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IO-Link description file database grows

Array ( [post_title] => IO-Link description file database grows [post_content] =>

IO-Link description file database grows

The IODDfinder is centralised, cross-manufacturer database containing IO-Link description files

The database, which is maintained by members of the IO-Link community, now hosts more than 7,500 description files from around 80 manufacturers, making it the world’s largest collection of IODDs. 

By joining the community, each member gets the opportunity to create a manufacturer account in IODDfinder so they can upload the description files for their devices there. The platform features a web front end which people can use to search for and find IODDs for individual devices.

The added value comes from the application program interfaces (APIs) which device manufactures can also use to automatically upload, update and manage a large number of IODDs. These interfaces ensure that the central database is always complete and that their content is always up to date. 

Description files can also be downloaded automatically using APIs. This allows software tools to access the database over the Internet for device configuration or integration into automation systems, for example.

A majority of downloads are now carried out using such tools. Each IO-Link device features its own device ID and a specific manufacturer ID. The software tools can read out these two identification numbers immediately after connecting to IO-Link devices and – if they are online – download the appropriate description file from the Internet fully automatically. This enables the software tool to communicate with the connected IO-Link device immediately after the download. 

IODDfinder is available free of charge to users of the web front end.  www.io-link.com 

> [post_excerpt] =>

The IODDfinder is centralised, cross-manufacturer database containing IO-Link description files [post_date_gmt] => 2020-02-18 10:23:26 [post_date] => 2020-02-18 10:23:26 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-02-18 10:23:26 [post_modified] => 2020-02-18 10:23:26 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => CEE-176962 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => global/showimage.ashx?Type=Article&ID=184299 image/jpeg ) [syndication_source] => Control Engineering Europe - All Articles [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_source_id] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed_id] => 17 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/rss/article/176962/IO-Link-description-file-database-grows.aspx [syndication_item_hash] => 3bfaf9bd93cf520a125d88d42852cf61 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

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Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => global/showimage.ashx?Type=Article&ID=184299 image/jpeg ) [syndication_source] => Control Engineering Europe - All Articles [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_source_id] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed_id] => 17 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/rss/article/176962/IO-Link-description-file-database-grows.aspx [syndication_item_hash] => 3bfaf9bd93cf520a125d88d42852cf61 )

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Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :IO-Link description file database grows

Array ( [post_title] => IO-Link description file database grows [post_content] =>

IO-Link description file database grows

The IODDfinder is centralised, cross-manufacturer database containing IO-Link description files

The database, which is maintained by members of the IO-Link community, now hosts more than 7,500 description files from around 80 manufacturers, making it the world’s largest collection of IODDs. 

By joining the community, each member gets the opportunity to create a manufacturer account in IODDfinder so they can upload the description files for their devices there. The platform features a web front end which people can use to search for and find IODDs for individual devices.

The added value comes from the application program interfaces (APIs) which device manufactures can also use to automatically upload, update and manage a large number of IODDs. These interfaces ensure that the central database is always complete and that their content is always up to date. 

Description files can also be downloaded automatically using APIs. This allows software tools to access the database over the Internet for device configuration or integration into automation systems, for example.

A majority of downloads are now carried out using such tools. Each IO-Link device features its own device ID and a specific manufacturer ID. The software tools can read out these two identification numbers immediately after connecting to IO-Link devices and – if they are online – download the appropriate description file from the Internet fully automatically. This enables the software tool to communicate with the connected IO-Link device immediately after the download. 

IODDfinder is available free of charge to users of the web front end.  www.io-link.com 

> [post_excerpt] =>

The IODDfinder is centralised, cross-manufacturer database containing IO-Link description files [post_date_gmt] => 2020-02-18 10:23:26 [post_date] => 2020-02-18 10:23:26 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-02-18 10:23:26 [post_modified] => 2020-02-18 10:23:26 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => CEE-176962 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => global/showimage.ashx?Type=Article&ID=184299 image/jpeg ) [syndication_source] => Control Engineering Europe - All Articles [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_source_id] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed_id] => 17 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/rss/article/176962/IO-Link-description-file-database-grows.aspx [syndication_item_hash] => 3bfaf9bd93cf520a125d88d42852cf61 [faf_process_image] => ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )


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Enhancing safety with mobile solutions

Array ( [post_title] => Enhancing safety with mobile solutions [post_content] =>

Enhancing safety with mobile solutions

The goal of enterprise mobility solutions is to network people, plants and systems, using data as efficiently as possible. The use of intrinsically safe smart devices can help improve productivity and the safety of employees, says Dietmaer Deppisch.

The flood of coming from modern production facilities is usually managed by central controls. However, for comprehensive and timely monitoring of processes, data needs to be available closer to the process and more directly – preferably in real time and with low latency. Modern, intrinsically safe (IS) smartphones and tablets can serve as decentralised mini data centers or digital gateways – for example in combination with professional software, sensors, beacons or other smart peripheral devices. The accumulated data can be transferred to the mobile device in real time and evaluated there, with the corresponding applications, at any location and at any time. This solution can help improve productivity and also significantly raises employee safety in hazardous areas.

The right safety level
Employees frequently work alone on the plant floor, outside the range of hearing and vision of their colleagues. They can be exposed to higher risks in their daily work and depend on quick assistance in case of an emergency. If no appropriate safety precautions are taken, injuries, accidents and consequential damage to people and equipment can easily occur. The company must ensure that an accident is detected and the rescue chain is set in motion swiftly. In case of critical hazards it is mandatory to set up a certified lone-worker protection solution (LWP).

Programmable 3D motion sensors can automatically trigger an alarm in the event of a hazard, report the exact location of the incident and document the entire process for later investigation. 

A typical comprehensive lone worker protection system will consist of Personal Alarm Signal Terminals (PAST) just as a mobile phone or wireless device; Personal Alarm Signal System (PASS) (software on server); and connection between the PASS and PAST  via telephone or wireless network. For larger scale lone worker protection solutions mobile devices can easily be integrated into cloud server systems. The Pepperl+Fuchs brand ecom offers such solutions. 

A practical example
A power plant operator in northern Italy offers a good demonstration of the benefits of a lone worker protection solution consisting of mobile devices and specifically for hazardous areas developed Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) beacons. 

The management was looking for a reliable automated system that would help prevent accidents and reduce the time for a potential rescue to an absolute minimum. It chose a solution with ecom's smartphone series Smart-Ex and beacon series Loc-Ex – both certified for use in Zone 1/21 and Division 1. With BLE beacons employees can also be located indoors or be warned of possible hazards in advance. They have an interior range of approximately 10 to 30m and up to 300m in the open field. The signal from the beacon is received by an application on the Smart-Ex smartphone and the distance to the beacon is calculated.

When the mobile worker enters the working area, the location can be read out accurately – even three-dimensionally, i.e. across floors – and forwarded to the control center´s central navigation system. The user is not dependent on an Internet connection, because the mobile devices and applications store the beacon signals locally on the device and send them immediately to update the backend system as soon as access to the company network is available. Compared to other geo-location technologies, this beacon technology offers a high degree of precision and accuracy in all three axes. The position of the mobile worker is stored in the temporary memory of the device and only forwarded to the rescuer in the event of an alarm. It cannot be retrieved either from the device itself or from the outside, from the alarm console in the control center or by subsequent technical analysis. The solution meets all data protection requirements, guarantees the safety of lone workers and, in an emergency, reduces the response times of the rescuers to a minimum.

In another scenario, an oil company commissioned Italian institute L'Istituto di Vigilanza dell'Urbe (IVU) to optimise and secure the refueling of petrol tanks at gas stations. This posed a challenge due to the high safety measures for the refueling process. Delivery and filling, for example, may only be carried out by specialised forwarding agents, under the supervision of a qualified person. The goal was to centralise the monitoring of tank processes in a control center and to implement a comprehensive protection system for lone workers. When selecting and integrating a solution, IVU relied on a specialist systems integrator for radio communication and control rooms. This company designed a complete all-in-one solution employing ecom IS mobile devices.

These mobile devices are equipped with a push-to-talk-over-cellular application. In the event of an accident, rescue workers can be notified immediately via Lone Worker Protection applications. Programmable 3D motion sensors automatically start an SOS request when, for example, the device falls off or no movement is detected. Each work area has been mapped with geofencing so the software detects the GPS position of the worker. This guarantees that an accident is always instantly detected. All SOS requests also activate the hands-free function of the smartphone as well as its camera which allows the control center to assess whether the employee is responsive and of what kind the injuries are. Where previously two people (for example, a truck driver and supervisor) were necessary because of safety requirements, one driver is now sufficient. The supervisor no longer has to be on site, because the devices are monitored continuously (GPS position, battery charge, signal quality, connection status) and entries and exits in a filling station are automatically noted. The control room supervisor will be able to determine, in seconds, whether an alarm is real. It is also possible to document an emergency situation by using recorded voice communication, video streaming, GPS position and event logs. The documentation of the entire rescue chain makes the process evaluable and provides an effective basis for further optimising alert processes.

Dietmar Deppisch is business development manager Applications, ECOM Instruments at Pepperl + Fuchs.

> [post_excerpt] =>

The goal of enterprise mobility solutions is to network people, plants and systems, using data as efficiently as possible. The use of intrinsically safe smart devices can help improve productivity and the safety of employees, says Dietmaer Deppisch. [post_date_gmt] => 2020-02-18 09:35:00 [post_date] => 2020-02-18 09:35:00 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-02-18 09:35:00 [post_modified] => 2020-02-18 09:35:00 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => CEE-176957 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => global/showimage.ashx?Type=Article&ID=184292 image/jpeg ) [syndication_source] => Control Engineering Europe - All Articles [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_source_id] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed_id] => 17 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/rss/article/176957/Enhancing-safety-with-mobile-solutions.aspx [syndication_item_hash] => c2dc5fbc17cb0fd9685937421ce51d30 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

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Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => global/showimage.ashx?Type=Article&ID=184292 image/jpeg ) [syndication_source] => Control Engineering Europe - All Articles [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_source_id] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed_id] => 17 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/rss/article/176957/Enhancing-safety-with-mobile-solutions.aspx [syndication_item_hash] => c2dc5fbc17cb0fd9685937421ce51d30 )

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Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :Enhancing safety with mobile solutions

Array ( [post_title] => Enhancing safety with mobile solutions [post_content] =>

Enhancing safety with mobile solutions

The goal of enterprise mobility solutions is to network people, plants and systems, using data as efficiently as possible. The use of intrinsically safe smart devices can help improve productivity and the safety of employees, says Dietmaer Deppisch.

The flood of coming from modern production facilities is usually managed by central controls. However, for comprehensive and timely monitoring of processes, data needs to be available closer to the process and more directly – preferably in real time and with low latency. Modern, intrinsically safe (IS) smartphones and tablets can serve as decentralised mini data centers or digital gateways – for example in combination with professional software, sensors, beacons or other smart peripheral devices. The accumulated data can be transferred to the mobile device in real time and evaluated there, with the corresponding applications, at any location and at any time. This solution can help improve productivity and also significantly raises employee safety in hazardous areas.

The right safety level
Employees frequently work alone on the plant floor, outside the range of hearing and vision of their colleagues. They can be exposed to higher risks in their daily work and depend on quick assistance in case of an emergency. If no appropriate safety precautions are taken, injuries, accidents and consequential damage to people and equipment can easily occur. The company must ensure that an accident is detected and the rescue chain is set in motion swiftly. In case of critical hazards it is mandatory to set up a certified lone-worker protection solution (LWP).

Programmable 3D motion sensors can automatically trigger an alarm in the event of a hazard, report the exact location of the incident and document the entire process for later investigation. 

A typical comprehensive lone worker protection system will consist of Personal Alarm Signal Terminals (PAST) just as a mobile phone or wireless device; Personal Alarm Signal System (PASS) (software on server); and connection between the PASS and PAST  via telephone or wireless network. For larger scale lone worker protection solutions mobile devices can easily be integrated into cloud server systems. The Pepperl+Fuchs brand ecom offers such solutions. 

A practical example
A power plant operator in northern Italy offers a good demonstration of the benefits of a lone worker protection solution consisting of mobile devices and specifically for hazardous areas developed Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) beacons. 

The management was looking for a reliable automated system that would help prevent accidents and reduce the time for a potential rescue to an absolute minimum. It chose a solution with ecom's smartphone series Smart-Ex and beacon series Loc-Ex – both certified for use in Zone 1/21 and Division 1. With BLE beacons employees can also be located indoors or be warned of possible hazards in advance. They have an interior range of approximately 10 to 30m and up to 300m in the open field. The signal from the beacon is received by an application on the Smart-Ex smartphone and the distance to the beacon is calculated.

When the mobile worker enters the working area, the location can be read out accurately – even three-dimensionally, i.e. across floors – and forwarded to the control center´s central navigation system. The user is not dependent on an Internet connection, because the mobile devices and applications store the beacon signals locally on the device and send them immediately to update the backend system as soon as access to the company network is available. Compared to other geo-location technologies, this beacon technology offers a high degree of precision and accuracy in all three axes. The position of the mobile worker is stored in the temporary memory of the device and only forwarded to the rescuer in the event of an alarm. It cannot be retrieved either from the device itself or from the outside, from the alarm console in the control center or by subsequent technical analysis. The solution meets all data protection requirements, guarantees the safety of lone workers and, in an emergency, reduces the response times of the rescuers to a minimum.

In another scenario, an oil company commissioned Italian institute L'Istituto di Vigilanza dell'Urbe (IVU) to optimise and secure the refueling of petrol tanks at gas stations. This posed a challenge due to the high safety measures for the refueling process. Delivery and filling, for example, may only be carried out by specialised forwarding agents, under the supervision of a qualified person. The goal was to centralise the monitoring of tank processes in a control center and to implement a comprehensive protection system for lone workers. When selecting and integrating a solution, IVU relied on a specialist systems integrator for radio communication and control rooms. This company designed a complete all-in-one solution employing ecom IS mobile devices.

These mobile devices are equipped with a push-to-talk-over-cellular application. In the event of an accident, rescue workers can be notified immediately via Lone Worker Protection applications. Programmable 3D motion sensors automatically start an SOS request when, for example, the device falls off or no movement is detected. Each work area has been mapped with geofencing so the software detects the GPS position of the worker. This guarantees that an accident is always instantly detected. All SOS requests also activate the hands-free function of the smartphone as well as its camera which allows the control center to assess whether the employee is responsive and of what kind the injuries are. Where previously two people (for example, a truck driver and supervisor) were necessary because of safety requirements, one driver is now sufficient. The supervisor no longer has to be on site, because the devices are monitored continuously (GPS position, battery charge, signal quality, connection status) and entries and exits in a filling station are automatically noted. The control room supervisor will be able to determine, in seconds, whether an alarm is real. It is also possible to document an emergency situation by using recorded voice communication, video streaming, GPS position and event logs. The documentation of the entire rescue chain makes the process evaluable and provides an effective basis for further optimising alert processes.

Dietmar Deppisch is business development manager Applications, ECOM Instruments at Pepperl + Fuchs.

> [post_excerpt] =>

The goal of enterprise mobility solutions is to network people, plants and systems, using data as efficiently as possible. The use of intrinsically safe smart devices can help improve productivity and the safety of employees, says Dietmaer Deppisch. [post_date_gmt] => 2020-02-18 09:35:00 [post_date] => 2020-02-18 09:35:00 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-02-18 09:35:00 [post_modified] => 2020-02-18 09:35:00 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => CEE-176957 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => global/showimage.ashx?Type=Article&ID=184292 image/jpeg ) [syndication_source] => Control Engineering Europe - All Articles [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_source_id] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed_id] => 17 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/rss/article/176957/Enhancing-safety-with-mobile-solutions.aspx [syndication_item_hash] => c2dc5fbc17cb0fd9685937421ce51d30 [faf_process_image] => ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )


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Getting on board with AI technology

Array ( [post_title] => Getting on board with AI technology [post_content] =>

Getting on board with AI technology

It is becoming a reality that technologies such as artificial intelligence (AI) are starting to change the traditional role of the control engineer. Suzanne Gill finds out more about the benefits it can offer engineers as well as the barriers to its adoption in the industrial environment.

According to Jos Martin, senior engineering manager at MathWorks, the biggest impact of AI on control engineering in the coming years will be on the workers themselves. He said: “As demand for data science skills grows and the tech skills gap widens, everyday engineers and scientists, as well as data scientists, will be expected to fill the gap, undergoing training on how to design and deploy machine learning systems to become ‘citizen data scientists’. 

To be able to make the most of AI in their work, engineering professionals will need to possess skills such as the ability to deal with large datasets, build and train AI models and understand how to use new development tools and software. Companies need to support their workers to upskill and be willing to invest in adequate training to make this a reality.”

Hartmut Pütz, president Factory Automation EMEA at Mitsubishi Electric Europe, agrees that AI will affect the control engineering role. He said: “Control engineers will need to change their daily task list. Their role will start to include much more data analysis activities. When users start to implement more self-learning and self-optimising technology in processes a big part of the control engineering objectives will change and this will mean that engineering skillsets will also need to change. I believe that the job profile will become more aligned with that software engineering and data engineering.”  

“In around 10-15 years it is very likely that process optimisation will be handled entirely by AI technologies and the ability to programme PLCs will become much less important. Even today we are seeing PLC programs being generated automatically by higher level systems in the simulation space and then downloaded into the PLC.”

Improving efficiencies
AI algorithms are starting to improve the efficiency of the entire factory production line, reducing energy consumption and waste, enabling organisations to meet important corporate social responsibility targets as well as deliver cost-savings. Traditionally, to achieve good AI accuracy levels and easy training of models, use of high-performance computing systems such as GPUs, clusters and data centres that use 32-bit floating-point math have been vital. However, developments in software tools now mean that AI inference models, which use a range of fixed-point math, can enable engineers to capitalise on devices such as electronic control units and other embedded industrial applications that run on lower power.

AI is helping to improve the accuracy of predictive maintenance applications – such as those for predicting the remaining useful life for an industrial site pump. However, one of the biggest barriers to its adoption in the industrial space is having enough high-quality data to properly train AI models. “Lots of failure data is needed to ensure the AI model is accurate, but it is expensive and inefficient to create data from real, physical equipment. Fortunately, improvements in software now make it easier to recreate data from critical failure conditions and anomalies by generating simulations representing failure behaviour and synthesising it to train a model,” said Martin.

“We are seeing AI being used to transform design in everything from industrial plants to wind turbines to autonomous vehicles to aircraft,” he continued. “However, another barrier to adoption of AI for smart design is the complexity of multi-domain, AI-driven systems. To get around this, engineers are turning to model-based design tools that provide an end-to-end workflow to reduce complexity. These tools can simulate, integrate and continuously test systems, allowing designers to trial ideas in complete context, identify weaknesses in the data and spot flaws in component design before they become a problem.”

Reinforcement learning (RL) – a form of AI famous for beating human players in chess and Go – is also now being employed to improve engineering design. It works by learning to perform a task through repeated trial-and-error interactions within a dynamic environment. Martin predicts that very soon engineers will deploy RL agents into AI models to optimise performance, for example improving response times in an autonomous driving system.

Where and how?
An important question facing industry today is where and how to leverage AI and the data that drives it, to capture as much value as possible.  Andrew McCloskey, chief technology officer, EVP of R&D at AVEVA, believes that this offers a huge opportunity for modern control engineers as when properly implemented AI will make them more effective than ever before, enabling them to implement huge savings for their companies.  “AI-enhanced predictive maintenance of industrial equipment can generate a 10% reduction in annual maintenance costs, up to 20% reduction in downtime and a 25% reduction in inspection costs, said McCloskey. 

Predictive maintenance will leverage both supervised and unsupervised learning – the two primary methods of machine learning that essentially describe the ‘training’ required for artificial intelligence algorithms to ‘get smart’ and provide these savings. Supervised learning enables knowledge transfer from the control engineer in a very short time while unsupervised learning is able to automatically recognise disparities in data that may have significant consequences if left unchecked. Together, these algorithms develop high probability predictions that often are not intuitive or otherwise easily identified. “This frees up more time for the control engineer to take on even bigger challenges and drive a flow of continuous improvement, not just a singular event of improvement,” said McCloskey.  
 
“For example, equipped with predictions of impending failures, it is no longer necessary to perform inspections and maintenance based on a pre-determined time schedule. Instead, we maximise the lifespan of equipment parts and replace them as and when necessary – in this case, just before the impending problem occurs. With tight capital and operating budgets, manufacturers are looking to ‘sweat’ existing assets, and this predictive maintenance approach translates into significant savings in inspection and maintenance costs while keeping unplanned downtime to minimum.”

Conclusion
There can be no denying that the technology is making waves in the control engineering sector but we have learned that AI is not a magic bullet. While there are still barriers to its adoption of the technology, it is vital that industry starts to engage with the technology as the benefits are too great to ignore.

> [post_excerpt] =>

It is becoming a reality that technologies such as artificial intelligence (AI) are starting to change the traditional role of the control engineer. Suzanne Gill finds out more about the benefits it can offer engineers as well as the barriers to its adoption in the industrial environment. [post_date_gmt] => 2020-02-18 09:26:17 [post_date] => 2020-02-18 09:26:17 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-02-18 09:26:17 [post_modified] => 2020-02-18 09:26:17 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => CEE-176956 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => global/showimage.ashx?Type=Article&ID=184290 image/jpeg ) [syndication_source] => Control Engineering Europe - All Articles [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_source_id] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed_id] => 17 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/rss/article/176956/Getting-on-board-with-AI-technology.aspx [syndication_item_hash] => 98bb1983e46c1a1b9f5c6c20ff3c3f45 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

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Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => global/showimage.ashx?Type=Article&ID=184290 image/jpeg ) [syndication_source] => Control Engineering Europe - All Articles [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_source_id] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed_id] => 17 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/rss/article/176956/Getting-on-board-with-AI-technology.aspx [syndication_item_hash] => 98bb1983e46c1a1b9f5c6c20ff3c3f45 )

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Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :Getting on board with AI technology

Array ( [post_title] => Getting on board with AI technology [post_content] =>

Getting on board with AI technology

It is becoming a reality that technologies such as artificial intelligence (AI) are starting to change the traditional role of the control engineer. Suzanne Gill finds out more about the benefits it can offer engineers as well as the barriers to its adoption in the industrial environment.

According to Jos Martin, senior engineering manager at MathWorks, the biggest impact of AI on control engineering in the coming years will be on the workers themselves. He said: “As demand for data science skills grows and the tech skills gap widens, everyday engineers and scientists, as well as data scientists, will be expected to fill the gap, undergoing training on how to design and deploy machine learning systems to become ‘citizen data scientists’. 

To be able to make the most of AI in their work, engineering professionals will need to possess skills such as the ability to deal with large datasets, build and train AI models and understand how to use new development tools and software. Companies need to support their workers to upskill and be willing to invest in adequate training to make this a reality.”

Hartmut Pütz, president Factory Automation EMEA at Mitsubishi Electric Europe, agrees that AI will affect the control engineering role. He said: “Control engineers will need to change their daily task list. Their role will start to include much more data analysis activities. When users start to implement more self-learning and self-optimising technology in processes a big part of the control engineering objectives will change and this will mean that engineering skillsets will also need to change. I believe that the job profile will become more aligned with that software engineering and data engineering.”  

“In around 10-15 years it is very likely that process optimisation will be handled entirely by AI technologies and the ability to programme PLCs will become much less important. Even today we are seeing PLC programs being generated automatically by higher level systems in the simulation space and then downloaded into the PLC.”

Improving efficiencies
AI algorithms are starting to improve the efficiency of the entire factory production line, reducing energy consumption and waste, enabling organisations to meet important corporate social responsibility targets as well as deliver cost-savings. Traditionally, to achieve good AI accuracy levels and easy training of models, use of high-performance computing systems such as GPUs, clusters and data centres that use 32-bit floating-point math have been vital. However, developments in software tools now mean that AI inference models, which use a range of fixed-point math, can enable engineers to capitalise on devices such as electronic control units and other embedded industrial applications that run on lower power.

AI is helping to improve the accuracy of predictive maintenance applications – such as those for predicting the remaining useful life for an industrial site pump. However, one of the biggest barriers to its adoption in the industrial space is having enough high-quality data to properly train AI models. “Lots of failure data is needed to ensure the AI model is accurate, but it is expensive and inefficient to create data from real, physical equipment. Fortunately, improvements in software now make it easier to recreate data from critical failure conditions and anomalies by generating simulations representing failure behaviour and synthesising it to train a model,” said Martin.

“We are seeing AI being used to transform design in everything from industrial plants to wind turbines to autonomous vehicles to aircraft,” he continued. “However, another barrier to adoption of AI for smart design is the complexity of multi-domain, AI-driven systems. To get around this, engineers are turning to model-based design tools that provide an end-to-end workflow to reduce complexity. These tools can simulate, integrate and continuously test systems, allowing designers to trial ideas in complete context, identify weaknesses in the data and spot flaws in component design before they become a problem.”

