unmatched maneuverability.”

The OB7-Stretch sells for $25,000, which, Bogart tells us, is substantially less expensive than other long-reach cobots. To hit this price point while extending the reach of the standard OB7, the OB7-Stretch shares the engineering design of the standard 5kg OB7 but with a lower payload capability.

Bogart explains how the new OB7-Stretch fills the need for a longer reach at an affordable cost for packaging operations: “Packaging applications require more floor space than machine tending. The longer reach is needed to support the larger area required for packaging.”

Here’s how the new OB7-Stretch (second from the top) compares to other products in the OB7 line.

 

[post_excerpt] => For packaging operations like case packing or palletizing that need a collaborative robot (cobot) to stretch farther in the workspace to get the job done, a new teachable robot has a reach of 1.25 meters (4+ feet) with a payload of 4 kilograms (almost ... [post_date_gmt] => 2020-05-22 13:33:23 [post_date] => 2020-05-22 13:33:23 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-05-22 13:33:23 [post_modified] => 2020-05-22 13:33:23 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => 29441 at https://www.packagingdigest.com [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => https://www.packagingdigest.com/sites/default/files/Productive Robotics_OB7 robot line_April 2020-72dpi.jpg image/jpeg ) [syndication_source] => Packaging Digest [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.packagingdigest.com [syndication_source_id] => http://www.packagingdigest.com/rss.xml [syndication_feed] => http://www.packagingdigest.com/rss.xml [syndication_feed_id] => 109 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.packagingdigest.com/robotics/7-axis-cobot-reaches-farther-without-a-higher-price-2020-05-22 [syndication_item_hash] => 62910805e715aa027d7a971b38f2a110 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 8266 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

Doing filter:faf_image_filter

Execute image filter

Image process

Local save:https://www.packagingdigest.com/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_750x422/public/Productive%20Robotics_OB7%20robot%20line_April%202020-72dpi.jpg?itok=j3Rvd5gK

Image process :: Saving local image

grab remote location : https://www.packagingdigest.com/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_750x422/public/Productive%20Robotics_OB7%20robot%20line_April%202020-72dpi.jpg?itok=j3Rvd5gK

Image exists, checking for same file size

Replacing images : - ON

For packaging operations like case packing or palletizing that need a collaborative robot (cobot) to stretch farther in the workspace to get the job done, a new teachable robot has a reach of 1.25 meters (4+ feet) with a payload of 4 kilograms (almost 9 lbs). Like other cobots, this 7-axis system learns tasks without programming.

The OB7-Stretch from Productive Robotics Inc. is the fourth product in the company’s line of 7-axis cobots. Any of the OB7 models — OB7, OB7 Stretch, OB7 Max 12, and OB7 Max 8 — have extra dexterity to reach around obstacles and perform well in confined spaces, compared to 6-axis systems. How? Because each joint can rotate 360 degrees — both clockwise and counterclockwise. Zac Bogart, Productive Robotics’ president, says, “The extreme rotation capability of each of OB7’s 7 axes give OB7 unmatched maneuverability.”

The OB7-Stretch sells for $25,000, which, Bogart tells us, is substantially less expensive than other long-reach cobots. To hit this price point while extending the reach of the standard OB7, the OB7-Stretch shares the engineering design of the standard 5kg OB7 but with a lower payload capability.

Bogart explains how the new OB7-Stretch fills the need for a longer reach at an affordable cost for packaging operations: “Packaging applications require more floor space than machine tending. The longer reach is needed to support the larger area required for packaging.”

Here’s how the new OB7-Stretch (second from the top) compares to other products in the OB7 line.

 

Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => https://www.packagingdigest.com/sites/default/files/Productive Robotics_OB7 robot line_April 2020-72dpi.jpg image/jpeg ) [syndication_source] => Packaging Digest [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.packagingdigest.com [syndication_source_id] => http://www.packagingdigest.com/rss.xml [syndication_feed] => http://www.packagingdigest.com/rss.xml [syndication_feed_id] => 109 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.packagingdigest.com/robotics/7-axis-cobot-reaches-farther-without-a-higher-price-2020-05-22 [syndication_item_hash] => 62910805e715aa027d7a971b38f2a110 )

Execute : Enclosure images

Enclosure save:

Array ( [0] => https://www.packagingdigest.com/sites/default/files/Productive Robotics_OB7 robot line_April 2020-72dpi.jpg image/jpeg )

grab remote location : https://www.packagingdigest.com/sites/default/files/Productive Robotics_OB7 robot line_April 2020-72dpi.jpg

Image exists, checking for same file size

New Enclosure: image/jpeg

Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :7-Axis Cobot Reaches Farther Without a Higher Price

Array ( [post_title] => 7-Axis Cobot Reaches Farther Without a Higher Price [post_content] =>

For packaging operations like case packing or palletizing that need a collaborative robot (cobot) to stretch farther in the workspace to get the job done, a new teachable robot has a reach of 1.25 meters (4+ feet) with a payload of 4 kilograms (almost 9 lbs). Like other cobots, this 7-axis system learns tasks without programming.