Reinforcement learning (RL) – a form of AI famous for beating human players in chess and Go – is also now being employed to improve engineering design. It works by learning to perform a task through repeated trial-and-error interactions within a dynamic environment. Martin predicts that very soon engineers will deploy RL agents into AI models to optimise performance, for example improving response times in an autonomous driving system.

Where and how?
An important question facing industry today is where and how to leverage AI and the data that drives it, to capture as much value as possible.  Andrew McCloskey, chief technology officer, EVP of R&D at AVEVA, believes that this offers a huge opportunity for modern control engineers as when properly implemented AI will make them more effective than ever before, enabling them to implement huge savings for their companies.  “AI-enhanced predictive maintenance of industrial equipment can generate a 10% reduction in annual maintenance costs, up to 20% reduction in downtime and a 25% reduction in inspection costs, said McCloskey. 

Predictive maintenance will leverage both supervised and unsupervised learning – the two primary methods of machine learning that essentially describe the ‘training’ required for artificial intelligence algorithms to ‘get smart’ and provide these savings. Supervised learning enables knowledge transfer from the control engineer in a very short time while unsupervised learning is able to automatically recognise disparities in data that may have significant consequences if left unchecked. Together, these algorithms develop high probability predictions that often are not intuitive or otherwise easily identified. “This frees up more time for the control engineer to take on even bigger challenges and drive a flow of continuous improvement, not just a singular event of improvement,” said McCloskey.  
 
“For example, equipped with predictions of impending failures, it is no longer necessary to perform inspections and maintenance based on a pre-determined time schedule. Instead, we maximise the lifespan of equipment parts and replace them as and when necessary – in this case, just before the impending problem occurs. With tight capital and operating budgets, manufacturers are looking to ‘sweat’ existing assets, and this predictive maintenance approach translates into significant savings in inspection and maintenance costs while keeping unplanned downtime to minimum.”

Conclusion
There can be no denying that the technology is making waves in the control engineering sector but we have learned that AI is not a magic bullet. While there are still barriers to its adoption of the technology, it is vital that industry starts to engage with the technology as the benefits are too great to ignore.

> [post_excerpt] =>

It is becoming a reality that technologies such as artificial intelligence (AI) are starting to change the traditional role of the control engineer. Suzanne Gill finds out more about the benefits it can offer engineers as well as the barriers to its adoption in the industrial environment. [post_date_gmt] => 2020-02-18 09:26:17 [post_date] => 2020-02-18 09:26:17 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-02-18 09:26:17 [post_modified] => 2020-02-18 09:26:17 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => CEE-176956 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => global/showimage.ashx?Type=Article&ID=184290 image/jpeg ) [syndication_source] => Control Engineering Europe - All Articles [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_source_id] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed_id] => 17 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/rss/article/176956/Getting-on-board-with-AI-technology.aspx [syndication_item_hash] => 98bb1983e46c1a1b9f5c6c20ff3c3f45 [faf_process_image] => ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )


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Next-generation industrial firewall

Array ( [post_title] => Next-generation industrial firewall [post_content] =>

Next-generation industrial firewall

The Hirschmann EAGLE40 Next-Generation Firewall aims to offer optimal cybersecurity to industrial and process automation systems by hardening networks at the factory floor.

With multiport configuration, the ruggedised EAGLE40 is designed to support maximum data throughput, without compromising network performance or uptime. These features, along with future software updates, are said to make this firewall the most economically-sound solution for reliable protection against the evolving cyber landscape.

Benefits of the system are said to include heightened performance and security, including more port options with increased bandwidth and encryption capabilities. A comprehensive graphical user interface, firewall learning mode and deep packet inspection (DPI) modules cater for all skill levels.

> [post_excerpt] =>

The Hirschmann EAGLE40 Next-Generation Firewall aims to offer optimal cybersecurity to industrial and process automation systems by hardening networks at the factory floor. [post_date_gmt] => 2020-02-18 09:19:14 [post_date] => 2020-02-18 09:19:14 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-02-18 09:19:14 [post_modified] => 2020-02-18 09:19:14 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => CEE-176954 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => global/showimage.ashx?Type=Article&ID=184289 image/jpeg ) [syndication_source] => Control Engineering Europe - All Articles [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_source_id] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed_id] => 17 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/rss/article/176954/Next-generation-industrial-firewall.aspx [syndication_item_hash] => a7ad3ef66bbe7a64eb1ec319d0c9637e ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

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Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :Next-generation industrial firewall

Array ( [post_title] => Next-generation industrial firewall [post_content] =>

Next-generation industrial firewall

The Hirschmann EAGLE40 Next-Generation Firewall aims to offer optimal cybersecurity to industrial and process automation systems by hardening networks at the factory floor.

With multiport configuration, the ruggedised EAGLE40 is designed to support maximum data throughput, without compromising network performance or uptime. These features, along with future software updates, are said to make this firewall the most economically-sound solution for reliable protection against the evolving cyber landscape.

Benefits of the system are said to include heightened performance and security, including more port options with increased bandwidth and encryption capabilities. A comprehensive graphical user interface, firewall learning mode and deep packet inspection (DPI) modules cater for all skill levels.

> [post_excerpt] =>

The Hirschmann EAGLE40 Next-Generation Firewall aims to offer optimal cybersecurity to industrial and process automation systems by hardening networks at the factory floor. [post_date_gmt] => 2020-02-18 09:19:14 [post_date] => 2020-02-18 09:19:14 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-02-18 09:19:14 [post_modified] => 2020-02-18 09:19:14 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => CEE-176954 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => global/showimage.ashx?Type=Article&ID=184289 image/jpeg ) [syndication_source] => Control Engineering Europe - All Articles [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_source_id] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed_id] => 17 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/rss/article/176954/Next-generation-industrial-firewall.aspx [syndication_item_hash] => a7ad3ef66bbe7a64eb1ec319d0c9637e [faf_process_image] => ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )


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Spend on simulation software grows as use cases prove its benefits

Array ( [post_title] => Spend on simulation software grows as use cases prove its benefits [post_content] =>

Spend on simulation software grows as use cases prove its benefits

Traditionally, simulation software was only been employed to tweak production lines. Today, however, it is being utilised to test new concepts, accelerate product development, and demonstrate regulatory compliance, according to a new report from ABI Research, enititled ‘Industrial Simulation Use Cases: How Simulation Software Benefits Manufacturers’ Operations application analysis report.’

Investment in simulation software only tends to occur when there is uncertainty about making changes to a production line or when building a brand-new line is too expensive. That is because downtime is so costly in terms of operational efficiencies. “New use cases have now proven that by investing in simulation software, manufacturers can identify and solve issues in advance. Simulation software can also be used to simulate how components work together in creating new products and simulating process flows to demonstrate compliance,” explained Michael Larner, principal analyst at ABI Research.

Notable use cases for simulation software include AnyLogic helping General Dynamic (NASSCO) improve its handling of the thousands of parts flowing though its shipyards and Siemens modelling Electrolux’s factories to identify operational efficiencies. Dassault Systèmes is helping Global Trailers accelerate the processes for bringing new trailers to market. At the same time, AspenTech developed a solution for Fluor, an engineering and construction firm, to demonstrate that its sulfur tracking technologies help gas plants meet environmental requirements.

The more complex the production line and the engineering process, the greater the demand for simulation software. “Testing in the digital world before going live on the factory floor becomes critical when mistakes are possible and expensive to rectify,” continued Larner.

It appears that manufacturers are taking note and it is expected that the global total for the number of simulation software users will grow from 60,000 in 2018, to 110,000 at the end of2025, and 172,000 at the end of 2030.

“The strongest argument for simulation software is about ROI. The financial and reputational costs associated with a failure on the production line can be catastrophic,” concluded Larner.

> [post_excerpt] =>

Traditionally, simulation software was only been employed to tweak production lines. Today, however, it is being utilised to test new concepts, accelerate product development, and demonstrate regulatory compliance, according to a new report from ABI Research, enititled ‘Industrial Simulation Use Cases: How Simulation Software Benefits Manufacturers’ Operations application analysis report.’ [post_date_gmt] => 2020-02-18 09:09:46 [post_date] => 2020-02-18 09:09:46 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-02-18 09:09:46 [post_modified] => 2020-02-18 09:09:46 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => CEE-176953 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => global/showimage.ashx?Type=Article&ID=184288 image/jpeg ) [syndication_source] => Control Engineering Europe - All Articles [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_source_id] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed_id] => 17 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/rss/article/176953/Spend-on-simulation-software-grows-as-use-cases-prove-its-benefits.aspx [syndication_item_hash] => f9323a8c54a4f1e12f64ea32e0a30a78 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

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Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :Spend on simulation software grows as use cases prove its benefits

Array ( [post_title] => Spend on simulation software grows as use cases prove its benefits [post_content] =>

Spend on simulation software grows as use cases prove its benefits

Traditionally, simulation software was only been employed to tweak production lines. Today, however, it is being utilised to test new concepts, accelerate product development, and demonstrate regulatory compliance, according to a new report from ABI Research, enititled ‘Industrial Simulation Use Cases: How Simulation Software Benefits Manufacturers’ Operations application analysis report.’

Investment in simulation software only tends to occur when there is uncertainty about making changes to a production line or when building a brand-new line is too expensive. That is because downtime is so costly in terms of operational efficiencies. “New use cases have now proven that by investing in simulation software, manufacturers can identify and solve issues in advance. Simulation software can also be used to simulate how components work together in creating new products and simulating process flows to demonstrate compliance,” explained Michael Larner, principal analyst at ABI Research.

Notable use cases for simulation software include AnyLogic helping General Dynamic (NASSCO) improve its handling of the thousands of parts flowing though its shipyards and Siemens modelling Electrolux’s factories to identify operational efficiencies. Dassault Systèmes is helping Global Trailers accelerate the processes for bringing new trailers to market. At the same time, AspenTech developed a solution for Fluor, an engineering and construction firm, to demonstrate that its sulfur tracking technologies help gas plants meet environmental requirements.

The more complex the production line and the engineering process, the greater the demand for simulation software. “Testing in the digital world before going live on the factory floor becomes critical when mistakes are possible and expensive to rectify,” continued Larner.

It appears that manufacturers are taking note and it is expected that the global total for the number of simulation software users will grow from 60,000 in 2018, to 110,000 at the end of2025, and 172,000 at the end of 2030.

“The strongest argument for simulation software is about ROI. The financial and reputational costs associated with a failure on the production line can be catastrophic,” concluded Larner.

> [post_excerpt] =>

Traditionally, simulation software was only been employed to tweak production lines. Today, however, it is being utilised to test new concepts, accelerate product development, and demonstrate regulatory compliance, according to a new report from ABI Research, enititled ‘Industrial Simulation Use Cases: How Simulation Software Benefits Manufacturers’ Operations application analysis report.’ [post_date_gmt] => 2020-02-18 09:09:46 [post_date] => 2020-02-18 09:09:46 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-02-18 09:09:46 [post_modified] => 2020-02-18 09:09:46 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => CEE-176953 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => global/showimage.ashx?Type=Article&ID=184288 image/jpeg ) [syndication_source] => Control Engineering Europe - All Articles [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_source_id] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed_id] => 17 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/rss/article/176953/Spend-on-simulation-software-grows-as-use-cases-prove-its-benefits.aspx [syndication_item_hash] => f9323a8c54a4f1e12f64ea32e0a30a78 [faf_process_image] => ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )


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FAF deciding on filters on post to be syndicated:

Mobile training truck features latest products

Array ( [post_title] => Mobile training truck features latest products [post_content] =>

Mobile training truck features latest products

Touring the UK from 17th February to 20th of March, the impressive VEGA training truck is more than just a mobile exhibition. Virtually all the VEGA portfolio of products are represented and working on board - as well as latest generation low-cost devices for radar level, process pressure switches and point level, and you can get hands on all of them, click here for dates and locations.

> [post_excerpt] =>

Touring the UK from 17th February to 20th of March, the impressive VEGA training truck is more than just a mobile exhibition. Virtually all the VEGA portfolio of products are represented and working on board - as well as latest generation low-cost devices for radar level, process pressure switches and point level, and you can get hands on all of them, click here for dates and locations. [post_date_gmt] => 2020-02-18 08:59:14 [post_date] => 2020-02-18 08:59:14 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-02-18 08:59:14 [post_modified] => 2020-02-18 08:59:14 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => CEE-176952 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => global/showimage.ashx?Type=Article&ID=184287 image/jpeg ) [syndication_source] => Control Engineering Europe - All Articles [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_source_id] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed_id] => 17 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/rss/article/176952/Mobile-training-truck-features-latest-products.aspx [syndication_item_hash] => e4f605bba4f3b5eae855b05cb96ff81c ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

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Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => global/showimage.ashx?Type=Article&ID=184287 image/jpeg ) [syndication_source] => Control Engineering Europe - All Articles [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_source_id] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed_id] => 17 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/rss/article/176952/Mobile-training-truck-features-latest-products.aspx [syndication_item_hash] => e4f605bba4f3b5eae855b05cb96ff81c )

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Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :Mobile training truck features latest products

Array ( [post_title] => Mobile training truck features latest products [post_content] =>

Mobile training truck features latest products

Touring the UK from 17th February to 20th of March, the impressive VEGA training truck is more than just a mobile exhibition. Virtually all the VEGA portfolio of products are represented and working on board - as well as latest generation low-cost devices for radar level, process pressure switches and point level, and you can get hands on all of them, click here for dates and locations.

> [post_excerpt] =>

Touring the UK from 17th February to 20th of March, the impressive VEGA training truck is more than just a mobile exhibition. Virtually all the VEGA portfolio of products are represented and working on board - as well as latest generation low-cost devices for radar level, process pressure switches and point level, and you can get hands on all of them, click here for dates and locations. [post_date_gmt] => 2020-02-18 08:59:14 [post_date] => 2020-02-18 08:59:14 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-02-18 08:59:14 [post_modified] => 2020-02-18 08:59:14 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => CEE-176952 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => global/showimage.ashx?Type=Article&ID=184287 image/jpeg ) [syndication_source] => Control Engineering Europe - All Articles [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_source_id] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed_id] => 17 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/rss/article/176952/Mobile-training-truck-features-latest-products.aspx [syndication_item_hash] => e4f605bba4f3b5eae855b05cb96ff81c [faf_process_image] => ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )


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FAF deciding on filters on post to be syndicated:

RDS delivering more power for industrial computing with AAEON’s Boxer-6641

Array ( [post_title] => RDS delivering more power for industrial computing with AAEON’s Boxer-6641 [post_content] =>

RDS delivering more power for industrial computing with AAEON’s Boxer-6641

Now available from RDS is the latest fanless box PC from AAEON, the Boxer-6641, which is currently the most powerful fanless industrial system on the market. It has been designed to easily integrate into a range of industrial applications including factory automation and machine vision and has several key features to ensure reliable operation in harsh industrial environments.

Featuring 8th Generation Intel®Core™ and Xeon® processors it is available with two chipsets, the H310 (BOXER-6641-A1) and C246 (BOXER-6641-A2). The system offers a range of processors from the 8th Generation Intel®Core™ and Xeon® processor family, from Celeron® G4900T and Pentium®G5400T up to Xeon® E-2124G (up to 71W). All combined with up to 32GB of ECC or non-ECC DDR4 2666MHz RAM and support for two hard drives. 

I/O features include six COM ports and up to eight USB 3.2 Gen 1 ports (A2 model). The BOXER-6641 also comes with four Intel® Gigabit Ethernet ports, including one Intel® i219 chipset, with built-in support for Intel® vPRO and Active Management Technology (Intel® AMT) available on BOXER-6641-A2. The BOXER-6641 is expandable with two mPCIe slots, capable of supporting AI applications with solutions such as AAEON’s AI Core X with Intel Movidius Myriad X VPU.

In addition to fanless construction, the BOXER-6641 offers wide voltage input of 10V to 35V, wide operating temperature range from -20°C to 55°C (-20°C to 45°C with 71W processor), and an all-metal chassis. It is also easy to maintain, with only six screws needed to remove the top heatsink to access the CPU, and removing the bottom panel provides easy access to the memory and storage devices.

RDS can design and build complete system to your specifications. Have a project? Talk to us on 01959 563345 or go to www.review-displays.co.uk

> [post_excerpt] =>

Now available from RDS is the latest fanless box PC from AAEON, the Boxer-6641, which is currently the most powerful fanless industrial system on the market. It has been designed to easily integrate into a range of industrial applications including factory automation and machine vision and has several key features to ensure reliable operation in harsh industrial environments. [post_date_gmt] => 2020-02-18 08:54:54 [post_date] => 2020-02-18 08:54:54 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-02-18 08:54:54 [post_modified] => 2020-02-18 08:54:54 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => CEE-176951 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => global/showimage.ashx?Type=Article&ID=184286 image/jpeg ) [syndication_source] => Control Engineering Europe - All Articles [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_source_id] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed_id] => 17 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/rss/article/176951/RDS-delivering-more-power-for-industrial-computing-with-AAEON-s-Boxer-6641.aspx [syndication_item_hash] => 2d392e017cc49d13919707aa66bbc7f8 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

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Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => global/showimage.ashx?Type=Article&ID=184286 image/jpeg ) [syndication_source] => Control Engineering Europe - All Articles [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_source_id] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed_id] => 17 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/rss/article/176951/RDS-delivering-more-power-for-industrial-computing-with-AAEON-s-Boxer-6641.aspx [syndication_item_hash] => 2d392e017cc49d13919707aa66bbc7f8 )

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Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :RDS delivering more power for industrial computing with AAEON’s Boxer-6641

Array ( [post_title] => RDS delivering more power for industrial computing with AAEON’s Boxer-6641 [post_content] =>

RDS delivering more power for industrial computing with AAEON’s Boxer-6641

Now available from RDS is the latest fanless box PC from AAEON, the Boxer-6641, which is currently the most powerful fanless industrial system on the market. It has been designed to easily integrate into a range of industrial applications including factory automation and machine vision and has several key features to ensure reliable operation in harsh industrial environments.

Featuring 8th Generation Intel®Core™ and Xeon® processors it is available with two chipsets, the H310 (BOXER-6641-A1) and C246 (BOXER-6641-A2). The system offers a range of processors from the 8th Generation Intel®Core™ and Xeon® processor family, from Celeron® G4900T and Pentium®G5400T up to Xeon® E-2124G (up to 71W). All combined with up to 32GB of ECC or non-ECC DDR4 2666MHz RAM and support for two hard drives. 

I/O features include six COM ports and up to eight USB 3.2 Gen 1 ports (A2 model). The BOXER-6641 also comes with four Intel® Gigabit Ethernet ports, including one Intel® i219 chipset, with built-in support for Intel® vPRO and Active Management Technology (Intel® AMT) available on BOXER-6641-A2. The BOXER-6641 is expandable with two mPCIe slots, capable of supporting AI applications with solutions such as AAEON’s AI Core X with Intel Movidius Myriad X VPU.

In addition to fanless construction, the BOXER-6641 offers wide voltage input of 10V to 35V, wide operating temperature range from -20°C to 55°C (-20°C to 45°C with 71W processor), and an all-metal chassis. It is also easy to maintain, with only six screws needed to remove the top heatsink to access the CPU, and removing the bottom panel provides easy access to the memory and storage devices.

RDS can design and build complete system to your specifications. Have a project? Talk to us on 01959 563345 or go to www.review-displays.co.uk

> [post_excerpt] =>

Now available from RDS is the latest fanless box PC from AAEON, the Boxer-6641, which is currently the most powerful fanless industrial system on the market. It has been designed to easily integrate into a range of industrial applications including factory automation and machine vision and has several key features to ensure reliable operation in harsh industrial environments. [post_date_gmt] => 2020-02-18 08:54:54 [post_date] => 2020-02-18 08:54:54 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-02-18 08:54:54 [post_modified] => 2020-02-18 08:54:54 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => CEE-176951 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => global/showimage.ashx?Type=Article&ID=184286 image/jpeg ) [syndication_source] => Control Engineering Europe - All Articles [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_source_id] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed_id] => 17 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/rss/article/176951/RDS-delivering-more-power-for-industrial-computing-with-AAEON-s-Boxer-6641.aspx [syndication_item_hash] => 2d392e017cc49d13919707aa66bbc7f8 [faf_process_image] => ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )


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PLC gains a virtual HMI

Array ( [post_title] => PLC gains a virtual HMI [post_content] =>

PLC gains a virtual HMI

The UniStream PLC is a multi-function controller from Unitronics that offers communication support and introduces the concept of a virtual HMI whereby the PLC stores and runs the program logic as well as the HMI user application within the PLC itself. This allows users to view and operate a machine or to access it remotely.

The controller has built-in I/Os that can be expanded to more than 2,000 I/Os including digital, analogue high-speed and temperature, as well as communication modules supporting Modbus, Ethernet/IP, MQTT, SQL, SNMP, and others.

> [post_excerpt] =>

The UniStream PLC is a multi-function controller from Unitronics that offers communication support and introduces the concept of a virtual HMI whereby the PLC stores and runs the program logic as well as the HMI user application within the PLC itself. This allows users to view and operate a machine or to access it remotely. [post_date_gmt] => 2020-02-17 17:42:37 [post_date] => 2020-02-17 17:42:37 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-02-17 17:42:37 [post_modified] => 2020-02-17 17:42:37 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => CEE-176950 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => global/showimage.ashx?Type=Article&ID=184285 image/jpeg ) [syndication_source] => Control Engineering Europe - All Articles [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_source_id] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed_id] => 17 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/rss/article/176950/PLC-gains-a-virtual-HMI.aspx [syndication_item_hash] => ada94c64f52a7739ec2b26da3b4f0b0b ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

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Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => global/showimage.ashx?Type=Article&ID=184285 image/jpeg ) [syndication_source] => Control Engineering Europe - All Articles [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_source_id] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed_id] => 17 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/rss/article/176950/PLC-gains-a-virtual-HMI.aspx [syndication_item_hash] => ada94c64f52a7739ec2b26da3b4f0b0b )

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Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :PLC gains a virtual HMI

Array ( [post_title] => PLC gains a virtual HMI [post_content] =>

PLC gains a virtual HMI

The UniStream PLC is a multi-function controller from Unitronics that offers communication support and introduces the concept of a virtual HMI whereby the PLC stores and runs the program logic as well as the HMI user application within the PLC itself. This allows users to view and operate a machine or to access it remotely.

The controller has built-in I/Os that can be expanded to more than 2,000 I/Os including digital, analogue high-speed and temperature, as well as communication modules supporting Modbus, Ethernet/IP, MQTT, SQL, SNMP, and others.

> [post_excerpt] =>

The UniStream PLC is a multi-function controller from Unitronics that offers communication support and introduces the concept of a virtual HMI whereby the PLC stores and runs the program logic as well as the HMI user application within the PLC itself. This allows users to view and operate a machine or to access it remotely. [post_date_gmt] => 2020-02-17 17:42:37 [post_date] => 2020-02-17 17:42:37 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-02-17 17:42:37 [post_modified] => 2020-02-17 17:42:37 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => CEE-176950 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => global/showimage.ashx?Type=Article&ID=184285 image/jpeg ) [syndication_source] => Control Engineering Europe - All Articles [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_source_id] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed_id] => 17 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/rss/article/176950/PLC-gains-a-virtual-HMI.aspx [syndication_item_hash] => ada94c64f52a7739ec2b26da3b4f0b0b [faf_process_image] => ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )


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FAF deciding on filters on post to be syndicated:

Food Processing Awards 2020: nominations are open!

Array ( [post_title] => Food Processing Awards 2020: nominations are open! [post_content] =>

Food Processing Awards 2020: nominations are open!

Nominations are now open for entry into the annual Food Processing Awards, which acknowledge and engineering excellence and innovation in the food and beverage processing sector. This year the award ceremony will be held at the DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel in Coventry on the evening of the annual Appetite for Engineering event on 15th October. 

The Food Processing Awards 2020 categories are: 

• Robotics & Automation 
• Lean / Continuous Improvement 
• Young Engineer of the Year 
• Lifetime Achievement 
• Hygiene & Food Safety 
• Process & Packaging 
• Skills & Development 
• Smart / Digital Technology 
• Environmental / Sustainability 

Nominating a company or person is easy. You can nominate your own company; you can nominate an innovative product that was developed to solve a food processing issue; or you could nominate a food industry engineering project that incorporates automation technology and has helped solve a problem. 

Nominations need to include the following information: 
 
• Contact name, address, phone number and email of nominee and category. 
• Details about the nominated product/application/technology/person. (and high-resolution image where possible).
• Brief statement about the potential impact of the nomination for the food and beverage processing sector
• Brief evidence or customer recommendations about the benefits – if applicable. 