The OB7-Stretch from Productive Robotics Inc. is the fourth product in the company’s line of 7-axis cobots. Any of the OB7 models — OB7, OB7 Stretch, OB7 Max 12, and OB7 Max 8 — have extra dexterity to reach around obstacles and perform well in confined spaces, compared to 6-axis systems. How? Because each joint can rotate 360 degrees — both clockwise and counterclockwise. Zac Bogart, Productive Robotics’ president, says, “The extreme rotation capability of each of OB7’s 7 axes give OB7 unmatched maneuverability.”

The OB7-Stretch sells for $25,000, which, Bogart tells us, is substantially less expensive than other long-reach cobots. To hit this price point while extending the reach of the standard OB7, the OB7-Stretch shares the engineering design of the standard 5kg OB7 but with a lower payload capability.

Bogart explains how the new OB7-Stretch fills the need for a longer reach at an affordable cost for packaging operations: “Packaging applications require more floor space than machine tending. The longer reach is needed to support the larger area required for packaging.”

7-Axis Cobot Reaches Farther Without a Higher Price

Here’s how the new OB7-Stretch (second from the top) compares to other products in the OB7 line.

 

[post_excerpt] => For packaging operations like case packing or palletizing that need a collaborative robot (cobot) to stretch farther in the workspace to get the job done, a new teachable robot has a reach of 1.25 meters (4+ feet) with a payload of 4 kilograms (almost ... [post_date_gmt] => 2020-05-22 13:33:23 [post_date] => 2020-05-22 13:33:23 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-05-22 13:33:23 [post_modified] => 2020-05-22 13:33:23 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => 29441 at https://www.packagingdigest.com [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => image/jpeg ) [syndication_source] => Packaging Digest [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.packagingdigest.com [syndication_source_id] => http://www.packagingdigest.com/rss.xml [syndication_feed] => http://www.packagingdigest.com/rss.xml [syndication_feed_id] => 109 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.packagingdigest.com/robotics/7-axis-cobot-reaches-farther-without-a-higher-price-2020-05-22 [syndication_item_hash] => 62910805e715aa027d7a971b38f2a110 [faf_featured_image] => 0 [faf_process_image] => 0,0 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 8266 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

FAF deciding on filters on post to be syndicated:

Kao’s ‘Air’ Bottle Leverages the Virtues of Lightweight Packaging

Array ( [post_title] => Kao’s ‘Air’ Bottle Leverages the Virtues of Lightweight Packaging [post_content] =>

Kao’s new recyclable package for MyKirei personal care products — which uses up to 50% less plastic by weight than traditional rigid plastic bottles with pumps — embodies functional, emotional, and social benefits of a holistic sustainable design.

 

While the recyclability challenges of lightweighted packaging are of increasing importance to producers and consumers, the tremendous benefits of smaller, lighter packages must be acknowledged to find solutions that balance their virtues with more intuitive resource management.

Less material by weight equals fewer resources extracted from the planet, and less waste if disposed compared to heavier packages. For producers, less packaging brings down production costs overall, and with lighter, less voluminous shipments, transportation costs by weight, which are additionally offset by the ability to fit more items on a truck or pallet.

This translates for consumers, who enjoy increased access to products by the pricing and delivery of packaged goods in-store. Ecommerce relies heavily on lightweight packing material to maintain product quality from point A to B, and even “non-packaged” items such as clothing, fresh produce, and durable goods like furniture and automobiles are often packaged for distribution.

Lightweight packaging also lends itself to beauty and utility. Many packages are lightweighted by using plastic and other synthetics, which have near-endless potential for colorization, shaping, printing, and textures, often rendered to resemble wood, glass, and other high-value, aesthetically pleasing materials.

Flexibles and films, ubiquitous across the packaging supply chain, have versatile characteristics. In sachets, pouches, cling wraps, and bags (which recycling critic John Tierney calls, not inaccurately, “a marvel of economic, engineering, and environmental efficiency”), these thin plastics are cheap, strong, and often elegant in design, making lots of sense from a utilitarian and practical perspective.

It cannot be overstated that no lightweighted packaging material, namely plastics, in and of itself is at the crux of our issues with recyclability, pollution, and waste. It’s the way we use them, intentionally designing items to be thrown away in a global recycling system that isn’t equipped to effectively recover it for additional cycles of production.

But just as the material, shape, and si