Nominations should be sent to the editor of Food Processing – Suzanne.gill@imlgroup.co.uk – before 22nd June. After this date the final nominations will be presented to the readers of Food Processing for consideration.

Last year’s winners included Bakkavör’s apprenticeship programmes, which have been designed to develop the skills of young engineering talent who want to embark on a new career in food manufacturing while working towards a nationally recognised qualification. 

Winner of the Process & Packaging Award was the Hygienic eXtended Transport System (XTS) from Beckhoff Automation is a linear motion technology that offers a high degree of design freedom and reduces maintenance requirements, while igus UK scooped the Robotics & Automation Award with its robolink DCi, a cost-effective robotic arm solution for the food industry which offers the benefits of flexibility for picking and packing applications. The robotic arm is suited to use in lifting applications. It can handle items weighing up to 1kg with an accuracy of ±0.5mm and it can be installed and commissioned without the need for any prior robotics experience. 

> [post_excerpt] =>

Nominations are now open for entry into the annual Food Processing Awards, which acknowledge and engineering excellence and innovation in the food and beverage processing sector. This year the award ceremony will be held at the DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel in Coventry on the evening of the annual Appetite for Engineering event on 15th October.  [post_date_gmt] => 2020-02-17 17:19:28 [post_date] => 2020-02-17 17:19:28 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-02-17 17:19:28 [post_modified] => 2020-02-17 17:19:28 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => CEE-176949 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => global/showimage.ashx?Type=Article&ID=184284 image/jpeg ) [syndication_source] => Control Engineering Europe - All Articles [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_source_id] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed_id] => 17 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/rss/article/176949/Food-Processing-Awards-2020--nominations-are-open-.aspx [syndication_item_hash] => b8c66c94c70521d8d4664b0d066bf91c ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

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Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => global/showimage.ashx?Type=Article&ID=184284 image/jpeg ) [syndication_source] => Control Engineering Europe - All Articles [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_source_id] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed_id] => 17 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/rss/article/176949/Food-Processing-Awards-2020--nominations-are-open-.aspx [syndication_item_hash] => b8c66c94c70521d8d4664b0d066bf91c )

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Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :Food Processing Awards 2020: nominations are open!

Array ( [post_title] => Food Processing Awards 2020: nominations are open! [post_content] =>

Food Processing Awards 2020: nominations are open!

Nominations are now open for entry into the annual Food Processing Awards, which acknowledge and engineering excellence and innovation in the food and beverage processing sector. This year the award ceremony will be held at the DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel in Coventry on the evening of the annual Appetite for Engineering event on 15th October. 

The Food Processing Awards 2020 categories are: 

• Robotics & Automation 
• Lean / Continuous Improvement 
• Young Engineer of the Year 
• Lifetime Achievement 
• Hygiene & Food Safety 
• Process & Packaging 
• Skills & Development 
• Smart / Digital Technology 
• Environmental / Sustainability 

Nominating a company or person is easy. You can nominate your own company; you can nominate an innovative product that was developed to solve a food processing issue; or you could nominate a food industry engineering project that incorporates automation technology and has helped solve a problem. 

Nominations need to include the following information: 
 
• Contact name, address, phone number and email of nominee and category. 
• Details about the nominated product/application/technology/person. (and high-resolution image where possible).
• Brief statement about the potential impact of the nomination for the food and beverage processing sector
• Brief evidence or customer recommendations about the benefits – if applicable. 

Nominations should be sent to the editor of Food Processing – Suzanne.gill@imlgroup.co.uk – before 22nd June. After this date the final nominations will be presented to the readers of Food Processing for consideration.

Last year’s winners included Bakkavör’s apprenticeship programmes, which have been designed to develop the skills of young engineering talent who want to embark on a new career in food manufacturing while working towards a nationally recognised qualification. 

Winner of the Process & Packaging Award was the Hygienic eXtended Transport System (XTS) from Beckhoff Automation is a linear motion technology that offers a high degree of design freedom and reduces maintenance requirements, while igus UK scooped the Robotics & Automation Award with its robolink DCi, a cost-effective robotic arm solution for the food industry which offers the benefits of flexibility for picking and packing applications. The robotic arm is suited to use in lifting applications. It can handle items weighing up to 1kg with an accuracy of ±0.5mm and it can be installed and commissioned without the need for any prior robotics experience. 

> [post_excerpt] =>

Nominations are now open for entry into the annual Food Processing Awards, which acknowledge and engineering excellence and innovation in the food and beverage processing sector. This year the award ceremony will be held at the DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel in Coventry on the evening of the annual Appetite for Engineering event on 15th October.  [post_date_gmt] => 2020-02-17 17:19:28 [post_date] => 2020-02-17 17:19:28 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-02-17 17:19:28 [post_modified] => 2020-02-17 17:19:28 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => CEE-176949 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => global/showimage.ashx?Type=Article&ID=184284 image/jpeg ) [syndication_source] => Control Engineering Europe - All Articles [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_source_id] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed_id] => 17 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/rss/article/176949/Food-Processing-Awards-2020--nominations-are-open-.aspx [syndication_item_hash] => b8c66c94c70521d8d4664b0d066bf91c [faf_process_image] => ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )


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FAF deciding on filters on post to be syndicated:

Valentine’s Day packaging we love

Array ( [post_title] => Valentine’s Day packaging we love [post_content] =>

Just try not to fall in love with these fun and festive seasonal Valentine’s Day snack packages. From the intimacy of personalization to classic hearts, Valentine’s Day packaging aims to get that special someone’s attention.

Packaging Digest showcased these 16 packages at the recent WestPack 2020 in The Snack Shack experiential exhibit. Click the "View Gallery" button at the bottom right of the image above.

[post_excerpt] => Just try not to fall in love with these fun and festive seasonal Valentine’s Day snack packages. From the intimacy of personalization to classic hearts, Valentine’s Day packaging aims to get that special someone’s attention.Packaging Digest showcased t... [post_date_gmt] => 2020-02-14 06:17:10 [post_date] => 2020-02-14 06:17:10 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-02-14 06:17:10 [post_modified] => 2020-02-14 06:17:10 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => 29349 at https://www.packagingdigest.com [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Packaging Digest [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.packagingdigest.com [syndication_source_id] => http://www.packagingdigest.com/rss.xml [syndication_feed] => http://www.packagingdigest.com/rss.xml [syndication_feed_id] => 109 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.packagingdigest.com/packaging-design/valentines-day-packaging-we-love-2020-02-13 [syndication_item_hash] => ad2b820d1c517e6977723b64990bcced ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 8266 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

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Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Packaging Digest [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.packagingdigest.com [syndication_source_id] => http://www.packagingdigest.com/rss.xml [syndication_feed] => http://www.packagingdigest.com/rss.xml [syndication_feed_id] => 109 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.packagingdigest.com/packaging-design/valentines-day-packaging-we-love-2020-02-13 [syndication_item_hash] => ad2b820d1c517e6977723b64990bcced )

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Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :Valentine’s Day packaging we love

Array ( [post_title] => Valentine’s Day packaging we love [post_content] =>

Just try not to fall in love with these fun and festive seasonal Valentine’s Day snack packages. From the intimacy of personalization to classic hearts, Valentine’s Day packaging aims to get that special someone’s attention.

Packaging Digest showcased these 16 packages at the recent WestPack 2020 in The Snack Shack experiential exhibit. Click the "View Gallery" button at the bottom right of the image above.

[post_excerpt] => Just try not to fall in love with these fun and festive seasonal Valentine’s Day snack packages. From the intimacy of personalization to classic hearts, Valentine’s Day packaging aims to get that special someone’s attention.Packaging Digest showcased t... [post_date_gmt] => 2020-02-14 06:17:10 [post_date] => 2020-02-14 06:17:10 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-02-14 06:17:10 [post_modified] => 2020-02-14 06:17:10 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => 29349 at https://www.packagingdigest.com [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Packaging Digest [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.packagingdigest.com [syndication_source_id] => http://www.packagingdigest.com/rss.xml [syndication_feed] => http://www.packagingdigest.com/rss.xml [syndication_feed_id] => 109 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.packagingdigest.com/packaging-design/valentines-day-packaging-we-love-2020-02-13 [syndication_item_hash] => ad2b820d1c517e6977723b64990bcced [faf_process_image] => ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 8266 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

FAF deciding on filters on post to be syndicated:

Create packaging that inspires love at first sight

Array ( [post_title] => Create packaging that inspires love at first sight [post_content] =>

“Love at first sight”—cliché for sure, but in a packaging sense, I would go so far as to call it the kind of first impression brands dream of.

Making this a reality, however, requires a pivot in how brands conceptualize a package. From first sketch to first impression, it requires brands to think like a matchmaker. Because an optimal packaging strategy is really one that matches brand identity with the function of packaging.

Smartphone packaging is a perfect example of this—the packaging fits in the palm of your hand like the product inside. Crisp, perfect edges convey a look and feel that’s both high-end and familiar in the tech space. Smartphone packaging delivers a sensory experience that many consider second to none.

Love-at-first-sight packaging doesn’t have to be left to chance—or something only large smartphone manufacturers can achieve.

Remember, packaging is the only form of marketing that connects with every one of your consumers, regardless of the buying channel. To bring brand and function together effectively in a package’s design, I encourage you to play Cupid. Here are six ways to do just that:

 

1. Test smarter (and faster)

Smaller-run market tests provide companies an efficient, low-risk opportunity to test a variety of packaging combinations—structure, shape, graphics, material, messaging.

Through short runs, brands are able to create prototypes faster and, ultimately, observe how a package might look and perform in the marketplace. This also shortens the initial feedback loop and optimizes production costs by providing targeted clues that help redirect a package’s design for better results.

In the end, a brand is able to put a package on store shelves or door steps that will best appeal to its customers, drive sales, and deepen the brand connection.

 

2. Personalize the experience through variability

There’s no denying, one-to-one personalization can bring a brand closer to its customer. But personalization in a broader, more mass-produced sense may also strike a chord. Consider an approach that takes a few steps back and tailors a package for larger targets (instead of trying to tailor to each individual consumer).

For example, Snickers’ “You're Not You When You're Hungry" campaign replaced the iconic parallelogram on its packaging with 25 (humorous) hunger symptoms. This is an example of high-level personalization that consumers could positively interact and identify with.

 

3. Put sustainability front and center

According to recent research by Futerra, nearly 90% of consumers would like brands to help them live more sustainably. This isn’t lost on packaging professionals—70% of whom feel environmental concerns for single-use plastic packaging are at an all-time high.

As strategy development occurs around the entire consumer-package interaction, brands have a social responsibility to hold discussions that not only consider sustainable packaging, but aim to deliver it. It is what consumers want and expect. And having packaging that puts sustainability front and center may win over a new customer.

 

4. Augment reality to show, not tell

Augmented reality (AR) trended hard and fast in 2016 with Pokémon Go. This mobile game generated more than $1 billion in revenue. It also offered up proof the public was AR-interested.

Truthfully, since 2016, AR’s impact on modern product packaging has been a bit muted. Early adopters, however, are using AR technology to make their product stand out on the shelf and take their message beyond the written word and into demonstration mode.

The key to making it work? Avoid using it as a gimmick. This technology is approachable and has endless possibilities. Leverage it to enhance product visualization, remove language barriers, and facilitate the purchase.

 

5. Drive the multi-sensory experience

Across a number of industries, we’re seeing soft-touch applications rise in popularity as brands swap out high-gloss finishes for a completely different aesthetic. As more consumers associate the touch and feel of a package with the quality of the product inside, soft-touch finishes initiate a multi-sensory experience that’s high-end, velvety, durable and resistant to fingerprints.

Remember, packaging is not meant to exist in 2D. When a consumer is drawn in by the visual elements of a package, a natural next step is to then pick it up off the shelf. This tactile interaction is where the love-at-first-sight—or even love-at-first-touch—experience gains steam.

 

6. Never lose sight of the where first interactions happen

Front door or in store, your customer’s first experience with a product and its packaging can vary greatly depending on the setting. Design accordingly.

For an ecommerce experience, the buying decision has already been made and the transaction is complete. In this case, brands should place additional emphasis around the opening experience. Consider saving the sensory experience for the inside of the box. Or enhance your credit on sustainability by shipping a product in its own container.

While security and protection for parcel transportation should always be top priority, packaging still provides brands with enough opportunities to produce an unexpected opening experience that deepens brand connection.

 

As brands think about what will make consumers fall in love with their products this year, they must first think about how to get a consumer to fall in love with their packaging. Appealing to consumer interests like sustainability are a great starting point, while integrating technology or new finishing techniques to create sensory experiences can make a match at the first moment of truth.

____________________________________________________________________________________________

Fist-bumpFind your success! Subscribe to free Packaging Digest enewsletters.

[post_excerpt] => “Love at first sight”—cliché for sure, but in a packaging sense, I would go so far as to call it the kind of first impression brands dream of.Making this a reality, however, requires a pivot in how brands conceptualize a package. From first sketch to f... [post_date_gmt] => 2020-02-13 20:00:11 [post_date] => 2020-02-13 20:00:11 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-02-13 20:00:11 [post_modified] => 2020-02-13 20:00:11 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => 29347 at https://www.packagingdigest.com [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Packaging Digest [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.packagingdigest.com [syndication_source_id] => http://www.packagingdigest.com/rss.xml [syndication_feed] => http://www.packagingdigest.com/rss.xml [syndication_feed_id] => 109 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.packagingdigest.com/packaging-design/create-packaging-that-inspires-love-at-first-sight-2020-02-13 [syndication_item_hash] => 7b2ec414146c0f58abbc6e3044a9578b ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 8266 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

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Image exists, checking for same file size

Replacing images : Fist-bump - Fist-bump ON

“Love at first sight”—cliché for sure, but in a packaging sense, I would go so far as to call it the kind of first impression brands dream of.

Making this a reality, however, requires a pivot in how brands conceptualize a package. From first sketch to first impression, it requires brands to think like a matchmaker. Because an optimal packaging strategy is really one that matches brand identity with the function of packaging.

Smartphone packaging is a perfect example of this—the packaging fits in the palm of your hand like the product inside. Crisp, perfect edges convey a look and feel that’s both high-end and familiar in the tech space. Smartphone packaging delivers a sensory experience that many consider second to none.

Love-at-first-sight packaging doesn’t have to be left to chance—or something only large smartphone manufacturers can achieve.

Remember, packaging is the only form of marketing that connects with every one of your consumers, regardless of the buying channel. To bring brand and function together effectively in a package’s design, I encourage you to play Cupid. Here are six ways to do just that:

 

1. Test smarter (and faster)

Smaller-run market tests provide companies an efficient, low-risk opportunity to test a variety of packaging combinations—structure, shape, graphics, material, messaging.

Through short runs, brands are able to create prototypes faster and, ultimately, observe how a package might look and perform in the marketplace. This also shortens the initial feedback loop and optimizes production costs by providing targeted clues that help redirect a package’s design for better results.

In the end, a brand is able to put a package on store shelves or door steps that will best appeal to its customers, drive sales, and deepen the brand connection.

 

2. Personalize the experience through variability

There’s no denying, one-to-one personalization can bring a brand closer to its customer. But personalization in a broader, more mass-produced sense may also strike a chord. Consider an approach that takes a few steps back and tailors a package for larger targets (instead of trying to tailor to each individual consumer).

For example, Snickers’ “You're Not You When You're Hungry" campaign replaced the iconic parallelogram on its packaging with 25 (humorous) hunger symptoms. This is an example of high-level personalization that consumers could positively interact and identify with.

 

3. Put sustainability front and center

According to recent research by Futerra, nearly 90% of consumers would like brands to help them live more sustainably. This isn’t lost on packaging professionals—70% of whom feel environmental concerns for single-use plastic packaging are at an all-time high.

As strategy development occurs around the entire consumer-package interaction, brands have a social responsibility to hold discussions that not only consider sustainable packaging, but aim to deliver it. It is what consumers want and expect. And having packaging that puts sustainability front and center may win over a new customer.

 

4. Augment reality to show, not tell

Augmented reality (AR) trended hard and fast in 2016 with Pokémon Go. This mobile game generated more than $1 billion in revenue. It also offered up proof the public was AR-interested.

Truthfully, since 2016, AR’s impact on modern product packaging has been a bit muted. Early adopters, however, are using AR technology to make their product stand out on the shelf and take their message beyond the written word and into demonstration mode.

The key to making it work? Avoid using it as a gimmick. This technology is approachable and has endless possibilities. Leverage it to enhance product visualization, remove language barriers, and facilitate the purchase.

 

5. Drive the multi-sensory experience

Across a number of industries, we’re seeing soft-touch applications rise in popularity as brands swap out high-gloss finishes for a completely different aesthetic. As more consumers associate the touch and feel of a package with the quality of the product inside, soft-touch finishes initiate a multi-sensory experience that’s high-end, velvety, durable and resistant to fingerprints.

Remember, packaging is not meant to exist in 2D. When a consumer is drawn in by the visual elements of a package, a natural next step is to then pick it up off the shelf. This tactile interaction is where the love-at-first-sight—or even love-at-first-touch—experience gains steam.

 

6. Never lose sight of the where first interactions happen

Front door or in store, your customer’s first experience with a product and its packaging can vary greatly depending on the setting. Design accordingly.

For an ecommerce experience, the buying decision has already been made and the transaction is complete. In this case, brands should place additional emphasis around the opening experience. Consider saving the sensory experience for the inside of the box. Or enhance your credit on sustainability by shipping a product in its own container.

While security and protection for parcel transportation should always be top priority, packaging still provides brands with enough opportunities to produce an unexpected opening experience that deepens brand connection.

 

As brands think about what will make consumers fall in love with their products this year, they must first think about how to get a consumer to fall in love with their packaging. Appealing to consumer interests like sustainability are a great starting point, while integrating technology or new finishing techniques to create sensory experiences can make a match at the first moment of truth.

____________________________________________________________________________________________

Fist-bumpFind your success! Subscribe to free Packaging Digest enewsletters.

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Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :Create packaging that inspires love at first sight

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“Love at first sight”—cliché for sure, but in a packaging sense, I would go so far as to call it the kind of first impression brands dream of.

Making this a reality, however, requires a pivot in how brands conceptualize a package. From first sketch to first impression, it requires brands to think like a matchmaker. Because an optimal packaging strategy is really one that matches brand identity with the function of packaging.

Smartphone packaging is a perfect example of this—the packaging fits in the palm of your hand like the product inside. Crisp, perfect edges convey a look and feel that’s both high-end and familiar in the tech space. Smartphone packaging delivers a sensory experience that many consider second to none.

Love-at-first-sight packaging doesn’t have to be left to chance—or something only large smartphone manufacturers can achieve.

Remember, packaging is the only form of marketing that connects with every one of your consumers, regardless of the buying channel. To bring brand and function together effectively in a package’s design, I encourage you to play Cupid. Here are six ways to do just that:

 

1. Test smarter (and faster)

Smaller-run market tests provide companies an efficient, low-risk opportunity to test a variety of packaging combinations—structure, shape, graphics, material, messaging.

Through short runs, brands are able to create prototypes faster and, ultimately, observe how a package might look and perform in the marketplace. This also shortens the initial feedback loop and optimizes production costs by providing targeted clues that help redirect a package’s design for better results.

In the end, a brand is able to put a package on store shelves or door steps that will best appeal to its customers, drive sales, and deepen the brand connection.

 

2. Personalize the experience through variability

There’s no denying, one-to-one personalization can bring a brand closer to its customer. But personalization in a broader, more mass-produced sense may also strike a chord. Consider an approach that takes a few steps back and tailors a package for larger targets (instead of trying to tailor to each individual consumer).

For example, Snickers’ “You're Not You When You're Hungry" campaign replaced the iconic parallelogram on its packaging with 25 (humorous) hunger symptoms. This is an example of high-level personalization that consumers could positively interact and identify with.

 

3. Put sustainability front and center

According to recent research by Futerra, nearly 90% of consumers would like brands to help them live more sustainably. This isn’t lost on packaging professionals—70% of whom feel environmental concerns for single-use plastic packaging are at an all-time high.

As strategy development occurs around the entire consumer-package interaction, brands have a social responsibility to hold discussions that not only consider sustainable packaging, but aim to deliver it. It is what consumers want and expect. And having packaging that puts sustainability front and center may win over a new customer.

 

4. Augment reality to show, not tell

Augmented reality (AR) trended hard and fast in 2016 with Pokémon Go. This mobile game generated more than $1 billion in revenue. It also offered up proof the public was AR-interested.

Truthfully, since 2016, AR’s impact on modern product packaging has been a bit muted. Early adopters, however, are using AR technology to make their product stand out on the shelf and take their message beyond the written word and into demonstration mode.

The key to making it work? Avoid using it as a gimmick. This technology is approachable and has endless possibilities. Leverage it to enhance product visualization, remove language barriers, and facilitate the purchase.

 

5. Drive the multi-sensory experience

Across a number of industries, we’re seeing soft-touch applications rise in popularity as brands swap out high-gloss finishes for a completely different aesthetic. As more consumers associate the touch and feel of a package with the quality of the product inside, soft-touch finishes initiate a multi-sensory experience that’s high-end, velvety, durable and resistant to fingerprints.

Remember, packaging is not meant to exist in 2D. When a consumer is drawn in by the visual elements of a package, a natural next step is to then pick it up off the shelf. This tactile interaction is where the love-at-first-sight—or even love-at-first-touch—experience gains steam.

 

6. Never lose sight of the where first interactions happen

Front door or in store, your customer’s first experience with a product and its packaging can vary greatly depending on the setting. Design accordingly.

For an ecommerce experience, the buying decision has already been made and the transaction is complete. In this case, brands should place additional emphasis around the opening experience. Consider saving the sensory experience for the inside of the box. Or enhance your credit on sustainability by shipping a product in its own container.

While security and protection for parcel transportation should always be top priority, packaging still provides brands with enough opportunities to produce an unexpected opening experience that deepens brand connection.

 

As brands think about what will make consumers fall in love with their products this year, they must first think about how to get a consumer to fall in love with their packaging. Appealing to consumer interests like sustainability are a great starting point, while integrating technology or new finishing techniques to create sensory experiences can make a match at the first moment of truth.

____________________________________________________________________________________________

Create packaging that inspires love at first sightFind your success! Subscribe to free Packaging Digest enewsletters.

[post_excerpt] => “Love at first sight”—cliché for sure, but in a packaging sense, I would go so far as to call it the kind of first impression brands dream of.Making this a reality, however, requires a pivot in how brands conceptualize a package. From first sketch to f... [post_date_gmt] => 2020-02-13 20:00:11 [post_date] => 2020-02-13 20:00:11 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-02-13 20:00:11 [post_modified] => 2020-02-13 20:00:11 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => 29347 at https://www.packagingdigest.com [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Packaging Digest [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.packagingdigest.com [syndication_source_id] => http://www.packagingdigest.com/rss.xml [syndication_feed] => http://www.packagingdigest.com/rss.xml [syndication_feed_id] => 109 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.packagingdigest.com/packaging-design/create-packaging-that-inspires-love-at-first-sight-2020-02-13 [syndication_item_hash] => 7b2ec414146c0f58abbc6e3044a9578b [faf_featured_image] => 0 [faf_process_image] => 0 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 8266 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

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How to select the right gripper for your packaging robot

Array ( [post_title] => How to select the right gripper for your packaging robot [post_content] =>

When moving products or packages in an industrial setting, properly matching a robot’s end-of-arm tooling to the materials being moved improves application effectiveness. That may seem like common sense, but hoisting or stacking different materials requires careful consideration of many essential variables to avoid accidents, injuries and downtime.

Primary considerations include:
• Size
• Weight
• Work piece shape
• Access
• Environment
• Work piece material/structure
• Motion
• Speed

One of the most common end-of-arm tooling options is the gripper. What is a gripper? Simply stated, a gripper is an interface between a robot or machine and the physical world. A gripper acts on the work piece (product or package), allowing the robot to hold and manipulate it as it performs a series of tasks.

It would require an in-house expert to review every option, setting and scenario of your operations, and how those elements can dictate your choice, but this baseline can give you the tools you need to begin evaluating your pick-and-place needs.

Now, let’s discuss whether mechanical grippers or vacuum grippers are best suited to solve your pick-and-place packaging challenges.

 

Mechanical grippers

Mechanical grippers use two or more “fingers,” also known as jaws, that close and grip the product or package. They are a cost-effective and reliable option for many standard pick-and-place packaging applications.

A mechanical gripper can maintain a firm hold on products or packages during high-speed movements and their powerful jaws can lift and hold heavy items, but are in danger of crushing delicate items without proper calibration. They can pick and place pieces with varying thickness without changing the gripper, but oddly shaped items may present a challenge to static jaw shapes and angles.

Mechanical grippers must operate in the same environment as the work piece, creating potential failure modes, and need enough room for the jaws to actuate. Additional space is necessary to allow it to grip a work piece from multiple sides.

____________________________________________________________________________________________

Fist-bumpFind your success! Subscribe to free Packaging Digest enewsletters.

____________________________________________________________________________________________

Mechanical grippers are driven by any of three power sources:

Pneumatic—Because most plants employ compressed air, pneumatic mechanical grippers are the most common and provide easy implementation, but do not always provide precise control.

Electric—Electrically driven mechanical grippers provide precise control, but are more expensive and must be contained within a larger package, resulting in challenges to the program or operation.

Hydraulic—Hydraulicgrippers provide high forces and are capable of lifting larger loads, but they are costly to purchase and maintain, and have the potential for fluid leaks.

Mechanical grippers are also available in four different styles:

1. Two-finger (jaw) angular—Easy to apply, capable of picking different sized parts with the same jaw, and moderately priced; require more space than vacuum grippers.

2. Two-finger (jaw) parallel—Versatile, able to pick the outside or inside of a part, suitable for smaller spaces and flexible enough to pick different sized parts with the same jaw; more expensive and may crush softer or more fragile products/packages.

3. Three finger (jaw) parallel—Helpful when proper positioning is required to move the item; requires the product/package to be properly oriented and positioned for secure grip, and can potentially crush delicate work pieces.

4. Two-finger (jaw) locking—Jaws lock when closed and hold parts firm even if power is lost; higher price point and requires more space than vacuum grippers.

 

Vacuum grippers

Unlike mechanical grippers, which use jaws to grasp and move items, vacuum grippers use soft foam rubber, plastic plenums or vacuum cups to pick up materials without damaging them. They are ideal for applications with extreme weights (very heavy or very light) or delicate work piece materials, where mechanical grip strength is too low to pick pieces or too high and causes damage.

Vacuum grippers are more versatile than their mechanical counterparts. They can adapt to smaller or larger items by adding additional cups or adjusting flow. Mechanical grippers can sometimes cause damage to the items they pick, but vacuum grippers can pick parts that are delicate or thin without causing damage. Vacuum grippers only need access to one side of a item, allowing them to pick products/packages more easily; on the downside, this sacrifices flexibility that could cause the item to drop. Additionally, small dense parts may not offer enough surface area for a vacuum gripper to pick the part.

Vacuum grippers can also be configured specifically for different environments. Vacuum cups are made from a variety of materials that can be compliant with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) or meet other regulatory requirements. The vacuum pump can be installed away from the pick point to protect it from environmental hazards.

Vacuum grippers rely on either electricity or compressed air for power. Electric vacuum grippers do not require cumbersome or awkward hoses to operate. The downside of this is low flow, which may make the gripper too weak to pick up some items.Compressed air vacuum grippers, on the other hand, can operate with high vacuum levels, enabling them to pick up heavy products/packages and provide greater flow for picking up parts that are porous.

Vacuum grippers have other variables that need to be considered when making a selection. Some grippers rely strictly on vacuum cups or foam pads to operate. Vacuum cups are easy to service and are highly precise in their operations, making it possible to choose ideal pick points on the work piece to prevent damage. They also come in a variety of shapes, sizes and materials that can be suited for most applications.

Vacuum grippers may also be found with foam pads. These can conform to the shape of the product/package and allow picking a variety of items with a single tool. However, they are not as capable of precise placement when compared to suction cups.

Other less common vacuum gripper options include:

Soft grippers, which use vacuum to actuate silicone fingers to conform to the product/package, making a gentle and flexible picking solution.

Magnetic grippers, which employ large magnets to pick up strong materials. An actuator pulls the magnet away from the work piece, thus releasing that part.

Bladder grippers, whichfeature a rubber bladder inflated inside a work piece to pick the part. Deflating the bladder releases the item.

 

It can be difficult to determine exactly what components are right for your packaging applications. But, using these guidelines, you should be on the right track to building your perfect pick-and-place device.

 

[post_excerpt] => When moving products or packages in an industrial setting, properly matching a robot’s end-of-arm tooling to the materials being moved improves application effectiveness. That may seem like common sense, but hoisting or stacking different materials req... [post_date_gmt] => 2020-02-13 19:26:18 [post_date] => 2020-02-13 19:26:18 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-02-13 19:26:18 [post_modified] => 2020-02-13 19:26:18 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => 29345 at https://www.packagingdigest.com [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Packaging Digest [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.packagingdigest.com [syndication_source_id] => http://www.packagingdigest.com/rss.xml [syndication_feed] => http://www.packagingdigest.com/rss.xml [syndication_feed_id] => 109 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.packagingdigest.com/robotics/how-to-select-the-right-gripper-for-your-packaging-robot-2020-02-13 [syndication_item_hash] => c15396afaa6ab8b73e68c1a50728f539 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 8266 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

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grab remote location : https://www.packagingdigest.com/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_750x422/public/Fist-bump-shutterstock_444269305-72dpi_0.jpg?itok=dZn854AL

Image exists, checking for same file size

Replacing images : Fist-bump - Fist-bump ON

When moving products or packages in an industrial setting, properly matching a robot’s end-of-arm tooling to the materials being moved improves application effectiveness. That may seem like common sense, but hoisting or stacking different materials requires careful consideration of many essential variables to avoid accidents, injuries and downtime.

Primary considerations include:
• Size
• Weight
• Work piece shape
• Access
• Environment
• Work piece material/structure
• Motion
• Speed

One of the most common end-of-arm tooling options is the gripper. What is a gripper? Simply stated, a gripper is an interface between a robot or machine and the physical world. A gripper acts on the work piece (product or package), allowing the robot to hold and manipulate it as it performs a series of tasks.

It would require an in-house expert to review every option, setting and scenario of your operations, and how those elements can dictate your choice, but this baseline can give you the tools you need to begin evaluating your pick-and-place needs.

Now, let’s discuss whether mechanical grippers or vacuum grippers are best suited to solve your pick-and-place packaging challenges.

 

Mechanical grippers

Mechanical grippers use two or more “fingers,” also known as jaws, that close and grip the product or package. They are a cost-effective and reliable option for many standard pick-and-place packaging applications.

A mechanical gripper can maintain a firm hold on products or packages during high-speed movements and their powerful jaws can lift and hold heavy items, but are in danger of crushing delicate items without proper calibration. They can pick and place pieces with varying thickness without changing the gripper, but oddly shaped items may present a challenge to static jaw shapes and angles.

Mechanical grippers must operate in the same environment as the work piece, creating potential failure modes, and need enough room for the jaws to actuate. Additional space is necessary to allow it to grip a work piece from multiple sides.

____________________________________________________________________________________________

Fist-bumpFind your success! Subscribe to free Packaging Digest enewsletters.

____________________________________________________________________________________________

Mechanical grippers are driven by any of three power sources:

Pneumatic—Because most plants employ compressed air, pneumatic mechanical grippers are the most common and provide easy implementation, but do not always provide precise control.

Electric—Electrically driven mechanical grippers provide precise control, but are more expensive and must be contained within a larger package, resulting in challenges to the program or operation.

Hydraulic—Hydraulicgrippers provide high forces and are capable of lifting larger loads, but they are costly to purchase and maintain, and have the potential for fluid leaks.

Mechanical grippers are also available in four different styles:

1. Two-finger (jaw) angular—Easy to apply, capable of picking different sized parts with the same jaw, and moderately priced; require more space than vacuum grippers.

2. Two-finger (jaw) parallel—Versatile, able to pick the outside or inside of a part, suitable for smaller spaces and flexible enough to pick different sized parts with the same jaw; more expensive and may crush softer or more fragile products/packages.

3. Three finger (jaw) parallel—Helpful when proper positioning is required to move the item; requires the product/package to be properly oriented and positioned for secure grip, and can potentially crush delicate work pieces.

4. Two-finger (jaw) locking—Jaws lock when closed and hold parts firm even if power is lost; higher price point and requires more space than vacuum grippers.

 

Vacuum grippers

Unlike mechanical grippers, which use jaws to grasp and move items, vacuum grippers use soft foam rubber, plastic plenums or vacuum cups to pick up materials without damaging them. They are ideal for applications with extreme weights (very heavy or very light) or delicate work piece materials, where mechanical grip strength is too low to pick pieces or too high and causes damage.

Vacuum grippers are more versatile than their mechanical counterparts. They can adapt to smaller or larger items by adding additional cups or adjusting flow. Mechanical grippers can sometimes cause damage to the items they pick, but vacuum grippers can pick parts that are delicate or thin without causing damage. Vacuum grippers only need access to one side of a item, allowing them to pick products/packages more easily; on the downside, this sacrifices flexibility that could cause the item to drop. Additionally, small dense parts may not offer enough surface area for a vacuum gripper to pick the part.

Vacuum grippers can also be configured specifically for different environments. Vacuum cups are made from a variety of materials that can be compliant with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) or meet other regulatory requirements. The vacuum pump can be installed away from the pick point to protect it from environmental hazards.

Vacuum grippers rely on either electricity or compressed air for power. Electric vacuum grippers do not require cumbersome or awkward hoses to operate. The downside of this is low flow, which may make the gripper too weak to pick up some items.Compressed air vacuum grippers, on the other hand, can operate with high vacuum levels, enabling them to pick up heavy products/packages and provide greater flow for picking up parts that are porous.

Vacuum grippers have other variables that need to be considered when making a selection. Some grippers rely strictly on vacuum cups or foam pads to operate. Vacuum cups are easy to service and are highly precise in their operations, making it possible to choose ideal pick points on the work piece to prevent damage. They also come in a variety of shapes, sizes and materials that can be suited for most applications.

Vacuum grippers may also be found with foam pads. These can conform to the shape of the product/package and allow picking a variety of items with a single tool. However, they are not as capable of precise placement when compared to suction cups.

Other less common vacuum gripper options include:

Soft grippers, which use vacuum to actuate silicone fingers to conform to the product/package, making a gentle and flexible picking solution.

Magnetic grippers, which employ large magnets to pick up strong materials. An actuator pulls the magnet away from the work piece, thus releasing that part.

Bladder grippers, whichfeature a rubber bladder inflated inside a work piece to pick the part. Deflating the bladder releases the item.

 

It can be difficult to determine exactly what components are right for your packaging applications. But, using these guidelines, you should be on the right track to building your perfect pick-and-place device.

 

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Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :How to select the right gripper for your packaging robot

Array ( [post_title] => How to select the right gripper for your packaging robot [post_content] =>

When moving products or packages in an industrial setting, properly matching a robot’s end-of-arm tooling to the materials being moved improves application effectiveness. That may seem like common sense, but hoisting or stacking different materials requires careful consideration of many essential variables to avoid accidents, injuries and downtime.

Primary considerations include:
• Size
• Weight
• Work piece shape
• Access
• Environment
• Work piece material/structure
• Motion
• Speed

One of the most common end-of-arm tooling options is the gripper. What is a gripper? Simply stated, a gripper is an interface between a robot or machine and the physical world. A gripper acts on the work piece (product or package), allowing the robot to hold and manipulate it as it performs a series of tasks.

It would require an in-house expert to review every option, setting and scenario of your operations, and how those elements can dictate your choice, but this baseline can give you the tools you need to begin evaluating your pick-and-place needs.

Now, let’s discuss whether mechanical grippers or vacuum grippers are best suited to solve your pick-and-place packaging challenges.

 

Mechanical grippers

Mechanical grippers use two or more “fingers,” also known as jaws, that close and grip the product or package. They are a cost-effective and reliable option for many standard pick-and-place packaging applications.

A mechanical gripper can maintain a firm hold on products or packages during high-speed movements and their powerful jaws can lift and hold heavy items, but are in danger of crushing delicate items without proper calibration. They can pick and place pieces with varying thickness without changing the gripper, but oddly shaped items may present a challenge to static jaw shapes and angles.

Mechanical grippers must operate in the same environment as the work piece, creating potential failure modes, and need enough room for the jaws to actuate. Additional space is necessary to allow it to grip a work piece from multiple sides.

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Mechanical grippers are driven by any of three power sources:

Pneumatic—Because most plants employ compressed air, pneumatic mechanical grippers are the most common and provide easy implementation, but do not always provide precise control.

Electric—Electrically driven mechanical grippers provide precise control, but are more expensive and must be contained within a larger package, resulting in challenges to the program or operation.

Hydraulic—Hydraulicgrippers provide high forces and are capable of lifting larger loads, but they are costly to purchase and maintain, and have the potential for fluid leaks.

Mechanical grippers are also available in four different styles:

1. Two-finger (jaw) angular—Easy to apply, capable of picking different sized parts with the same jaw, and moderately priced; require more space than vacuum grippers.

2. Two-finger (jaw) parallel—Versatile, able to pick the outside or inside of a part, suitable for smaller spaces and flexible enough to pick different sized parts with the same jaw; more expensive and may crush softer or more fragile products/packages.

3. Three finger (jaw) parallel—Helpful when proper positioning is required to move the item; requires the product/package to be properly oriented and positioned for secure grip, and can potentially crush delicate work pieces.

4. Two-finger (jaw) locking—Jaws lock when closed and hold parts firm even if power is lost; higher price point and requires more space than vacuum grippers.

 

Vacuum grippers

Unlike mechanical grippers, which use jaws to grasp and move items, vacuum grippers use soft foam rubber, plastic plenums or vacuum cups to pick up materials without damaging them. They are ideal for applications with extreme weights (very heavy or very light) or delicate work piece materials, where mechanical grip strength is too low to pick pieces or too high and causes damage.

Vacuum grippers are more versatile than their mechanical counterparts. They can adapt to smaller or larger items by adding additional cups or adjusting flow. Mechanical grippers can sometimes cause damage to the items they pick, but vacuum grippers can pick parts that are delicate or thin without causing damage. Vacuum grippers only need access to one side of a item, allowing them to pick products/packages more easily; on the downside, this sacrifices flexibility that could cause the item to drop. Additionally, small dense parts may not offer enough surface area for a vacuum gripper to pick the part.

Vacuum grippers can also be configured specifically for different environments. Vacuum cups are made from a variety of materials that can be compliant with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) or meet other regulatory requirements. The vacuum pump can be installed away from the pick point to protect it from environmental hazards.

Vacuum grippers rely on either electricity or compressed air for power. Electric vacuum grippers do not require cumbersome or awkward hoses to operate. The downside of this is low flow, which may make the gripper too weak to pick up some items.Compressed air vacuum grippers, on the other hand, can operate with high vacuum levels, enabling them to pick up heavy products/packages and provide greater flow for picking up parts that are porous.

Vacuum grippers have other variables that need to be considered when making a selection. Some grippers rely strictly on vacuum cups or foam pads to operate. Vacuum cups are easy to service and are highly precise in their operations, making it possible to choose ideal pick points on the work piece to prevent damage. They also come in a variety of shapes, sizes and materials that can be suited for most applications.

Vacuum grippers may also be found with foam pads. These can conform to the shape of the product/package and allow picking a variety of items with a single tool. However, they are not as capable of precise placement when compared to suction cups.

Other less common vacuum gripper options include:

Soft grippers, which use vacuum to actuate silicone fingers to conform to the product/package, making a gentle and flexible picking solution.

Magnetic grippers, which employ large magnets to pick up strong materials. An actuator pulls the magnet away from the work piece, thus releasing that part.

Bladder grippers, whichfeature a rubber bladder inflated inside a work piece to pick the part. Deflating the bladder releases the item.

 

It can be difficult to determine exactly what components are right for your packaging applications. But, using these guidelines, you should be on the right track to building your perfect pick-and-place device.

 

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FAF deciding on filters on post to be syndicated:

First reusable egg cartons appear at retail

Array ( [post_title] => First reusable egg cartons appear at retail [post_content] =>

With industry-first reusable egg cartons, Pete and Gerry's Organic Eggs proves that small companies can develop breakthrough sustainable packaging.

 

Packaging professionals don’t really need to know whether the chicken or the egg came first, but they should know that the industry’s first reusable egg carton is here and came from Pete and Gerry's Organic Eggs of Monroe, NH.

In joining major brands like Procter & Gamble, PepsiCo, Nestlé and Unilever that have developed reusable packaging, Pete and Gerry’s proves that you don’t have to be big to implement big ideas.

Made of recycled, durable, BPA-free plastic which can be washed at home and reused repeatedly, the new plastic egg cartons are currently in pilot at Hanover Co-op Food Stores in New Hampshire and Vermont.

It’s a notable accomplishment considering the frequency of use: the average person in the U.S. eats approximately 279 eggs per year or about 23 cartons worth that, projected over a lifetime, would save more than 1,800 cartons per person, according to Pete and Gerry’s.

"While we are confident in the sustainability of our current carton, which is made from 100% recycled plastic and has less environmental impact than the [expanded polystyrene] or molded pulp cartons used by conventional egg brands, we continue to challenge ourselves to find even better ways to improve our environmental stewardship," says Jesse Laflamme, Pete and Gerry's Organic Eggs CEO.  "Reusable cartons are a logical next step in our ongoing commitment to sustainability, moving consumer behavior from recycling to reuse.”

Laflamme informs Packaging Digest that the pilot began in December 2019 and since then the brand has received “really positive feedback from retailers and consumers. We plan to expand this program in 2020 to reach even more consumers and amplify the program's impact nationally with major retailers clamoring for this type of sustainable innovation."

Laflamme discloses that the reusable plastic carton is made from durable, recycled BPA-free polypropylene. The rest of the interview follows.

What prompted this “outside the egg carton” idea?

Laflamme: As a Certified B Corporation, we take great care in how our business practices impact the environment, our workers, the wider community and are always working to improve on the current practices in place. While we are confident in the sustainability of our current carton, we wanted to challenge ourselves to find an even better way to improve our environmental stewardship—and ultimately, we recognized that reuse is even better than recycling.

With reusable shopping bags now the norm, we thought, why not do the same for our egg cartons? That’s how the idea for the project came about that’s currently in pilot. 

 

How is this different from the brand’s standard, single-use plastic carton?

Laflamme: The key component is that the new reusable egg carton has been designed with durability in mind and can be washed at home and reused repeatedly.  While the current rPET carton is great because it’s made of 100% recycled plastic and is one of the most widely recyclable materials, this new carton moves up the Reduce-Reuse-Recycle hierarchy. 

 

Any special challenges or considerations?

Laflamme: An initial concern of ours was transporting, protecting and presenting the loose eggs.  Additionally, convincing retailers to supply the space for the educational display that houses the reusable cartons was a hurdle.  However, this was perceived as very exciting innovation in a category that has traditionally been starved for innovation. 

 

What input did Co-Op Food Stores have in the packaging and project?

Laflamme: Mainly, we worked with the Co-Op Food Stores to ensure that it would work from a store operations standpoint. 

 

Please comment on the new in-store bulk container (shown below) from which consumers select eggs to place in the new carton.

Laflamme: This item was custom designed to fit on an egg shelf. It has a tearaway front that enables consumers to easily access the bulk eggs. We designed it so that it fits in the facing of a traditional egg carton.  This item is made of recycled cardboard corrugate which is recycled by the stores after use.  Eventually, we would like to make all aspects of this program reusable including the egg shipper. 

 

What are the benefits of the program for stakeholders?

Laflamme: Like many other major consumer packaged goods companies, we recognize that reuse is even better than recycling, and we’re proud to be at the forefront of this growing movement to help reduce the impact of packaging on the planet. Additionally, from a cost perspective, we sell the loose eggs at a discounted rate, allowing the reusable carton to pay for itself over time, further incentivizing shoppers to participate.

 

About how many roundtrips for consumer payback?

Laflamme: The refill eggs are priced so that the savings pays for the one-time carton purchase over six trips. 

 

Who's the target consumer for this?

Laflamme: Everyone! Eggs are one of the most widely consumed, affordable and nutrient-dense foods on the market. The more people we can convert to choosing reusable cartons to lessen our environmental impact, the better. Until then, we encourage consumers to recycle their cartons or participate in our carton Take Back Program.

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Replacing images : - ON

With industry-first reusable egg cartons, Pete and Gerry's Organic Eggs proves that small companies can develop breakthrough sustainable packaging.

 

Packaging professionals don’t really need to know whether the chicken or the egg came first, but they should know that the industry’s first reusable egg carton is here and came from Pete and Gerry's Organic Eggs of Monroe, NH.

In joining major brands like Procter & Gamble, PepsiCo, Nestlé and Unilever that have developed reusable packaging, Pete and Gerry’s proves that you don’t have to be big to implement big ideas.

Made of recycled, durable, BPA-free plastic which can be washed at home and reused repeatedly, the new plastic egg cartons are currently in pilot at Hanover Co-op Food Stores in New Hampshire and Vermont.

It’s a notable accomplishment considering the frequency of use: the average person in the U.S. eats approximately 279 eggs per year or about 23 cartons worth that, projected over a lifetime, would save more than 1,800 cartons per person, according to Pete and Gerry’s.

"While we are confident in the sustainability of our current carton, which is made from 100% recycled plastic and has less environmental impact than the [expanded polystyrene] or molded pulp cartons used by conventional egg brands, we continue to challenge ourselves to find even better ways to improve our environmental stewardship," says Jesse Laflamme, Pete and Gerry's Organic Eggs CEO.  "Reusable cartons are a logical next step in our ongoing commitment to sustainability, moving consumer behavior from recycling to reuse.”

Laflamme informs Packaging Digest that the pilot began in December 2019 and since then the brand has received “really positive feedback from retailers and consumers. We plan to expand this program in 2020 to reach even more consumers and amplify the program's impact nationally with major retailers clamoring for this type of sustainable innovation."

Laflamme discloses that the reusable plastic carton is made from durable, recycled BPA-free polypropylene. The rest of the interview follows.

What prompted this “outside the egg carton” idea?

Laflamme: As a Certified B Corporation, we take great care in how our business practices impact the environment, our workers, the wider community and are always working to improve on the current practices in place. While we are confident in the sustainability of our current carton, we wanted to challenge ourselves to find an even better way to improve our environmental stewardship—and ultimately, we recognized that reuse is even better than recycling.

With reusable shopping bags now the norm, we thought, why not do the same for our egg cartons? That’s how the idea for the project came about that’s currently in pilot. 

 

How is this different from the brand’s standard, single-use plastic carton?

Laflamme: The key component is that the new reusable egg carton has been designed with durability in mind and can be washed at home and reused repeatedly.  While the current rPET carton is great because it’s made of 100% recycled plastic and is one of the most widely recyclable materials, this new carton moves up the Reduce-Reuse-Recycle hierarchy. 

 

Any special challenges or considerations?

Laflamme: An initial concern of ours was transporting, protecting and presenting the loose eggs.  Additionally, convincing retailers to supply the space for the educational display that houses the reusable cartons was a hurdle.  However, this was perceived as very exciting innovation in a category that has traditionally been starved for innovation. 

 

What input did Co-Op Food Stores have in the packaging and project?

Laflamme: Mainly, we worked with the Co-Op Food Stores to ensure that it would work from a store operations standpoint. 

 

Please comment on the new in-store bulk container (shown below) from which consumers select eggs to place in the new carton.

Laflamme: This item was custom designed to fit on an egg shelf. It has a tearaway front that enables consumers to easily access the bulk eggs. We designed it so that it fits in the facing of a traditional egg carton.  This item is made of recycled cardboard corrugate which is recycled by the stores after use.  Eventually, we would like to make all aspects of this program reusable including the egg shipper. 

 

What are the benefits of the program for stakeholders?

Laflamme: Like many other major consumer packaged goods companies, we recognize that reuse is even better than recycling, and we’re proud to be at the forefront of this growing movement to help reduce the impact of packaging on the planet. Additionally, from a cost perspective, we sell the loose eggs at a discounted rate, allowing the reusable carton to pay for itself over time, further incentivizing shoppers to participate.

 

About how many roundtrips for consumer payback?

Laflamme: The refill eggs are priced so that the savings pays for the one-time carton purchase over six trips. 

 

Who's the target consumer for this?

Laflamme: Everyone! Eggs are one of the most widely consumed, affordable and nutrient-dense foods on the market. The more people we can convert to choosing reusable cartons to lessen our environmental impact, the better. Until then, we encourage consumers to recycle their cartons or participate in our carton Take Back Program.

Local save:https://www.packagingdigest.com/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_750x422/public/Pete-Gerry%27s-Eggs-Instore-Shipper-Display-PD.jpg?itok=b9ikL7d4

Image process :: Saving local image

grab remote location : https://www.packagingdigest.com/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_750x422/public/Pete-Gerry%27s-Eggs-Instore-Shipper-Display-PD.jpg?itok=b9ikL7d4

Image exists, checking for same file size

Replacing images : - ON

With industry-first reusable egg cartons, Pete and Gerry's Organic Eggs proves that small companies can develop breakthrough sustainable packaging.

 

Packaging professionals don’t really need to know whether the chicken or the egg came first, but they should know that the industry’s first reusable egg carton is here and came from Pete and Gerry's Organic Eggs of Monroe, NH.

In joining major brands like Procter & Gamble, PepsiCo, Nestlé and Unilever that have developed reusable packaging, Pete and Gerry’s proves that you don’t have to be big to implement big ideas.

Made of recycled, durable, BPA-free plastic which can be washed at home and reused repeatedly, the new plastic egg cartons are currently in pilot at Hanover Co-op Food Stores in New Hampshire and Vermont.

It’s a notable accomplishment considering the frequency of use: the average person in the U.S. eats approximately 279 eggs per year or about 23 cartons worth that, projected over a lifetime, would save more than 1,800 cartons per person, according to Pete and Gerry’s.

"While we are confident in the sustainability of our current carton, which is made from 100% recycled plastic and has less environmental impact than the [expanded polystyrene] or molded pulp cartons used by conventional egg brands, we continue to challenge ourselves to find even better ways to improve our environmental stewardship," says Jesse Laflamme, Pete and Gerry's Organic Eggs CEO.  "Reusable cartons are a logical next step in our ongoing commitment to sustainability, moving consumer behavior from recycling to reuse.”

Laflamme informs Packaging Digest that the pilot began in December 2019 and since then the brand has received “really positive feedback from retailers and consumers. We plan to expand this program in 2020 to reach even more consumers and amplify the program's impact nationally with major retailers clamoring for this type of sustainable innovation."

Laflamme discloses that the reusable plastic carton is made from durable, recycled BPA-free polypropylene. The rest of the interview follows.

First reusable egg cartons appear at retail

What prompted this “outside the egg carton” idea?

Laflamme: As a Certified B Corporation, we take great care in how our business practices impact the environment, our workers, the wider community and are always working to improve on the current practices in place. While we are confident in the sustainability of our current carton, we wanted to challenge ourselves to find an even better way to improve our environmental stewardship—and ultimately, we recognized that reuse is even better than recycling.

With reusable shopping bags now the norm, we thought, why not do the same for our egg cartons? That’s how the idea for the project came about that’s currently in pilot. 

 

How is this different from the brand’s standard, single-use plastic carton?

Laflamme: The key component is that the new reusable egg carton has been designed with durability in mind and can be washed at home and reused repeatedly.  While the current rPET carton is great because it’s made of 100% recycled plastic and is one of the most widely recyclable materials, this new carton moves up the Reduce-Reuse-Recycle hierarchy. 

 

Any special challenges or considerations?

Laflamme: An initial concern of ours was transporting, protecting and presenting the loose eggs.  Additionally, convincing retailers to supply the space for the educational display that houses the reusable cartons was a hurdle.  However, this was perceived as very exciting innovation in a category that has traditionally been starved for innovation. 

 

What input did Co-Op Food Stores have in the packaging and project?

Laflamme: Mainly, we worked with the Co-Op Food Stores to ensure that it would work from a store operations standpoint. 

 

Please comment on the new in-store bulk container (shown below) from which consumers select eggs to place in the new carton.

Laflamme: This item was custom designed to fit on an egg shelf. It has a tearaway front that enables consumers to easily access the bulk eggs. We designed it so that it fits in the facing of a traditional egg carton.  This item is made of recycled cardboard corrugate which is recycled by the stores after use.  Eventually, we would like to make all aspects of this program reusable including the egg shipper. 

 

What are the benefits of the program for stakeholders?

Laflamme: Like many other major consumer packaged goods companies, we recognize that reuse is even better than recycling, and we’re proud to be at the forefront of this growing movement to help reduce the impact of packaging on the planet. Additionally, from a cost perspective, we sell the loose eggs at a discounted rate, allowing the reusable carton to pay for itself over time, further incentivizing shoppers to participate.

 

About how many roundtrips for consumer payback?

Laflamme: The refill eggs are priced so that the savings pays for the one-time carton purchase over six trips. 

 

Who's the target consumer for this?

Laflamme: Everyone! Eggs are one of the most widely consumed, affordable and nutrient-dense foods on the market. The more people we can convert to choosing reusable cartons to lessen our environmental impact, the better. Until then, we encourage consumers to recycle their cartons or participate in our carton Take Back Program.

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Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :First reusable egg cartons appear at retail

Array ( [post_title] => First reusable egg cartons appear at retail [post_content] =>

With industry-first reusable egg cartons, Pete and Gerry's Organic Eggs proves that small companies can develop breakthrough sustainable packaging.

 

Packaging professionals don’t really need to know whether the chicken or the egg came first, but they should know that the industry’s first reusable egg carton is here and came from Pete and Gerry's Organic Eggs of Monroe, NH.

In joining major brands like Procter & Gamble, PepsiCo, Nestlé and Unilever that have developed reusable packaging, Pete and Gerry’s proves that you don’t have to be big to implement big ideas.

Made of recycled, durable, BPA-free plastic which can be washed at home and reused repeatedly, the new plastic egg cartons are currently in pilot at Hanover Co-op Food Stores in New Hampshire and Vermont.

It’s a notable accomplishment considering the frequency of use: the average person in the U.S. eats approximately 279 eggs per year or about 23 cartons worth that, projected over a lifetime, would save more than 1,800 cartons per person, according to Pete and Gerry’s.

"While we are confident in the sustainability of our current carton, which is made from 100% recycled plastic and has less environmental impact than the [expanded polystyrene] or molded pulp cartons used by conventional egg brands, we continue to challenge ourselves to find even better ways to improve our environmental stewardship," says Jesse Laflamme, Pete and Gerry's Organic Eggs CEO.  "Reusable cartons are a logical next step in our ongoing commitment to sustainability, moving consumer behavior from recycling to reuse.”

Laflamme informs Packaging Digest that the pilot began in December 2019 and since then the brand has received “really positive feedback from retailers and consumers. We plan to expand this program in 2020 to reach even more consumers and amplify the program's impact nationally with major retailers clamoring for this type of sustainable innovation."

Laflamme discloses that the reusable plastic carton is made from durable, recycled BPA-free polypropylene. The rest of the interview follows.

First reusable egg cartons appear at retail

What prompted this “outside the egg carton” idea?

Laflamme: As a Certified B Corporation, we take great care in how our business practices impact the environment, our workers, the wider community and are always working to improve on the current practices in place. While we are confident in the sustainability of our current carton, we wanted to challenge ourselves to find an even better way to improve our environmental stewardship—and ultimately, we recognized that reuse is even better than recycling.

With reusable shopping bags now the norm, we thought, why not do the same for our egg cartons? That’s how the idea for the project came about that’s currently in pilot. 

 

How is this different from the brand’s standard, single-use plastic carton?

Laflamme: The key component is that the new reusable egg carton has been designed with durability in mind and can be washed at home and reused repeatedly.  While the current rPET carton is great because it’s made of 100% recycled plastic and is one of the most widely recyclable materials, this new carton moves up the Reduce-Reuse-Recycle hierarchy. 

 

Any special challenges or considerations?

Laflamme: An initial concern of ours was transporting, protecting and presenting the loose eggs.  Additionally, convincing retailers to supply the space for the educational display that houses the reusable cartons was a hurdle.  However, this was perceived as very exciting innovation in a category that has traditionally been starved for innovation. 

 

What input did Co-Op Food Stores have in the packaging and project?

Laflamme: Mainly, we worked with the Co-Op Food Stores to ensure that it would work from a store operations standpoint. 

 

Please comment on the new in-store bulk container (shown below) from which consumers select eggs to place in the new carton.

Laflamme: This item was custom designed to fit on an egg shelf. It has a tearaway front that enables consumers to easily access the bulk eggs. We designed it so that it fits in the facing of a traditional egg carton.  This item is made of recycled cardboard corrugate which is recycled by the stores after use.  Eventually, we would like to make all aspects of this program reusable including the egg shipper. 

First reusable egg cartons appear at retail

 

What are the benefits of the program for stakeholders?

Laflamme: Like many other major consumer packaged goods companies, we recognize that reuse is even better than recycling, and we’re proud to be at the forefront of this growing movement to help reduce the impact of packaging on the planet. Additionally, from a cost perspective, we sell the loose eggs at a discounted rate, allowing the reusable carton to pay for itself over time, further incentivizing shoppers to participate.

 

About how many roundtrips for consumer payback?

Laflamme: The refill eggs are priced so that the savings pays for the one-time carton purchase over six trips. 

 

Who's the target consumer for this?

Laflamme: Everyone! Eggs are one of the most widely consumed, affordable and nutrient-dense foods on the market. The more people we can convert to choosing reusable cartons to lessen our environmental impact, the better. Until then, we encourage consumers to recycle their cartons or participate in our carton Take Back Program.

[post_excerpt] => With industry-first reusable egg cartons, Pete and Gerry's Organic Eggs proves that small companies can develop breakthrough sustainable packaging. Packaging professionals don’t really need to know whether the chicken or the egg came first, but they sh... [post_date_gmt] => 2020-02-11 19:07:40 [post_date] => 2020-02-11 19:07:40 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-02-11 19:07:40 [post_modified] => 2020-02-11 19:07:40 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => 29343 at https://www.packagingdigest.com [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => image/jpeg ) [syndication_source] => Packaging Digest [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.packagingdigest.com [syndication_source_id] => http://www.packagingdigest.com/rss.xml [syndication_feed] => http://www.packagingdigest.com/rss.xml [syndication_feed_id] => 109 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.packagingdigest.com/cartons/first-reusable-egg-cartons-at-retail-2020-02-11 [syndication_item_hash] => 75821f118b9a3ad3d94911caf0e9ad68 [faf_featured_image] => 0 [faf_process_image] => 0,0,0 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 8266 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

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Innovation adds resealability to food and beverage cans

Array ( [post_title] => Innovation adds resealability to food and beverage cans [post_content] =>

Canovation’s patented end design can turn any metal food or beverage can into a resealable one, from carbonated beverages to wet foods to cannabis.
 

The cliché for inventive minds is to create a better mousetrap. If applied to packaging, the most obvious “mousetrap” that could benefit from inventive improvement may be the food or beverage can, made of tin-plated steel or aluminum, respectively.

Both are available universally for good reason: they remain go-to containers for food and beverages because they do the job—preserve the contents and do it reliably—and they are cheap.

In short, they are utilitarian as in being functionally ideal containers that—let’s face it—can be viewed as plain-old boring.

Plus there’s one thing metal cans can’t do, and that’s reseal. Once you open a food can you’ve got to store it in another container if you don’t finish it all, which is a universally accepted routine.

Perhaps no longer, which is part of the reason Canovation LLC believes it has a winner with CanReseal, a proprietary, internally-threaded end design that allows an end made of metal or plastic to be screwed into the top of the can and above the standard metal end, transforming the can into a resealable container after opening. All consumers do is remove the CanReseal end and, after opening the can as they usually do, then reapply the CanReseal cap to preserve the remaining contents.

Virtually any metal can of any size of can be adapted to the CanReseal design, according to the inventor, Daniel Zabaleta of Canovation. “CanReseal is adaptable to most any metal package type and application.”

The list of applicable products is expansive, from carbonated to still beverages, dry to wet foods, consumer goods and pharmaceuticals and to paint and other chemicals.

Cans using the CanReseal ends process, perform, ship and store like regular cans.

Whether made of metal or plastic, the CanReseal cap is designed specifically to meet the brand’s product requirements.

 

Readily adaptable and gaining traction

It is also easily integrated and manufacturable, highly marketable and differentiating and is economical.

What’s required for canmakers to do to manufacture CanReseal cans is to thread the interior of the can end near the top of the can to allow the reseal cap to be screwed down to create an air-tight seal. That positive seal is something overcaps can’t do, Zabaleta points out.

Canmakers would need a set of specialty changeparts for their existing machinery in order to do the threading, which is what Stolle is developing.

And in this eco-driven era, Canovation’s CanReseal is environmentally sustainable and easily recyclable as any standard can when a metal cap is used.

In development over the past months, the technology is poised to advance. “We are currently building up to enter our commercialization stage,” says Zabaleta.  “Stolle Machinery is leading the effort to finalize the development for the commercial version for the CanReseal all-metal, resealable beverage can for still (noncarbonated) applications. We anticipate this will be completed by this summer. We are also working with potential manufacturing and commercialization partners to manufacture the aforementioned beverage solution, hopefully by the end of 2020.”

What about brand interest?

“There are several major beverage and food brands that have expressed interest in the CanReseal container,” Zabaleta discloses. “A couple major beverage brands are in the process of testing the technology for commercial consideration.”

Concurrently, the company is beginning to work with Stolle to develop a resealable container for the rapidly-growing cannabis products market.

“Child Resistance and Dosing functionality can easily be designed into the CanReseal's cap, allowing our resealable cans to comply with current cannabis packaging regulations,” says Zabaleta. 

See the new CanReseal in person during WestPack 2020 (Feb. 11-13; Anaheim, CA) at the Cannabis Packaging Summit in Booth Level 3 Ballroom, as well during MetPack 2020 (May 5-9; Essen, Germany) in Hall 2, Stand 2A18.

____________________________________________________________________________________________

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[post_excerpt] => Canovation’s patented end design can turn any metal food or beverage can into a resealable one, from carbonated beverages to wet foods to cannabis. The cliché for inventive minds is to create a better mousetrap. If applied to packaging, the most obviou... [post_date_gmt] => 2020-02-06 21:09:20 [post_date] => 2020-02-06 21:09:20 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-02-06 21:09:20 [post_modified] => 2020-02-06 21:09:20 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => 29342 at https://www.packagingdigest.com [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => https://www.packagingdigest.com/sites/default/files/Westpack 2020 Cannabis Canovation Wide Card PD.jpg image/jpeg ) [syndication_source] => Packaging Digest [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.packagingdigest.com [syndication_source_id] => http://www.packagingdigest.com/rss.xml [syndication_feed] => http://www.packagingdigest.com/rss.xml [syndication_feed_id] => 109 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.packagingdigest.com/cans/innovation-adds-reseal-to-food-beverage-cans-2020-02-06 [syndication_item_hash] => ac02b6aefee0ff7e6c3230306c0ebfa9 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 8266 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

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Canovation’s patented end design can turn any metal food or beverage can into a resealable one, from carbonated beverages to wet foods to cannabis.
 

The cliché for inventive minds is to create a better mousetrap. If applied to packaging, the most obvious “mousetrap” that could benefit from inventive improvement may be the food or beverage can, made of tin-plated steel or aluminum, respectively.

Both are available universally for good reason: they remain go-to containers for food and beverages because they do the job—preserve the contents and do it reliably—and they are cheap.

In short, they are utilitarian as in being functionally ideal containers that—let’s face it—can be viewed as plain-old boring.

Plus there’s one thing metal cans can’t do, and that’s reseal. Once you open a food can you’ve got to store it in another container if you don’t finish it all, which is a universally accepted routine.

Perhaps no longer, which is part of the reason Canovation LLC believes it has a winner with CanReseal, a proprietary, internally-threaded end design that allows an end made of metal or plastic to be screwed into the top of the can and above the standard metal end, transforming the can into a resealable container after opening. All consumers do is remove the CanReseal end and, after opening the can as they usually do, then reapply the CanReseal cap to preserve the remaining contents.

Virtually any metal can of any size of can be adapted to the CanReseal design, according to the inventor, Daniel Zabaleta of Canovation. “CanReseal is adaptable to most any metal package type and application.”

The list of applicable products is expansive, from carbonated to still beverages, dry to wet foods, consumer goods and pharmaceuticals and to paint and other chemicals.

Cans using the CanReseal ends process, perform, ship and store like regular cans.

Whether made of metal or plastic, the CanReseal cap is designed specifically to meet the brand’s product requirements.

 

Readily adaptable and gaining traction

It is also easily integrated and manufacturable, highly marketable and differentiating and is economical.

What’s required for canmakers to do to manufacture CanReseal cans is to thread the interior of the can end near the top of the can to allow the reseal cap to be screwed down to create an air-tight seal. That positive seal is something overcaps can’t do, Zabaleta points out.

Canmakers would need a set of specialty changeparts for their existing machinery in order to do the threading, which is what Stolle is developing.

And in this eco-driven era, Canovation’s CanReseal is environmentally sustainable and easily recyclable as any standard can when a metal cap is used.

In development over the past months, the technology is poised to advance. “We are currently building up to enter our commercialization stage,” says Zabaleta.  “Stolle Machinery is leading the effort to finalize the development for the commercial version for the CanReseal all-metal, resealable beverage can for still (noncarbonated) applications. We anticipate this will be completed by this summer. We are also working with potential manufacturing and commercialization partners to manufacture the aforementioned beverage solution, hopefully by the end of 2020.”

What about brand interest?

“There are several major beverage and food brands that have expressed interest in the CanReseal container,” Zabaleta discloses. “A couple major beverage brands are in the process of testing the technology for commercial consideration.”

Concurrently, the company is beginning to work with Stolle to develop a resealable container for the rapidly-growing cannabis products market.

“Child Resistance and Dosing functionality can easily be designed into the CanReseal's cap, allowing our resealable cans to comply with current cannabis packaging regulations,” says Zabaleta. 

See the new CanReseal in person during WestPack 2020 (Feb. 11-13; Anaheim, CA) at the Cannabis Packaging Summit in Booth Level 3 Ballroom, as well during MetPack 2020 (May 5-9; Essen, Germany) in Hall 2, Stand 2A18.

____________________________________________________________________________________________

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Canovation’s patented end design can turn any metal food or beverage can into a resealable one, from carbonated beverages to wet foods to cannabis.
 

The cliché for inventive minds is to create a better mousetrap. If applied to packaging, the most obvious “mousetrap” that could benefit from inventive improvement may be the food or beverage can, made of tin-plated steel or aluminum, respectively.

Both are available universally for good reason: they remain go-to containers for food and beverages because they do the job—preserve the contents and do it reliably—and they are cheap.

In short, they are utilitarian as in being functionally ideal containers that—let’s face it—can be viewed as plain-old boring.

Plus there’s one thing metal cans can’t do, and that’s reseal. Once you open a food can you’ve got to store it in another container if you don’t finish it all, which is a universally accepted routine.

Perhaps no longer, which is part of the reason Canovation LLC believes it has a winner with CanReseal, a proprietary, internally-threaded end design that allows an end made of metal or plastic to be screwed into the top of the can and above the standard metal end, transforming the can into a resealable container after opening. All consumers do is remove the CanReseal end and, after opening the can as they usually do, then reapply the CanReseal cap to preserve the remaining contents.

Innovation adds resealability to food and beverage cans

Virtually any metal can of any size of can be adapted to the CanReseal design, according to the inventor, Daniel Zabaleta of Canovation. “CanReseal is adaptable to most any metal package type and application.”

The list of applicable products is expansive, from carbonated to still beverages, dry to wet foods, consumer goods and pharmaceuticals and to paint and other chemicals.

Cans using the CanReseal ends process, perform, ship and store like regular cans.

Whether made of metal or plastic, the CanReseal cap is designed specifically to meet the brand’s product requirements.

 

Readily adaptable and gaining traction

It is also easily integrated and manufacturable, highly marketable and differentiating and is economical.

What’s required for canmakers to do to manufacture CanReseal cans is to thread the interior of the can end near the top of the can to allow the reseal cap to be screwed down to create an air-tight seal. That positive seal is something overcaps can’t do, Zabaleta points out.

Canmakers would need a set of specialty changeparts for their existing machinery in order to do the threading, which is what Stolle is developing.

And in this eco-driven era, Canovation’s CanReseal is environmentally sustainable and easily recyclable as any standard can when a metal cap is used.

In development over the past months, the technology is poised to advance. “We are currently building up to enter our commercialization stage,” says Zabaleta.  “Stolle Machinery is leading the effort to finalize the development for the commercial version for the CanReseal all-metal, resealable beverage can for still (noncarbonated) applications. We anticipate this will be completed by this summer. We are also working with potential manufacturing and commercialization partners to manufacture the aforementioned beverage solution, hopefully by the end of 2020.”

What about brand interest?

“There are several major beverage and food brands that have expressed interest in the CanReseal container,” Zabaleta discloses. “A couple major beverage brands are in the process of testing the technology for commercial consideration.”

Concurrently, the company is beginning to work with Stolle to develop a resealable container for the rapidly-growing cannabis products market.

“Child Resistance and Dosing functionality can easily be designed into the CanReseal's cap, allowing our resealable cans to comply with current cannabis packaging regulations,” says Zabaleta. 

See the new CanReseal in person during WestPack 2020 (Feb. 11-13; Anaheim, CA) at the Cannabis Packaging Summit in Booth Level 3 Ballroom, as well during MetPack 2020 (May 5-9; Essen, Germany) in Hall 2, Stand 2A18.

____________________________________________________________________________________________

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Canovation’s patented end design can turn any metal food or beverage can into a resealable one, from carbonated beverages to wet foods to cannabis.
 

The cliché for inventive minds is to create a better mousetrap. If applied to packaging, the most obvious “mousetrap” that could benefit from inventive improvement may be the food or beverage can, made of tin-plated steel or aluminum, respectively.

Both are available universally for good reason: they remain go-to containers for food and beverages because they do the job—preserve the contents and do it reliably—and they are cheap.

In short, they are utilitarian as in being functionally ideal containers that—let’s face it—can be viewed as plain-old boring.

Plus there’s one thing metal cans can’t do, and that’s reseal. Once you open a food can you’ve got to store it in another container if you don’t finish it all, which is a universally accepted routine.

Perhaps no longer, which is part of the reason Canovation LLC believes it has a winner with CanReseal, a proprietary, internally-threaded end design that allows an end made of metal or plastic to be screwed into the top of the can and above the standard metal end, transforming the can into a resealable container after opening. All consumers do is remove the CanReseal end and, after opening the can as they usually do, then reapply the CanReseal cap to preserve the remaining contents.

Innovation adds resealability to food and beverage cans

Virtually any metal can of any size of can be adapted to the CanReseal design, according to the inventor, Daniel Zabaleta of Canovation. “CanReseal is adaptable to most any metal package type and application.”

The list of applicable products is expansive, from carbonated to still beverages, dry to wet foods, consumer goods and pharmaceuticals and to paint and other chemicals.

Cans using the CanReseal ends process, perform, ship and store like regular cans.

Whether made of metal or plastic, the CanReseal cap is designed specifically to meet the brand’s product requirements.

 

Readily adaptable and gaining traction

It is also easily integrated and manufacturable, highly marketable and differentiating and is economical.

What’s required for canmakers to do to manufacture CanReseal cans is to thread the interior of the can end near the top of the can to allow the reseal cap to be screwed down to create an air-tight seal. That positive seal is something overcaps can’t do, Zabaleta points out.

Canmakers would need a set of specialty changeparts for their existing machinery in order to do the threading, which is what Stolle is developing.

Innovation adds resealability to food and beverage cans

And in this eco-driven era, Canovation’s CanReseal is environmentally sustainable and easily recyclable as any standard can when a metal cap is used.

In development over the past months, the technology is poised to advance. “We are currently building up to enter our commercialization stage,” says Zabaleta.  “Stolle Machinery is leading the effort to finalize the development for the commercial version for the CanReseal all-metal, resealable beverage can for still (noncarbonated) applications. We anticipate this will be completed by this summer. We are also working with potential manufacturing and commercialization partners to manufacture the aforementioned beverage solution, hopefully by the end of 2020.”

What about brand interest?

“There are several major beverage and food brands that have expressed interest in the CanReseal container,” Zabaleta discloses. “A couple major beverage brands are in the process of testing the technology for commercial consideration.”

Concurrently, the company is beginning to work with Stolle to develop a resealable container for the rapidly-growing cannabis products market.

“Child Resistance and Dosing functionality can easily be designed into the CanReseal's cap, allowing our resealable cans to comply with current cannabis packaging regulations,” says Zabaleta. 

See the new CanReseal in person during WestPack 2020 (Feb. 11-13; Anaheim, CA) at the Cannabis Packaging Summit in Booth Level 3 Ballroom, as well during MetPack 2020 (May 5-9; Essen, Germany) in Hall 2, Stand 2A18.

____________________________________________________________________________________________

Fist-bumpFind your success! Subscribe to free Packaging Digest enewsletters.

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Array ( [post_title] => Innovation adds resealability to food and beverage cans [post_content] =>

Canovation’s patented end design can turn any metal food or beverage can into a resealable one, from carbonated beverages to wet foods to cannabis.
 

The cliché for inventive minds is to create a better mousetrap. If applied to packaging, the most obvious “mousetrap” that could benefit from inventive improvement may be the food or beverage can, made of tin-plated steel or aluminum, respectively.

Both are available universally for good reason: they remain go-to containers for food and beverages because they do the job—preserve the contents and do it reliably—and they are cheap.

In short, they are utilitarian as in being functionally ideal containers that—let’s face it—can be viewed as plain-old boring.

Plus there’s one thing metal cans can’t do, and that’s reseal. Once you open a food can you’ve got to store it in another container if you don’t finish it all, which is a universally accepted routine.

Perhaps no longer, which is part of the reason Canovation LLC believes it has a winner with CanReseal, a proprietary, internally-threaded end design that allows an end made of metal or plastic to be screwed into the top of the can and above the standard metal end, transforming the can into a resealable container after opening. All consumers do is remove the CanReseal end and, after opening the can as they usually do, then reapply the CanReseal cap to preserve the remaining contents.

Innovation adds resealability to food and beverage cans

Virtually any metal can of any size of can be adapted to the CanReseal design, according to the inventor, Daniel Zabaleta of Canovation. “CanReseal is adaptable to most any metal package type and application.”

The list of applicable products is expansive, from carbonated to still beverages, dry to wet foods, consumer goods and pharmaceuticals and to paint and other chemicals.

Cans using the CanReseal ends process, perform, ship and store like regular cans.

Whether made of metal or plastic, the CanReseal cap is designed specifically to meet the brand’s product requirements.

 

Readily adaptable and gaining traction

It is also easily integrated and manufacturable, highly marketable and differentiating and is economical.

What’s required for canmakers to do to manufacture CanReseal cans is to thread the interior of the can end near the top of the can to allow the reseal cap to be screwed down to create an air-tight seal. That positive seal is something overcaps can’t do, Zabaleta points out.

Canmakers would need a set of specialty changeparts for their existing machinery in order to do the threading, which is what Stolle is developing.

Innovation adds resealability to food and beverage cans

And in this eco-driven era, Canovation’s CanReseal is environmentally sustainable and easily recyclable as any standard can when a metal cap is used.

In development over the past months, the technology is poised to advance. “We are currently building up to enter our commercialization stage,” says Zabaleta.  “Stolle Machinery is leading the effort to finalize the development for the commercial version for the CanReseal all-metal, resealable beverage can for still (noncarbonated) applications. We anticipate this will be completed by this summer. We are also working with potential manufacturing and commercialization partners to manufacture the aforementioned beverage solution, hopefully by the end of 2020.”

What about brand interest?

“There are several major beverage and food brands that have expressed interest in the CanReseal container,” Zabaleta discloses. “A couple major beverage brands are in the process of testing the technology for commercial consideration.”

Concurrently, the company is beginning to work with Stolle to develop a resealable container for the rapidly-growing cannabis products market.

“Child Resistance and Dosing functionality can easily be designed into the CanReseal's cap, allowing our resealable cans to comply with current cannabis packaging regulations,” says Zabaleta. 

See the new CanReseal in person during WestPack 2020 (Feb. 11-13; Anaheim, CA) at the Cannabis Packaging Summit in Booth Level 3 Ballroom, as well during MetPack 2020 (May 5-9; Essen, Germany) in Hall 2, Stand 2A18.

____________________________________________________________________________________________

Innovation adds resealability to food and beverage cansFind your success! Subscribe to free Packaging Digest enewsletters.

[post_excerpt] => Canovation’s patented end design can turn any metal food or beverage can into a resealable one, from carbonated beverages to wet foods to cannabis. The cliché for inventive minds is to create a better mousetrap. If applied to packaging, the most obviou... [post_date_gmt] => 2020-02-06 21:09:20 [post_date] => 2020-02-06 21:09:20 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-02-06 21:09:20 [post_modified] => 2020-02-06 21:09:20 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => 29342 at https://www.packagingdigest.com [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => image/jpeg ) [syndication_source] => Packaging Digest [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.packagingdigest.com [syndication_source_id] => http://www.packagingdigest.com/rss.xml [syndication_feed] => http://www.packagingdigest.com/rss.xml [syndication_feed_id] => 109 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.packagingdigest.com/cans/innovation-adds-reseal-to-food-beverage-cans-2020-02-06 [syndication_item_hash] => ac02b6aefee0ff7e6c3230306c0ebfa9 [faf_featured_image] => 0 [faf_process_image] => 0,0,0,0 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 8266 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

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Kellogg’s Bear Naked cereal pouches embrace recyclability

Array ( [post_title] => Kellogg’s Bear Naked cereal pouches embrace recyclability [post_content] =>

Lead engineer Shannon Moore shares an insider’s view of the development including the considerations, what was learned, advice and more.

Consumers have always loved convenience in the packaged products they purchase and nowadays it’s important that packaging not only be recyclable, it should be convenient to recycle, too.

It’s something that Kellogg’s Solana Beach, CA-based Bear Naked Inc. granola company took seriously. After 18 months’ development the brand stakes a claim as the first fully recyclable stand-up barrier pouch made for food packaging that’s available nationwide. The previous pouch structure was recyclable, but the process wasn’t efficient or convenient: recycling required customers to sign up for a special program to ship the packaging for recycling; now, the packaging can be recycled using convenient at-store drop-off locations.

Kellogg’s lead packaging engineer, Shannon Moore, was deeply involved in the development in which the company worked with partners to develop a barrier recyclable film that could meet the brand’s technical and marketing requirements. Moore’s four years’ experience at the company followed 10 years’ work at Procter & Gamble that involved various roles in supply chain and package development on household and personal care brands.

The recyclable pouch rollout involves all of Bear Naked core product lines of granola and bites, according to Moore, some 13 product lines in all. “All of the granola has already converted over and we are currently in the process of rolling it out on our bites,” she tells Packaging Digest. The rest of our interview follows.

 

What’s this about?

Moore: Bear Naked granola wanted to increase their sustainability efforts within packaging by creating a more sustainable pouch. This required development of strategic partnerships across the value chain, from resin to manufacturing. Together, the team worked to design the Recycle Ready pouch for launch in 2019. This is just one part of the overall journey of sustainability for this brand and Kashi as part of Kellogg’s sustainability commitments for 2025.

 

How was the packaging changed?

Moore: The previous structure was a multilayer PET/polyethylene film. The new film is mono-material PE with ethylene vinyl alcohol barrier. The pouch size and the net weight did not change.

 

What were the marketing and technical considerations?

Moore: We surface print with a matte appearance and have a window on the front of the pouch. Marketing requirements meant that we had to ensure that these elements were maintained. We had to also maintain our existing shelf life in the new film, which appears on the pouch bottom.

 

 

How was the previous package disposed of and what’s done now?

Moore: The packaging was either sent to TerraCycle or landfilled. Now the film can be dropped off at stores and retailers into the store drop-off recycling stream. The pouches are printed with the How2Recycle label information, which appears along the back panel bottom next to a “Recycle Ready” callout.

 

Next: Vendors, challenges, lessons learned, advice

Vendors Berry Global (film), Fresh-Lock (zipper), Dow (resins) and ColorMasters (printing/converting) were all involved…how unusual is this?

Moore: Our manufacturing partner Hearthside Foods was involved on this from a production standpoint. I led the team collaboration with the vendors, which included in-person on-site development work both at Kellogg’s, the suppliers and at Dow. This is atypical of a packaging change project because for this project we involved the resin supplier.

 

What else was different about the project?

Moore: It was managed end-to-end from the resin manufacturing all the way through to the transportation and customer involvement. It involved a lot of collaboration and partnership between the different players depending on their place in the supply chain.

 

What was the biggest challenge?

Moore: Compatibility of the film with our existing equipment and ensuring that we maintained the same look and feel of the brand.

 

Please comment on the R&D timetable.

Moore:  The project took about 18 months’ time; validation and shelf-life testing took the longest portion of that time.

 

What’s been the reception?

Moore: It has been positive feedback. The pouch was the recipient of the 2019 Technology Excellence Award in Snack and Bakery during Pack Expo in September 2019. In January 2020, the pouch was chosen for a Silver Award in Sustainability in the Flexible Packaging Assn.’s 2020 FPA Achievement Awards

 

What’s a lesson learned you can share?

Moore: Involvement and engagement from all parts of the material spectrum is very important when designing for sustainability.

 

What advice do you have for other brands and engineers working in flexible packaging?

Moore: With regards to sustainable packaging—there is no one size fits all, it’s really important to understand your consumers’ needs, the level of understanding they have around sustainable packaging and what your vendor partners capabilities are. Also, having a good understanding of the recycling infrastructure in your area or country is important from a design aspect.

 

What was the most personally gratifying experience from this project?

Moore: Being able to be a part of an important goal for the brand and being able to see it from initial ideation to launch.

 

Final thoughts?

Moore: This was a very intense project to lead, but if you were to ask anyone on the team, the one theme you would hear is that everyone gained a deep knowledge about another area of the packaging value chain that they didn’t have previously. We will all use the experience to help further sustainable packaging design in future project work.

 

 

 
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Replacing images : - ON

Lead engineer Shannon Moore shares an insider’s view of the development including the considerations, what was learned, advice and more.

Consumers have always loved convenience in the packaged products they purchase and nowadays it’s important that packaging not only be recyclable, it should be convenient to recycle, too.

It’s something that Kellogg’s Solana Beach, CA-based Bear Naked Inc. granola company took seriously. After 18 months’ development the brand stakes a claim as the first fully recyclable stand-up barrier pouch made for food packaging that’s available nationwide. The previous pouch structure was recyclable, but the process wasn’t efficient or convenient: recycling required customers to sign up for a special program to ship the packaging for recycling; now, the packaging can be recycled using convenient at-store drop-off locations.

Kellogg’s lead packaging engineer, Shannon Moore, was deeply involved in the development in which the company worked with partners to develop a barrier recyclable film that could meet the brand’s technical and marketing requirements. Moore’s four years’ experience at the company followed 10 years’ work at Procter & Gamble that involved various roles in supply chain and package development on household and personal care brands.

The recyclable pouch rollout involves all of Bear Naked core product lines of granola and bites, according to Moore, some 13 product lines in all. “All of the granola has already converted over and we are currently in the process of rolling it out on our bites,” she tells Packaging Digest. The rest of our interview follows.

 

What’s this about?

Moore: Bear Naked granola wanted to increase their sustainability efforts within packaging by creating a more sustainable pouch. This required development of strategic partnerships across the value chain, from resin to manufacturing. Together, the team worked to design the Recycle Ready pouch for launch in 2019. This is just one part of the overall journey of sustainability for this brand and Kashi as part of Kellogg’s sustainability commitments for 2025.

 

How was the packaging changed?

Moore: The previous structure was a multilayer PET/polyethylene film. The new film is mono-material PE with ethylene vinyl alcohol barrier. The pouch size and the net weight did not change.

 

What were the marketing and technical considerations?

Moore: We surface print with a matte appearance and have a window on the front of the pouch. Marketing requirements meant that we had to ensure that these elements were maintained. We had to also maintain our existing shelf life in the new film, which appears on the pouch bottom.

 

 

How was the previous package disposed of and what’s done now?

Moore: The packaging was either sent to TerraCycle or landfilled. Now the film can be dropped off at stores and retailers into the store drop-off recycling stream. The pouches are printed with the How2Recycle label information, which appears along the back panel bottom next to a “Recycle Ready” callout.

 

Next: Vendors, challenges, lessons learned, advice

Vendors Berry Global (film), Fresh-Lock (zipper), Dow (resins) and ColorMasters (printing/converting) were all involved…how unusual is this?

Moore: Our manufacturing partner Hearthside Foods was involved on this from a production standpoint. I led the team collaboration with the vendors, which included in-person on-site development work both at Kellogg’s, the suppliers and at Dow. This is atypical of a packaging change project because for this project we involved the resin supplier.

 

What else was different about the project?

Moore: It was managed end-to-end from the resin manufacturing all the way through to the transportation and customer involvement. It involved a lot of collaboration and partnership between the different players depending on their place in the supply chain.

 

What was the biggest challenge?

Moore: Compatibility of the film with our existing equipment and ensuring that we maintained the same look and feel of the brand.

 

Please comment on the R&D timetable.

Moore:  The project took about 18 months’ time; validation and shelf-life testing took the longest portion of that time.

 

What’s been the reception?

Moore: It has been positive feedback. The pouch was the recipient of the 2019 Technology Excellence Award in Snack and Bakery during Pack Expo in September 2019. In January 2020, the pouch was chosen for a Silver Award in Sustainability in the Flexible Packaging Assn.’s 2020 FPA Achievement Awards

 

What’s a lesson learned you can share?

Moore: Involvement and engagement from all parts of the material spectrum is very important when designing for sustainability.

 

What advice do you have for other brands and engineers working in flexible packaging?

Moore: With regards to sustainable packaging—there is no one size fits all, it’s really important to understand your consumers’ needs, the level of understanding they have around sustainable packaging and what your vendor partners capabilities are. Also, having a good understanding of the recycling infrastructure in your area or country is important from a design aspect.

 

What was the most personally gratifying experience from this project?

Moore: Being able to be a part of an important goal for the brand and being able to see it from initial ideation to launch.

 

Final thoughts?

Moore: This was a very intense project to lead, but if you were to ask anyone on the team, the one theme you would hear is that everyone gained a deep knowledge about another area of the packaging value chain that they didn’t have previously. We will all use the experience to help further sustainable packaging design in future project work.

 

 

 

Local save:https://www.packagingdigest.com/sites/default/files/styles/featured_image_750x422/public/Bear-Naked-Recycle-Group-PD.jpg?itok=p3QQBI0U

Image process :: Saving local image

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Image exists, checking for same file size

Replacing images : - ON

Lead engineer Shannon Moore shares an insider’s view of the development including the considerations, what was learned, advice and more.

Consumers have always loved convenience in the packaged products they purchase and nowadays it’s important that packaging not only be recyclable, it should be convenient to recycle, too.

It’s something that Kellogg’s Solana Beach, CA-based Bear Naked Inc. granola company took seriously. After 18 months’ development the brand stakes a claim as the first fully recyclable stand-up barrier pouch made for food packaging that’s available nationwide. The previous pouch structure was recyclable, but the process wasn’t efficient or convenient: recycling required customers to sign up for a special program to ship the packaging for recycling; now, the packaging can be recycled using convenient at-store drop-off locations.

Kellogg’s lead packaging engineer, Shannon Moore, was deeply involved in the development in which the company worked with partners to develop a barrier recyclable film that could meet the brand’s technical and marketing requirements. Moore’s four years’ experience at the company followed 10 years’ work at Procter & Gamble that involved various roles in supply chain and package development on household and personal care brands.

The recyclable pouch rollout involves all of Bear Naked core product lines of granola and bites, according to Moore, some 13 product lines in all. “All of the granola has already converted over and we are currently in the process of rolling it out on our bites,” she tells Packaging Digest. The rest of our interview follows.

 

What’s this about?

Moore: Bear Naked granola wanted to increase their sustainability efforts within packaging by creating a more sustainable pouch. This required development of strategic partnerships across the value chain, from resin to manufacturing. Together, the team worked to design the Recycle Ready pouch for launch in 2019. This is just one part of the overall journey of sustainability for this brand and Kashi as part of Kellogg’s sustainability commitments for 2025.

 

How was the packaging changed?

Moore: The previous structure was a multilayer PET/polyethylene film. The new film is mono-material PE with ethylene vinyl alcohol barrier. The pouch size and the net weight did not change.

 

What were the marketing and technical considerations?

Moore: We surface print with a matte appearance and have a window on the front of the pouch. Marketing requirements meant that we had to ensure that these elements were maintained. We had to also maintain our existing shelf life in the new film, which appears on the pouch bottom.

 

Kellogg’s Bear Naked cereal pouches embrace recyclability

 

How was the previous package disposed of and what’s done now?

Moore: The packaging was either sent to TerraCycle or landfilled. Now the film can be dropped off at stores and retailers into the store drop-off recycling stream. The pouches are printed with the How2Recycle label information, which appears along the back panel bottom next to a “Recycle Ready” callout.

 

Next: Vendors, challenges, lessons learned, advice

Vendors Berry Global (film), Fresh-Lock (zipper), Dow (resins) and ColorMasters (printing/converting) were all involved…how unusual is this?

Moore: Our manufacturing partner Hearthside Foods was involved on this from a production standpoint. I led the team collaboration with the vendors, which included in-person on-site development work both at Kellogg’s, the suppliers and at Dow. This is atypical of a packaging change project because for this project we involved the resin supplier.

 

What else was different about the project?

Moore: It was managed end-to-end from the resin manufacturing all the way through to the transportation and customer involvement. It involved a lot of collaboration and partnership between the different players depending on their place in the supply chain.

 

What was the biggest challenge?

Moore: Compatibility of the film with our existing equipment and ensuring that we maintained the same look and feel of the brand.

 

Please comment on the R&D timetable.

Moore:  The project took about 18 months’ time; validation and shelf-life testing took the longest portion of that time.

 

What’s been the reception?

Moore: It has been positive feedback. The pouch was the recipient of the 2019 Technology Excellence Award in Snack and Bakery during Pack Expo in September 2019. In January 2020, the pouch was chosen for a Silver Award in Sustainability in the Flexible Packaging Assn.’s 2020 FPA Achievement Awards

 

What’s a lesson learned you can share?

Moore: Involvement and engagement from all parts of the material spectrum is very important when designing for sustainability.

 

What advice do you have for other brands and engineers working in flexible packaging?

Moore: With regards to sustainable packaging—there is no one size fits all, it’s really important to understand your consumers’ needs, the level of understanding they have around sustainable packaging and what your vendor partners capabilities are. Also, having a good understanding of the recycling infrastructure in your area or country is important from a design aspect.

 

What was the most personally gratifying experience from this project?

Moore: Being able to be a part of an important goal for the brand and being able to see it from initial ideation to launch.

 

Final thoughts?

Moore: This was a very intense project to lead, but if you were to ask anyone on the team, the one theme you would hear is that everyone gained a deep knowledge about another area of the packaging value chain that they didn’t have previously. We will all use the experience to help further sustainable packaging design in future project work.

 

 

 

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Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :Kellogg’s Bear Naked cereal pouches embrace recyclability

Array ( [post_title] => Kellogg’s Bear Naked cereal pouches embrace recyclability [post_content] =>

Lead engineer Shannon Moore shares an insider’s view of the development including the considerations, what was learned, advice and more.

Consumers have always loved convenience in the packaged products they purchase and nowadays it’s important that packaging not only be recyclable, it should be convenient to recycle, too.

It’s something that Kellogg’s Solana Beach, CA-based Bear Naked Inc. granola company took seriously. After 18 months’ development the brand stakes a claim as the first fully recyclable stand-up barrier pouch made for food packaging that’s available nationwide. The previous pouch structure was recyclable, but the process wasn’t efficient or convenient: recycling required customers to sign up for a special program to ship the packaging for recycling; now, the packaging can be recycled using convenient at-store drop-off locations.

Kellogg’s lead packaging engineer, Shannon Moore, was deeply involved in the development in which the company worked with partners to develop a barrier recyclable film that could meet the brand’s technical and marketing requirements. Moore’s four years’ experience at the company followed 10 years’ work at Procter & Gamble that involved various roles in supply chain and package development on household and personal care brands.

The recyclable pouch rollout involves all of Bear Naked core product lines of granola and bites, according to Moore, some 13 product lines in all. “All of the granola has already converted over and we are currently in the process of rolling it out on our bites,” she tells Packaging Digest. The rest of our interview follows.

 

What’s this about?

Moore: Bear Naked granola wanted to increase their sustainability efforts within packaging by creating a more sustainable pouch. This required development of strategic partnerships across the value chain, from resin to manufacturing. Together, the team worked to design the Recycle Ready pouch for launch in 2019. This is just one part of the overall journey of sustainability for this brand and Kashi as part of Kellogg’s sustainability commitments for 2025.

 

How was the packaging changed?

Moore: The previous structure was a multilayer PET/polyethylene film. The new film is mono-material PE with ethylene vinyl alcohol barrier. The pouch size and the net weight did not change.

 

What were the marketing and technical considerations?

Moore: We surface print with a matte appearance and have a window on the front of the pouch. Marketing requirements meant that we had to ensure that these elements were maintained. We had to also maintain our existing shelf life in the new film, which appears on the pouch bottom.

 

Kellogg’s Bear Naked cereal pouches embrace recyclability

 

How was the previous package disposed of and what’s done now?

Moore: The packaging was either sent to TerraCycle or landfilled. Now the film can be dropped off at stores and retailers into the store drop-off recycling stream. The pouches are printed with the How2Recycle label information, which appears along the back panel bottom next to a “Recycle Ready” callout.

 

Next: Vendors, challenges, lessons learned, advice

Vendors Berry Global (film), Fresh-Lock (zipper), Dow (resins) and ColorMasters (printing/converting) were all involved…how unusual is this?

Moore: Our manufacturing partner Hearthside Foods was involved on this from a production standpoint. I led the team collaboration with the vendors, which included in-person on-site development work both at Kellogg’s, the suppliers and at Dow. This is atypical of a packaging change project because for this project we involved the resin supplier.

 

What else was different about the project?

Moore: It was managed end-to-end from the resin manufacturing all the way through to the transportation and customer involvement. It involved a lot of collaboration and partnership between the different players depending on their place in the supply chain.

 Kellogg’s Bear Naked cereal pouches embrace recyclability

What was the biggest challenge?

Moore: Compatibility of the film with our existing equipment and ensuring that we maintained the same look and feel of the brand.

 

Please comment on the R&D timetable.

Moore:  The project took about 18 months’ time; validation and shelf-life testing took the longest portion of that time.

 

What’s been the reception?

Moore: It has been positive feedback. The pouch was the recipient of the 2019 Technology Excellence Award in Snack and Bakery during Pack Expo in September 2019. In January 2020, the pouch was chosen for a Silver Award in Sustainability in the Flexible Packaging Assn.’s 2020 FPA Achievement Awards

 

What’s a lesson learned you can share?

Moore: Involvement and engagement from all parts of the material spectrum is very important when designing for sustainability.

 

What advice do you have for other brands and engineers working in flexible packaging?

Moore: With regards to sustainable packaging—there is no one size fits all, it’s really important to understand your consumers’ needs, the level of understanding they have around sustainable packaging and what your vendor partners capabilities are. Also, having a good understanding of the recycling infrastructure in your area or country is important from a design aspect.

 

What was the most personally gratifying experience from this project?

Moore: Being able to be a part of an important goal for the brand and being able to see it from initial ideation to launch.

 

Final thoughts?

Moore: This was a very intense project to lead, but if you were to ask anyone on the team, the one theme you would hear is that everyone gained a deep knowledge about another area of the packaging value chain that they didn’t have previously. We will all use the experience to help further sustainable packaging design in future project work.

 

 

 
[post_excerpt] => Lead engineer Shannon Moore shares an insider’s view of the development including the considerations, what was learned, advice and more.Consumers have always loved convenience in the packaged products they purchase and nowadays it’s important that pack... [post_date_gmt] => 2020-02-06 19:04:24 [post_date] => 2020-02-06 19:04:24 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-02-06 19:04:24 [post_modified] => 2020-02-06 19:04:24 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => 29341 at https://www.packagingdigest.com [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => image/jpeg ) [syndication_source] => Packaging Digest [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.packagingdigest.com [syndication_source_id] => http://www.packagingdigest.com/rss.xml [syndication_feed] => http://www.packagingdigest.com/rss.xml [syndication_feed_id] => 109 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.packagingdigest.com/pouches/kelloggs-makes-bear-naked-pouches-recyclable-2020-02-06 [syndication_item_hash] => 29bfa7d886d62d5310db98d15a4f8bf7 [faf_featured_image] => 0 [faf_process_image] => 0,0,0 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 8266 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

FAF deciding on filters on post to be syndicated:

Integrated tray-former/wrapper turbo charges retail-ready packs

Array ( [post_title] => Integrated tray-former/wrapper turbo charges retail-ready packs [post_content] =>

Food companies looking to automate their retail-ready packaging operation now have the option for a total solution that delivers speeds as high as 40 trays per minute, with the appropriate infeed.

At WestPack 2020 (Feb. 11-13; Anaheim, CA), two Pro Mach companies will demonstrate a new integrated system that combines an automatic tray former with an intermittent-motion sealer that feeds into an energy-efficient shrink tunnel.

Wexxar-Bel’s IPAK TF200 tray former mates with Texwrap’s 2219 L-sealer, which then passes filled and wrapped trays into a Texwrap 1322 Single-Chamber Forced Air Convection Tunnel at a pretty healthy clip. Conveyor speeds reach up to 100 feet per minute.

The combined machines are not limited to retail-ready packs for food companies, as they are also suitable for other markets and other secondary packaging operations.

Sporting a compact footprint, the four-corner tray former’s mandrel and compression configurations allow it to create a variety of trays, including those with more complex designs, such as telescoping lids, triangulated corners or retail-ready display designs (see photo at top of page).

The 2219 intermittent-motion L-sealer wraps up to 40 trays per minute.

 

According to the company, the proper product infeed along with Texwrap’s exclusive Motion Trim technology and its high conveyor speed makes the 2219 the fastest L-sealer on the market today.

Lastly, the Texwrap 1322 single-chamber forced air convection heat tunnel digitally controls temperatures, and provides separate top and bottom controls for the air, which comes from high velocity fans. This ensures the right amount of heat is applied to the right places for the right amount of time.

See this integrated system from Wexxar Bel and Texwrap in person in Booth 5221 at WestPack 2020. Register now to attend.

____________________________________________________________________________________________

Fist-bumpFind your success! Subscribe to free Packaging Digest enewsletters.

[post_excerpt] => Food companies looking to automate their retail-ready packaging operation now have the option for a total solution that delivers speeds as high as 40 trays per minute, with the appropriate infeed.At WestPack 2020 (Feb. 11-13; Anaheim, CA), two Pro Mach... [post_date_gmt] => 2020-02-06 16:47:14 [post_date] => 2020-02-06 16:47:14 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-02-06 16:47:14 [post_modified] => 2020-02-06 16:47:14 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => 29340 at https://www.packagingdigest.com [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => https://www.packagingdigest.com/sites/default/files/Texwrap 2219 shrink wrapper-72dpi.jpg image/jpeg ) [syndication_source] => Packaging Digest [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.packagingdigest.com [syndication_source_id] => http://www.packagingdigest.com/rss.xml [syndication_feed] => http://www.packagingdigest.com/rss.xml [syndication_feed_id] => 109 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.packagingdigest.com/retail-packaging/integrated-tray-former-wrapper-turbo-charges-retail-ready-packs-2020-02-06 [syndication_item_hash] => 6364b913df844a248892f3b3eb0c644b ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 8266 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

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Image exists, checking for same file size

Replacing images : - ON

Food companies looking to automate their retail-ready packaging operation now have the option for a total solution that delivers speeds as high as 40 trays per minute, with the appropriate infeed.

At WestPack 2020 (Feb. 11-13; Anaheim, CA), two Pro Mach companies will demonstrate a new integrated system that combines an automatic tray former with an intermittent-motion sealer that feeds into an energy-efficient shrink tunnel.

Wexxar-Bel’s IPAK TF200 tray former mates with Texwrap’s 2219 L-sealer, which then passes filled and wrapped trays into a Texwrap 1322 Single-Chamber Forced Air Convection Tunnel at a pretty healthy clip. Conveyor speeds reach up to 100 feet per minute.

The combined machines are not limited to retail-ready packs for food companies, as they are also suitable for other markets and other secondary packaging operations.

Sporting a compact footprint, the four-corner tray former’s mandrel and compression configurations allow it to create a variety of trays, including those with more complex designs, such as telescoping lids, triangulated corners or retail-ready display designs (see photo at top of page).

The 2219 intermittent-motion L-sealer wraps up to 40 trays per minute.

 

According to the company, the proper product infeed along with Texwrap’s exclusive Motion Trim technology and its high conveyor speed makes the 2219 the fastest L-sealer on the market today.

Lastly, the Texwrap 1322 single-chamber forced air convection heat tunnel digitally controls temperatures, and provides separate top and bottom controls for the air, which comes from high velocity fans. This ensures the right amount of heat is applied to the right places for the right amount of time.

See this integrated system from Wexxar Bel and Texwrap in person in Booth 5221 at WestPack 2020. Register now to attend.

____________________________________________________________________________________________

Fist-bumpFind your success! Subscribe to free Packaging Digest enewsletters.

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Image exists, checking for same file size

Replacing images : Fist-bump - Fist-bump ON

Food companies looking to automate their retail-ready packaging operation now have the option for a total solution that delivers speeds as high as 40 trays per minute, with the appropriate infeed.

At WestPack 2020 (Feb. 11-13; Anaheim, CA), two Pro Mach companies will demonstrate a new integrated system that combines an automatic tray former with an intermittent-motion sealer that feeds into an energy-efficient shrink tunnel.

Wexxar-Bel’s IPAK TF200 tray former mates with Texwrap’s 2219 L-sealer, which then passes filled and wrapped trays into a Texwrap 1322 Single-Chamber Forced Air Convection Tunnel at a pretty healthy clip. Conveyor speeds reach up to 100 feet per minute.

The combined machines are not limited to retail-ready packs for food companies, as they are also suitable for other markets and other secondary packaging operations.

Sporting a compact footprint, the four-corner tray former’s mandrel and compression configurations allow it to create a variety of trays, including those with more complex designs, such as telescoping lids, triangulated corners or retail-ready display designs (see photo at top of page).

Integrated tray-former/wrapper turbo charges retail-ready packs

The 2219 intermittent-motion L-sealer wraps up to 40 trays per minute.

 

According to the company, the proper product infeed along with Texwrap’s exclusive Motion Trim technology and its high conveyor speed makes the 2219 the fastest L-sealer on the market today.

Lastly, the Texwrap 1322 single-chamber forced air convection heat tunnel digitally controls temperatures, and provides separate top and bottom controls for the air, which comes from high velocity fans. This ensures the right amount of heat is applied to the right places for the right amount of time.

See this integrated system from Wexxar Bel and Texwrap in person in Booth 5221 at WestPack 2020. Register now to attend.

____________________________________________________________________________________________

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Food companies looking to automate their retail-ready packaging operation now have the option for a total solution that delivers speeds as high as 40 trays per minute, with the appropriate infeed.

At WestPack 2020 (Feb. 11-13; Anaheim, CA), two Pro Mach companies will demonstrate a new integrated system that combines an automatic tray former with an intermittent-motion sealer that feeds into an energy-efficient shrink tunnel.

Wexxar-Bel’s IPAK TF200 tray former mates with Texwrap’s 2219 L-sealer, which then passes filled and wrapped trays into a Texwrap 1322 Single-Chamber Forced Air Convection Tunnel at a pretty healthy clip. Conveyor speeds reach up to 100 feet per minute.

The combined machines are not limited to retail-ready packs for food companies, as they are also suitable for other markets and other secondary packaging operations.

Sporting a compact footprint, the four-corner tray former’s mandrel and compression configurations allow it to create a variety of trays, including those with more complex designs, such as telescoping lids, triangulated corners or retail-ready display designs (see photo at top of page).

Integrated tray-former/wrapper turbo charges retail-ready packs

The 2219 intermittent-motion L-sealer wraps up to 40 trays per minute.

 

According to the company, the proper product infeed along with Texwrap’s exclusive Motion Trim technology and its high conveyor speed makes the 2219 the fastest L-sealer on the market today.

Lastly, the Texwrap 1322 single-chamber forced air convection heat tunnel digitally controls temperatures, and provides separate top and bottom controls for the air, which comes from high velocity fans. This ensures the right amount of heat is applied to the right places for the right amount of time.

See this integrated system from Wexxar Bel and Texwrap in person in Booth 5221 at WestPack 2020. Register now to attend.

____________________________________________________________________________________________

Integrated tray-former/wrapper turbo charges retail-ready packsFind your success! Subscribe to free Packaging Digest enewsletters.

[post_excerpt] => Food companies looking to automate their retail-ready packaging operation now have the option for a total solution that delivers speeds as high as 40 trays per minute, with the appropriate infeed.At WestPack 2020 (Feb. 11-13; Anaheim, CA), two Pro Mach... [post_date_gmt] => 2020-02-06 16:47:14 [post_date] => 2020-02-06 16:47:14 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-02-06 16:47:14 [post_modified] => 2020-02-06 16:47:14 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => 29340 at https://www.packagingdigest.com [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => image/jpeg ) [syndication_source] => Packaging Digest [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.packagingdigest.com [syndication_source_id] => http://www.packagingdigest.com/rss.xml [syndication_feed] => http://www.packagingdigest.com/rss.xml [syndication_feed_id] => 109 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.packagingdigest.com/retail-packaging/integrated-tray-former-wrapper-turbo-charges-retail-ready-packs-2020-02-06 [syndication_item_hash] => 6364b913df844a248892f3b3eb0c644b [faf_featured_image] => 0 [faf_process_image] => 0,0,0 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 8266 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

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Colgate launches Smile for Good toothpaste in recyclable tube

Array ( [post_title] => Colgate launches Smile for Good toothpaste in recyclable tube [post_content] =>

Demonstrating its continued commitment to increasing packaging sustainability, Colgate-Palmolive Co. is launching its new Smile for Good toothpaste brand in the recyclable high-density polyethylene (HDPE) tube the company introduced last year. The Smile for Good brand is currently rolling out in Europe.

Late last year, the company introduced Tom’s of Maine Antiplaque & Whitening toothpaste in the recyclable tube. The tube reboots toothpaste packaging design by replacing non-recyclable laminate materials with a squeezable material made entirely from HDPE—which is, of course, readily recyclable.

Toms-of-Maine-recyclable-tube

The package is the first tube to be recognized by The Assn. of Plastic Recyclers in North America and RecyClass in Europe. Colgate is sharing its tube technology with tube makers and competitors to support a shift to recyclable tubes that meet regional recycling standards for toothpaste and other products. The Smile for Good launch marks Colgate’s first use of the recyclable tube in Europe.

The tube’s recyclability attribute is a good fit for the Smile for Good brand, which contains a minimal number of ingredients and lists all ingredients, with their purpose/benefit, on the carton’s front panel. The product and/or packaging have been certified by Ecocert, the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), and the United Kingdom’s Vegan Society.

Tom Heaslip, worldwide director, Category Packaging/Global Design & Packaging, Colgate-Palmolive, answers a few questions from Packaging Digest about Smile for Good and its packaging.

 

When will the Smile for Good toothpaste brand launch?

Heaslip: The Smile for Good launch is currently happening across Europe; it is already available in the United Kingdom, Italy and Poland. This follows the launch of the tube for certain Tom’s of Maine flavors in the United States last fall, which are also continuing to roll out.

 

Please describe the Smile for Good packaging components.

Heaslip: The new tube design, as well as the shoulder, are made with HDPE with ethylene vinyl alcohol (EVOH), and includes a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) flavor insert. The cap is made of polypropylene (PP), and plans are underway for a conversion to a polyethylene (PE) cap. The carton is made with recycled board.

 

Are all the Smile for Good packaging components recyclable?

Heaslip: From a technical standpoint, yes, though at this point it is likely that the PET flavor insert will become yield loss at the reprocessor and we are working to address that. Actual recycling will continue to rely on the available infrastructure and reprocessing capabilities in each geography. We recognize that we have a responsibility to lead and are at the start of a journey. There is much work to be done. We’re engaging to build awareness and support among all recycling stakeholders: the materials recovery facilities that sort recyclables, the reclaimers that produce resin from recycled plastic, the municipalities that operate recycling programs, and others.

 

Does the Smile for Good packaging provide recycling instructions for consumers?

Heaslip: With a launch across different countries of Europe, we needed to keep it simple: “Recyclable Carton” and “Recyclable Tube.”

 

How are the tubes decorated?

Heaslip: The tubes are flexo printed.

____________________________________________________________________________________________

WestPack-2020  WestPack 2020: Ideas. Education. New Partners. Feb. 11-13

____________________________________________________________________________________________

Why did Colgate choose to print the product’s ingredients on the carton’s front panel, especially in a category that competes fiercely on-shelf with dynamic packaging designs, holograms, foil and the like?

Heaslip: We believe that people should have the chance to make an informed decision about the ingredients in the products they choose. Colgate’s Smile for Good Toothpaste sets a new standard for ingredient transparency by listing ingredients on the front panel and explaining each ingredient’s purpose in simple language. Similarly, we’ve started a project to reveal our ingredients on our website.

 

Is the carton kraft, or is it printed that color? Why did you choose this look for the Smile for Good brand?

Heaslip: It is kraft and meant to be in line with the idea of natural, ingredient simplicity and transparency.

Colgate-recyclable-tube

Is Colgate making the tubes in-house? If not, who supplies them?

Heaslip: The Smile for Good tube is supplied by Albéa, using Colgate’s Samson technology as recognized as recyclable by The Assn. of Plastic Recyclers and RecyClass. We’re now installing equipment at our plants to make the new tubes, but we wanted to get started on the transition. We’re committed to making all of our packaging reusable, recyclable or compostable by 2025.

____________________________________________________________________________________________

Fist-bumpFind your success! Subscribe to free Packaging Digest enewsletters.

[post_excerpt] => Demonstrating its continued commitment to increasing packaging sustainability, Colgate-Palmolive Co. is launching its new Smile for Good toothpaste brand in the recyclable high-density polyethylene (HDPE) tube the company introduced last year. The Smil... [post_date_gmt] => 2020-02-05 22:50:32 [post_date] => 2020-02-05 22:50:32 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-02-05 22:50:32 [post_modified] => 2020-02-05 22:50:32 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => 29339 at https://www.packagingdigest.com [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => https://www.packagingdigest.com/sites/default/files/Colgate Tom's of Maine Tube-72dpi.jpg image/jpeg ) [syndication_source] => Packaging Digest [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.packagingdigest.com [syndication_source_id] => http://www.packagingdigest.com/rss.xml [syndication_feed] => http://www.packagingdigest.com/rss.xml [syndication_feed_id] => 109 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.packagingdigest.com/sustainable-packaging/colgate-launches-smile-for-good-toothpaste-in-recyclable-tube-2020-02-05 [syndication_item_hash] => 52efc740044d77b449dce19c69783880 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 8266 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

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Image exists, checking for same file size

Replacing images : Toms-of-Maine-recyclable-tube - Toms-of-Maine-recyclable-tube ON

Demonstrating its continued commitment to increasing packaging sustainability, Colgate-Palmolive Co. is launching its new Smile for Good toothpaste brand in the recyclable high-density polyethylene (HDPE) tube the company introduced last year. The Smile for Good brand is currently rolling out in Europe.

Late last year, the company introduced Tom’s of Maine Antiplaque & Whitening toothpaste in the recyclable tube. The tube reboots toothpaste packaging design by replacing non-recyclable laminate materials with a squeezable material made entirely from HDPE—which is, of course, readily recyclable.

Toms-of-Maine-recyclable-tube

The package is the first tube to be recognized by The Assn. of Plastic Recyclers in North America and RecyClass in Europe. Colgate is sharing its tube technology with tube makers and competitors to support a shift to recyclable tubes that meet regional recycling standards for toothpaste and other products. The Smile for Good launch marks Colgate’s first use of the recyclable tube in Europe.

The tube’s recyclability attribute is a good fit for the Smile for Good brand, which contains a minimal number of ingredients and lists all ingredients, with their purpose/benefit, on the carton’s front panel. The product and/or packaging have been certified by Ecocert, the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), and the United Kingdom’s Vegan Society.

Tom Heaslip, worldwide director, Category Packaging/Global Design & Packaging, Colgate-Palmolive, answers a few questions from Packaging Digest about Smile for Good and its packaging.

 

When will the Smile for Good toothpaste brand launch?

Heaslip: The Smile for Good launch is currently happening across Europe; it is already available in the United Kingdom, Italy and Poland. This follows the launch of the tube for certain Tom’s of Maine flavors in the United States last fall, which are also continuing to roll out.

 

Please describe the Smile for Good packaging components.

Heaslip: The new tube design, as well as the shoulder, are made with HDPE with ethylene vinyl alcohol (EVOH), and includes a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) flavor insert. The cap is made of polypropylene (PP), and plans are underway for a conversion to a polyethylene (PE) cap. The carton is made with recycled board.

 

Are all the Smile for Good packaging components recyclable?

Heaslip: From a technical standpoint, yes, though at this point it is likely that the PET flavor insert will become yield loss at the reprocessor and we are working to address that. Actual recycling will continue to rely on the available infrastructure and reprocessing capabilities in each geography. We recognize that we have a responsibility to lead and are at the start of a journey. There is much work to be done. We’re engaging to build awareness and support among all recycling stakeholders: the materials recovery facilities that sort recyclables, the reclaimers that produce resin from recycled plastic, the municipalities that operate recycling programs, and others.

 

Does the Smile for Good packaging provide recycling instructions for consumers?

Heaslip: With a launch across different countries of Europe, we needed to keep it simple: “Recyclable Carton” and “Recyclable Tube.”

 

How are the tubes decorated?

Heaslip: The tubes are flexo printed.

____________________________________________________________________________________________

WestPack-2020  WestPack 2020: Ideas. Education. New Partners. Feb. 11-13

____________________________________________________________________________________________

Why did Colgate choose to print the product’s ingredients on the carton’s front panel, especially in a category that competes fiercely on-shelf with dynamic packaging designs, holograms, foil and the like?

Heaslip: We believe that people should have the chance to make an informed decision about the ingredients in the products they choose. Colgate’s Smile for Good Toothpaste sets a new standard for ingredient transparency by listing ingredients on the front panel and explaining each ingredient’s purpose in simple language. Similarly, we’ve started a project to reveal our ingredients on our website.

 

Is the carton kraft, or is it printed that color? Why did you choose this look for the Smile for Good brand?

Heaslip: It is kraft and meant to be in line with the idea of natural, ingredient simplicity and transparency.

Colgate-recyclable-tube

Is Colgate making the tubes in-house? If not, who supplies them?

Heaslip: The Smile for Good tube is supplied by Albéa, using Colgate’s Samson technology as recognized as recyclable by The Assn. of Plastic Recyclers and RecyClass. We’re now installing equipment at our plants to make the new tubes, but we wanted to get started on the transition. We’re committed to making all of our packaging reusable, recyclable or compostable by 2025.

____________________________________________________________________________________________

Fist-bumpFind your success! Subscribe to free Packaging Digest enewsletters.

Local save:https://westpack.packagingdigest.com/sites/default/files/home-is-859050944.jpg

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Replacing images : WestPack-2020 - WestPack-2020 ON

Demonstrating its continued commitment to increasing packaging sustainability, Colgate-Palmolive Co. is launching its new Smile for Good toothpaste brand in the recyclable high-density polyethylene (HDPE) tube the company introduced last year. The Smile for Good brand is currently rolling out in Europe.

Late last year, the company introduced Tom’s of Maine Antiplaque & Whitening toothpaste in the recyclable tube. The tube reboots toothpaste packaging design by replacing non-recyclable laminate materials with a squeezable material made entirely from HDPE—which is, of course, readily recyclable.

Colgate launches Smile for Good toothpaste in recyclable tube

The package is the first tube to be recognized by The Assn. of Plastic Recyclers in North America and RecyClass in Europe. Colgate is sharing its tube technology with tube makers and competitors to support a shift to recyclable tubes that meet regional recycling standards for toothpaste and other products. The Smile for Good launch marks Colgate’s first use of the recyclable tube in Europe.

The tube’s recyclability attribute is a good fit for the Smile for Good brand, which contains a minimal number of ingredients and lists all ingredients, with their purpose/benefit, on the carton’s front panel. The product and/or packaging have been certified by Ecocert, the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), and the United Kingdom’s Vegan Society.

Tom Heaslip, worldwide director, Category Packaging/Global Design & Packaging, Colgate-Palmolive, answers a few questions from Packaging Digest about Smile for Good and its packaging.

 

When will the Smile for Good toothpaste brand launch?

Heaslip: The Smile for Good launch is currently happening across Europe; it is already available in the United Kingdom, Italy and Poland. This follows the launch of the tube for certain Tom’s of Maine flavors in the United States last fall, which are also continuing to roll out.

 

Please describe the Smile for Good packaging components.

Heaslip: The new tube design, as well as the shoulder, are made with HDPE with ethylene vinyl alcohol (EVOH), and includes a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) flavor insert. The cap is made of polypropylene (PP), and plans are underway for a conversion to a polyethylene (PE) cap. The carton is made with recycled board.

 

Are all the Smile for Good packaging components recyclable?

Heaslip: From a technical standpoint, yes, though at this point it is likely that the PET flavor insert will become yield loss at the reprocessor and we are working to address that. Actual recycling will continue to rely on the available infrastructure and reprocessing capabilities in each geography. We recognize that we have a responsibility to lead and are at the start of a journey. There is much work to be done. We’re engaging to build awareness and support among all recycling stakeholders: the materials recovery facilities that sort recyclables, the reclaimers that produce resin from recycled plastic, the municipalities that operate recycling programs, and others.

 

Does the Smile for Good packaging provide recycling instructions for consumers?

Heaslip: With a launch across different countries of Europe, we needed to keep it simple: “Recyclable Carton” and “Recyclable Tube.”

 

How are the tubes decorated?

Heaslip: The tubes are flexo printed.

____________________________________________________________________________________________

WestPack-2020  WestPack 2020: Ideas. Education. New Partners. Feb. 11-13

____________________________________________________________________________________________

Why did Colgate choose to print the product’s ingredients on the carton’s front panel, especially in a category that competes fiercely on-shelf with dynamic packaging designs, holograms, foil and the like?

Heaslip: We believe that people should have the chance to make an informed decision about the ingredients in the products they choose. Colgate’s Smile for Good Toothpaste sets a new standard for ingredient transparency by listing ingredients on the front panel and explaining each ingredient’s purpose in simple language. Similarly, we’ve started a project to reveal our ingredients on our website.

 

Is the carton kraft, or is it printed that color? Why did you choose this look for the Smile for Good brand?

Heaslip: It is kraft and meant to be in line with the idea of natural, ingredient simplicity and transparency.

Colgate-recyclable-tube

Is Colgate making the tubes in-house? If not, who supplies them?

Heaslip: The Smile for Good tube is supplied by Albéa, using Colgate’s Samson technology as recognized as recyclable by The Assn. of Plastic Recyclers and RecyClass. We’re now installing equipment at our plants to make the new tubes, but we wanted to get started on the transition. We’re committed to making all of our packaging reusable, recyclable or compostable by 2025.

____________________________________________________________________________________________

Fist-bumpFind your success! Subscribe to free Packaging Digest enewsletters.

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Demonstrating its continued commitment to increasing packaging sustainability, Colgate-Palmolive Co. is launching its new Smile for Good toothpaste brand in the recyclable high-density polyethylene (HDPE) tube the company introduced last year. The Smile for Good brand is currently rolling out in Europe.

Late last year, the company introduced Tom’s of Maine Antiplaque & Whitening toothpaste in the recyclable tube. The tube reboots toothpaste packaging design by replacing non-recyclable laminate materials with a squeezable material made entirely from HDPE—which is, of course, readily recyclable.

Colgate launches Smile for Good toothpaste in recyclable tube

The package is the first tube to be recognized by The Assn. of Plastic Recyclers in North America and RecyClass in Europe. Colgate is sharing its tube technology with tube makers and competitors to support a shift to recyclable tubes that meet regional recycling standards for toothpaste and other products. The Smile for Good launch marks Colgate’s first use of the recyclable tube in Europe.

The tube’s recyclability attribute is a good fit for the Smile for Good brand, which contains a minimal number of ingredients and lists all ingredients, with their purpose/benefit, on the carton’s front panel. The product and/or packaging have been certified by Ecocert, the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), and the United Kingdom’s Vegan Society.

Tom Heaslip, worldwide director, Category Packaging/Global Design & Packaging, Colgate-Palmolive, answers a few questions from Packaging Digest about Smile for Good and its packaging.

 

When will the Smile for Good toothpaste brand launch?

Heaslip: The Smile for Good launch is currently happening across Europe; it is already available in the United Kingdom, Italy and Poland. This follows the launch of the tube for certain Tom’s of Maine flavors in the United States last fall, which are also continuing to roll out.

 

Please describe the Smile for Good packaging components.

Heaslip: The new tube design, as well as the shoulder, are made with HDPE with ethylene vinyl alcohol (EVOH), and includes a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) flavor insert. The cap is made of polypropylene (PP), and plans are underway for a conversion to a polyethylene (PE) cap. The carton is made with recycled board.

 

Are all the Smile for Good packaging components recyclable?

Heaslip: From a technical standpoint, yes, though at this point it is likely that the PET flavor insert will become yield loss at the reprocessor and we are working to address that. Actual recycling will continue to rely on the available infrastructure and reprocessing capabilities in each geography. We recognize that we have a responsibility to lead and are at the start of a journey. There is much work to be done. We’re engaging to build awareness and support among all recycling stakeholders: the materials recovery facilities that sort recyclables, the reclaimers that produce resin from recycled plastic, the municipalities that operate recycling programs, and others.

 

Does the Smile for Good packaging provide recycling instructions for consumers?

Heaslip: With a launch across different countries of Europe, we needed to keep it simple: “Recyclable Carton” and “Recyclable Tube.”

 

How are the tubes decorated?

Heaslip: The tubes are flexo printed.

____________________________________________________________________________________________

Colgate launches Smile for Good toothpaste in recyclable tube  WestPack 2020: Ideas. Education. New Partners. Feb. 11-13

____________________________________________________________________________________________

Why did Colgate choose to print the product’s ingredients on the carton’s front panel, especially in a category that competes fiercely on-shelf with dynamic packaging designs, holograms, foil and the like?

Heaslip: We believe that people should have the chance to make an informed decision about the ingredients in the products they choose. Colgate’s Smile for Good Toothpaste sets a new standard for ingredient transparency by listing ingredients on the front panel and explaining each ingredient’s purpose in simple language. Similarly, we’ve started a project to reveal our ingredients on our website.

 

Is the carton kraft, or is it printed that color? Why did you choose this look for the Smile for Good brand?

Heaslip: It is kraft and meant to be in line with the idea of natural, ingredient simplicity and transparency.

Colgate-recyclable-tube

Is Colgate making the tubes in-house? If not, who supplies them?

Heaslip: The Smile for Good tube is supplied by Albéa, using Colgate’s Samson technology as recognized as recyclable by The Assn. of Plastic Recyclers and RecyClass. We’re now installing equipment at our plants to make the new tubes, but we wanted to get started on the transition. We’re committed to making all of our packaging reusable, recyclable or compostable by 2025.

____________________________________________________________________________________________

Fist-bumpFind your success! Subscribe to free Packaging Digest enewsletters.

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Replacing images : Fist-bump - Fist-bump ON

Demonstrating its continued commitment to increasing packaging sustainability, Colgate-Palmolive Co. is launching its new Smile for Good toothpaste brand in the recyclable high-density polyethylene (HDPE) tube the company introduced last year. The Smile for Good brand is currently rolling out in Europe.

Late last year, the company introduced Tom’s of Maine Antiplaque & Whitening toothpaste in the recyclable tube. The tube reboots toothpaste packaging design by replacing non-recyclable laminate materials with a squeezable material made entirely from HDPE—which is, of course, readily recyclable.

Colgate launches Smile for Good toothpaste in recyclable tube

The package is the first tube to be recognized by The Assn. of Plastic Recyclers in North America and RecyClass in Europe. Colgate is sharing its tube technology with tube makers and competitors to support a shift to recyclable tubes that meet regional recycling standards for toothpaste and other products. The Smile for Good launch marks Colgate’s first use of the recyclable tube in Europe.

The tube’s recyclability attribute is a good fit for the Smile for Good brand, which contains a minimal number of ingredients and lists all ingredients, with their purpose/benefit, on the carton’s front panel. The product and/or packaging have been certified by Ecocert, the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), and the United Kingdom’s Vegan Society.

Tom Heaslip, worldwide director, Category Packaging/Global Design & Packaging, Colgate-Palmolive, answers a few questions from Packaging Digest about Smile for Good and its packaging.

 

When will the Smile for Good toothpaste brand launch?

Heaslip: The Smile for Good launch is currently happening across Europe; it is already available in the United Kingdom, Italy and Poland. This follows the launch of the tube for certain Tom’s of Maine flavors in the United States last fall, which are also continuing to roll out.

 

Please describe the Smile for Good packaging components.

Heaslip: The new tube design, as well as the shoulder, are made with HDPE with ethylene vinyl alcohol (EVOH), and includes a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) flavor insert. The cap is made of polypropylene (PP), and plans are underway for a conversion to a polyethylene (PE) cap. The carton is made with recycled board.

 

Are all the Smile for Good packaging components recyclable?

Heaslip: From a technical standpoint, yes, though at this point it is likely that the PET flavor insert will become yield loss at the reprocessor and we are working to address that. Actual recycling will continue to rely on the available infrastructure and reprocessing capabilities in each geography. We recognize that we have a responsibility to lead and are at the start of a journey. There is much work to be done. We’re engaging to build awareness and support among all recycling stakeholders: the materials recovery facilities that sort recyclables, the reclaimers that produce resin from recycled plastic, the municipalities that operate recycling programs, and others.

 

Does the Smile for Good packaging provide recycling instructions for consumers?

Heaslip: With a launch across different countries of Europe, we needed to keep it simple: “Recyclable Carton” and “Recyclable Tube.”

 

How are the tubes decorated?

Heaslip: The tubes are flexo printed.

____________________________________________________________________________________________

Colgate launches Smile for Good toothpaste in recyclable tube  WestPack 2020: Ideas. Education. New Partners. Feb. 11-13

____________________________________________________________________________________________

Why did Colgate choose to print the product’s ingredients on the carton’s front panel, especially in a category that competes fiercely on-shelf with dynamic packaging designs, holograms, foil and the like?

Heaslip: We believe that people should have the chance to make an informed decision about the ingredients in the products they choose. Colgate’s Smile for Good Toothpaste sets a new standard for ingredient transparency by listing ingredients on the front panel and explaining each ingredient’s purpose in simple language. Similarly, we’ve started a project to reveal our ingredients on our website.

 

Is the carton kraft, or is it printed that color? Why did you choose this look for the Smile for Good brand?

Heaslip: It is kraft and meant to be in line with the idea of natural, ingredient simplicity and transparency.

Colgate launches Smile for Good toothpaste in recyclable tube

Is Colgate making the tubes in-house? If not, who supplies them?

Heaslip: The Smile for Good tube is supplied by Albéa, using Colgate’s Samson technology as recognized as recyclable by The Assn. of Plastic Recyclers and RecyClass. We’re now installing equipment at our plants to make the new tubes, but we wanted to get started on the transition. We’re committed to making all of our packaging reusable, recyclable or compostable by 2025.

____________________________________________________________________________________________

Fist-bumpFind your success! Subscribe to free Packaging Digest enewsletters.

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Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :Colgate launches Smile for Good toothpaste in recyclable tube

Array ( [post_title] => Colgate launches Smile for Good toothpaste in recyclable tube [post_content] =>

Demonstrating its continued commitment to increasing packaging sustainability, Colgate-Palmolive Co. is launching its new Smile for Good toothpaste brand in the recyclable high-density polyethylene (HDPE) tube the company introduced last year. The Smile for Good brand is currently rolling out in Europe.

Late last year, the company introduced Tom’s of Maine Antiplaque & Whitening toothpaste in the recyclable tube. The tube reboots toothpaste packaging design by replacing non-recyclable laminate materials with a squeezable material made entirely from HDPE—which is, of course, readily recyclable.

Colgate launches Smile for Good toothpaste in recyclable tube

The package is the first tube to be recognized by The Assn. of Plastic Recyclers in North America and RecyClass in Europe. Colgate is sharing its tube technology with tube makers and competitors to support a shift to recyclable tubes that meet regional recycling standards for toothpaste and other products. The Smile for Good launch marks Colgate’s first use of the recyclable tube in Europe.

The tube’s recyclability attribute is a good fit for the Smile for Good brand, which contains a minimal number of ingredients and lists all ingredients, with their purpose/benefit, on the carton’s front panel. The product and/or packaging have been certified by Ecocert, the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), and the United Kingdom’s Vegan Society.

Tom Heaslip, worldwide director, Category Packaging/Global Design & Packaging, Colgate-Palmolive, answers a few questions from Packaging Digest about Smile for Good and its packaging.

 

When will the Smile for Good toothpaste brand launch?

Heaslip: The Smile for Good launch is currently happening across Europe; it is already available in the United Kingdom, Italy and Poland. This follows the launch of the tube for certain Tom’s of Maine flavors in the United States last fall, which are also continuing to roll out.

 

Please describe the Smile for Good packaging components.

Heaslip: The new tube design, as well as the shoulder, are made with HDPE with ethylene vinyl alcohol (EVOH), and includes a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) flavor insert. The cap is made of polypropylene (PP), and plans are underway for a conversion to a polyethylene (PE) cap. The carton is made with recycled board.

 

Are all the Smile for Good packaging components recyclable?

Heaslip: From a technical standpoint, yes, though at this point it is likely that the PET flavor insert will become yield loss at the reprocessor and we are working to address that. Actual recycling will continue to rely on the available infrastructure and reprocessing capabilities in each geography. We recognize that we have a responsibility to lead and are at the start of a journey. There is much work to be done. We’re engaging to build awareness and support among all recycling stakeholders: the materials recovery facilities that sort recyclables, the reclaimers that produce resin from recycled plastic, the municipalities that operate recycling programs, and others.

 

Does the Smile for Good packaging provide recycling instructions for consumers?

Heaslip: With a launch across different countries of Europe, we needed to keep it simple: “Recyclable Carton” and “Recyclable Tube.”

 

How are the tubes decorated?

Heaslip: The tubes are flexo printed.

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Colgate launches Smile for Good toothpaste in recyclable tube  WestPack 2020: Ideas. Education. New Partners. Feb. 11-13

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Why did Colgate choose to print the product’s ingredients on the carton’s front panel, especially in a category that competes fiercely on-shelf with dynamic packaging designs, holograms, foil and the like?

Heaslip: We believe that people should have the chance to make an informed decision about the ingredients in the products they choose. Colgate’s Smile for Good Toothpaste sets a new standard for ingredient transparency by listing ingredients on the front panel and explaining each ingredient’s purpose in simple language. Similarly, we’ve started a project to reveal our ingredients on our website.

 

Is the carton kraft, or is it printed that color? Why did you choose this look for the Smile for Good brand?

Heaslip: It is kraft and meant to be in line with the idea of natural, ingredient simplicity and transparency.

Colgate launches Smile for Good toothpaste in recyclable tube

Is Colgate making the tubes in-house? If not, who supplies them?

Heaslip: The Smile for Good tube is supplied by Albéa, using Colgate’s Samson technology as recognized as recyclable by The Assn. of Plastic Recyclers and RecyClass. We’re now installing equipment at our plants to make the new tubes, but we wanted to get started on the transition. We’re committed to making all of our packaging reusable, recyclable or compostable by 2025.

____________________________________________________________________________________________

Colgate launches Smile for Good toothpaste in recyclable tubeFind your success! Subscribe to free Packaging Digest enewsletters.

[post_excerpt] => Demonstrating its continued commitment to increasing packaging sustainability, Colgate-Palmolive Co. is launching its new Smile for Good toothpaste brand in the recyclable high-density polyethylene (HDPE) tube the company introduced last year. The Smil... [post_date_gmt] => 2020-02-05 22:50:32 [post_date] => 2020-02-05 22:50:32 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-02-05 22:50:32 [post_modified] => 2020-02-05 22:50:32 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => 29339 at https://www.packagingdigest.com [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => image/jpeg ) [syndication_source] => Packaging Digest [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.packagingdigest.com [syndication_source_id] => http://www.packagingdigest.com/rss.xml [syndication_feed] => http://www.packagingdigest.com/rss.xml [syndication_feed_id] => 109 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.packagingdigest.com/sustainable-packaging/colgate-launches-smile-for-good-toothpaste-in-recyclable-tube-2020-02-05 [syndication_item_hash] => 52efc740044d77b449dce19c69783880 [faf_featured_image] => 0 [faf_process_image] => 0,0,0,0,0 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 8266 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

FAF deciding on filters on post to be syndicated:

Next-gen print-and-apply system meets Industry 4.0 protocols

Array ( [post_title] => Next-gen print-and-apply system meets Industry 4.0 protocols [post_content] =>

The XPA 934 meets digital requirements via a multitude of interfaces and real-time data available instantly to support print and apply processes in Industry 4.0 environments.

 

Fully loaded and enabled for leading-edge capabilities, the XPA 934 print-and-apply system is engineered for ease of installation and use by any level of customer.

Some key features:

The system also meets digital requirements with a a multitude of interfaces and real-time data that can be called up at any time support print & apply processes in Industry 4.0. These include multi-stage, configurable I/O points with M12 connectors for readily adaptable system interfaces. A cross-media provision of information ensures connection via LAN interface, access to operating instructions via convenient QR code and cable-free 1:1 connection via USB stick.

Capability for remote operation via an optional 7-inch Panel PC that permits real-time data retrieval and error messages.

While Novexx only entered the market in 2015 and may be a new name for U.S. customers, the company offers 50 years’ experience in the industrial identification and labeling business. How? It originated from Avery Dennison’s Industrial Print & Apply (IPA) line of business and now leverages its global know-how with the drive of a midsize enterprise to help customers advance their supply-chain capabilities.

See the new XPA 934 in person during WestPack 2020 (Feb. 11-13; Anaheim, CA) in Novexx Booth 5378.

[post_excerpt] => The XPA 934 meets digital requirements via a multitude of interfaces and real-time data available instantly to support print and apply processes in Industry 4.0 environments. Fully loaded and enabled for leading-edge capabilities, the XPA 934 print-and... [post_date_gmt] => 2020-02-05 16:07:26 [post_date] => 2020-02-05 16:07:26 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-02-05 16:07:26 [post_modified] => 2020-02-05 16:07:26 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => 29337 at https://www.packagingdigest.com [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Packaging Digest [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.packagingdigest.com [syndication_source_id] => http://www.packagingdigest.com/rss.xml [syndication_feed] => http://www.packagingdigest.com/rss.xml [syndication_feed_id] => 109 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.packagingdigest.com/print-and-apply-labelers/next-gen-print-apply-meets-industry40-2020-02-05 [syndication_item_hash] => 324095adbccbf194c130da8743642d4c ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 8266 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

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Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :Next-gen print-and-apply system meets Industry 4.0 protocols

Array ( [post_title] => Next-gen print-and-apply system meets Industry 4.0 protocols [post_content] =>

The XPA 934 meets digital requirements via a multitude of interfaces and real-time data available instantly to support print and apply processes in Industry 4.0 environments.

 

Fully loaded and enabled for leading-edge capabilities, the XPA 934 print-and-apply system is engineered for ease of installation and use by any level of customer.

Some key features:

The system also meets digital requirements with a a multitude of interfaces and real-time data that can be called up at any time support print & apply processes in Industry 4.0. These include multi-stage, configurable I/O points with M12 connectors for readily adaptable system interfaces. A cross-media provision of information ensures connection via LAN interface, access to operating instructions via convenient QR code and cable-free 1:1 connection via USB stick.

Capability for remote operation via an optional 7-inch Panel PC that permits real-time data retrieval and error messages.

While Novexx only entered the market in 2015 and may be a new name for U.S. customers, the company offers 50 years’ experience in the industrial identification and labeling business. How? It originated from Avery Dennison’s Industrial Print & Apply (IPA) line of business and now leverages its global know-how with the drive of a midsize enterprise to help customers advance their supply-chain capabilities.

See the new XPA 934 in person during WestPack 2020 (Feb. 11-13; Anaheim, CA) in Novexx Booth 5378.

[post_excerpt] => The XPA 934 meets digital requirements via a multitude of interfaces and real-time data available instantly to support print and apply processes in Industry 4.0 environments. Fully loaded and enabled for leading-edge capabilities, the XPA 934 print-and... [post_date_gmt] => 2020-02-05 16:07:26 [post_date] => 2020-02-05 16:07:26 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-02-05 16:07:26 [post_modified] => 2020-02-05 16:07:26 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => 29337 at https://www.packagingdigest.com [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Packaging Digest [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.packagingdigest.com [syndication_source_id] => http://www.packagingdigest.com/rss.xml [syndication_feed] => http://www.packagingdigest.com/rss.xml [syndication_feed_id] => 109 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.packagingdigest.com/print-and-apply-labelers/next-gen-print-apply-meets-industry40-2020-02-05 [syndication_item_hash] => 324095adbccbf194c130da8743642d4c [faf_process_image] => ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 8266 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

FAF deciding on filters on post to be syndicated:

New stretch-wrapper carriage saves film

Array ( [post_title] => New stretch-wrapper carriage saves film [post_content] =>

Orion’s S-Carriage delivers 260% pre-stretch and is adjustable for higher or lower pre-stretch as load requirements vary, saving an estimated $1,200 in film costs yearly.

 

Orion, a product brand of ProMach, introduces the brand’s new S-Carriage pre-stretch system for lowest stretch-film consumption required to contain the load. The S-Carriage becomes Orion’s new standard carriage and will roll out across all models by the end of 2020.

Orion estimates that replacing film carriages offering 234% pre-stretch with the S series’ assured 260% pre-stretch will increase the number of loads per roll from 135 to 154. In this scenario the film cost reduction over three years will be an estimated $3,600. Consistent pre-stretch of 260% and above reduces film acquisition costs for shippers and improves end-user sustainability through less waste. The S design also allows Orion’s customers to take advantage of evolving film technologies, which are now capable of reaching up to 600% pre-stretch.

Orion's S-Carriage delivers 180 degrees of film to roller contact, which reduces slippage and neckdown for improved film coverage and yield. The S pattern of film travel over carriage rollers is ideal for all types of cling films, even one-sided films, as the sticky side remains against the load for improved holding power. Automated Orion Insta-Thread and Insta-Cut features reduce film handling for labor savings, improve throughput and lower risk of worker injury.

See the new S-Carriage in person during WestPack 2020 (Feb. 11-13; Anaheim, CA) at Orion Booth 5221.

[post_excerpt] => Orion’s S-Carriage delivers 260% pre-stretch and is adjustable for higher or lower pre-stretch as load requirements vary, saving an estimated $1,200 in film costs yearly. Orion, a product brand of ProMach, introduces the brand’s new S-Carriage pre-stre... [post_date_gmt] => 2020-02-04 22:45:14 [post_date] => 2020-02-04 22:45:14 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-02-04 22:45:14 [post_modified] => 2020-02-04 22:45:14 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => 29335 at https://www.packagingdigest.com [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Packaging Digest [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.packagingdigest.com [syndication_source_id] => http://www.packagingdigest.com/rss.xml [syndication_feed] => http://www.packagingdigest.com/rss.xml [syndication_feed_id] => 109 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.packagingdigest.com/wrappers/film-saving-stretch-wrapper-carriage-2020-02-04 [syndication_item_hash] => e8f61b592a8d270e259f7f99da45c5b6 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 8266 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

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Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Packaging Digest [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.packagingdigest.com [syndication_source_id] => http://www.packagingdigest.com/rss.xml [syndication_feed] => http://www.packagingdigest.com/rss.xml [syndication_feed_id] => 109 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.packagingdigest.com/wrappers/film-saving-stretch-wrapper-carriage-2020-02-04 [syndication_item_hash] => e8f61b592a8d270e259f7f99da45c5b6 )

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Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :New stretch-wrapper carriage saves film

Array ( [post_title] => New stretch-wrapper carriage saves film [post_content] =>

Orion’s S-Carriage delivers 260% pre-stretch and is adjustable for higher or lower pre-stretch as load requirements vary, saving an estimated $1,200 in film costs yearly.

 

Orion, a product brand of ProMach, introduces the brand’s new S-Carriage pre-stretch system for lowest stretch-film consumption required to contain the load. The S-Carriage becomes Orion’s new standard carriage and will roll out across all models by the end of 2020.

Orion estimates that replacing film carriages offering 234% pre-stretch with the S series’ assured 260% pre-stretch will increase the number of loads per roll from 135 to 154. In this scenario the film cost reduction over three years will be an estimated $3,600. Consistent pre-stretch of 260% and above reduces film acquisition costs for shippers and improves end-user sustainability through less waste. The S design also allows Orion’s customers to take advantage of evolving film technologies, which are now capable of reaching up to 600% pre-stretch.

Orion's S-Carriage delivers 180 degrees of film to roller contact, which reduces slippage and neckdown for improved film coverage and yield. The S pattern of film travel over carriage rollers is ideal for all types of cling films, even one-sided films, as the sticky side remains against the load for improved holding power. Automated Orion Insta-Thread and Insta-Cut features reduce film handling for labor savings, improve throughput and lower risk of worker injury.

See the new S-Carriage in person during WestPack 2020 (Feb. 11-13; Anaheim, CA) at Orion Booth 5221.

[post_excerpt] => Orion’s S-Carriage delivers 260% pre-stretch and is adjustable for higher or lower pre-stretch as load requirements vary, saving an estimated $1,200 in film costs yearly. Orion, a product brand of ProMach, introduces the brand’s new S-Carriage pre-stre... [post_date_gmt] => 2020-02-04 22:45:14 [post_date] => 2020-02-04 22:45:14 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-02-04 22:45:14 [post_modified] => 2020-02-04 22:45:14 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => 29335 at https://www.packagingdigest.com [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Packaging Digest [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.packagingdigest.com [syndication_source_id] => http://www.packagingdigest.com/rss.xml [syndication_feed] => http://www.packagingdigest.com/rss.xml [syndication_feed_id] => 109 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.packagingdigest.com/wrappers/film-saving-stretch-wrapper-carriage-2020-02-04 [syndication_item_hash] => e8f61b592a8d270e259f7f99da45c5b6 [faf_process_image] => ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 8266 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )


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[WordPress]抜粋表示にしてみた

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[post_excerpt] => “index.php” に書かれている get_template_part( 'template-parts/post/content',get_post_format()); と記述されていたの … "[WordPress]抜粋表示にしてみた" の続きを読む [post_date_gmt] => 2019-11-01 04:46:18 [post_date] => 2019-11-01 04:46:18 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-11-01 04:46:18 [post_modified] => 2019-11-01 04:46:18 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => https://prinblog.com/?p=100 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => プリンのブログ [syndication_source_uri] => https://prinblog.com [syndication_source_id] => http://www.prinblog.com/feed/ [syndication_feed] => http://www.prinblog.com/feed/ [syndication_feed_id] => 104 [syndication_permalink] => https://prinblog.com/2019/11/01/13/46/18/100/memorandum/prin/wordpress%E6%8A%9C%E7%B2%8B%E8%A1%A8%E7%A4%BA%E3%81%AB%E3%81%97%E3%81%A6%E3%81%BF%E3%81%9F/ [syndication_item_hash] => 0722d3d12741892e4f962e793f15739d ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 1089 [1] => 899 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

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Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :[WordPress]抜粋表示にしてみた

Array ( [post_title] => [WordPress]抜粋表示にしてみた [post_content] => “index.php” に書かれている get_template_part( 'template-parts/post/content',get_post_format()); と記述されていたの …

[post_excerpt] => “index.php” に書かれている get_template_part( 'template-parts/post/content',get_post_format()); と記述されていたの … "[WordPress]抜粋表示にしてみた" の続きを読む [post_date_gmt] => 2019-11-01 04:46:18 [post_date] => 2019-11-01 04:46:18 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-11-01 04:46:18 [post_modified] => 2019-11-01 04:46:18 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => https://prinblog.com/?p=100 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => プリンのブログ [syndication_source_uri] => https://prinblog.com [syndication_source_id] => http://www.prinblog.com/feed/ [syndication_feed] => http://www.prinblog.com/feed/ [syndication_feed_id] => 104 [syndication_permalink] => https://prinblog.com/2019/11/01/13/46/18/100/memorandum/prin/wordpress%E6%8A%9C%E7%B2%8B%E8%A1%A8%E7%A4%BA%E3%81%AB%E3%81%97%E3%81%A6%E3%81%BF%E3%81%9F/ [syndication_item_hash] => 0722d3d12741892e4f962e793f15739d [faf_process_image] => ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 1089 [1] => 899 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

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新しい AirPods Pro が発表されたよ!

Array ( [post_title] => 新しい AirPods Pro が発表されたよ! [post_content] => しれーっとAirPodsProが発表されましたね。 発売日は、10月30日らしいですが 見た目としては、はみ出ているうどんの部分が短くなった気がしますね。 そして今回私が今回一番気になっている機能は、何と言っても、「アク …

[post_excerpt] => しれーっとAirPodsProが発表されましたね。 発売日は、10月30日らしいですが 見た目としては、はみ出ているうどんの部分が短くなった気がしますね。 そして今回私が今回一番気になっている機能は、何と言っても、「アク … "新しい AirPods Pro が発表されたよ!" の続きを読む... [post_date_gmt] => 2019-10-29 13:18:41 [post_date] => 2019-10-29 13:18:41 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-10-29 13:18:41 [post_modified] => 2019-10-29 13:18:41 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => https://prinblog.com/?p=78 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => プリンのブログ [syndication_source_uri] => https://prinblog.com [syndication_source_id] => http://www.prinblog.com/feed/ [syndication_feed] => http://www.prinblog.com/feed/ [syndication_feed_id] => 104 [syndication_permalink] => https://prinblog.com/2019/10/29/22/18/41/78/other/prin/%E6%96%B0%E3%81%97%E3%81%84-airpods-pro-%E3%81%8C%E7%99%BA%E8%A1%A8%E3%81%95%E3%82%8C%E3%81%9F%E3%82%88%EF%BC%81/ [syndication_item_hash] => 3ba3f4546b922137040026bcf5b52fa9 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( [0] => 533 ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 10469 [1] => 1089 [2] => 899 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

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Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :新しい AirPods Pro が発表されたよ!

Array ( [post_title] => 新しい AirPods Pro が発表されたよ! [post_content] => しれーっとAirPodsProが発表されましたね。 発売日は、10月30日らしいですが 見た目としては、はみ出ているうどんの部分が短くなった気がしますね。 そして今回私が今回一番気になっている機能は、何と言っても、「アク …

[post_excerpt] => しれーっとAirPodsProが発表されましたね。 発売日は、10月30日らしいですが 見た目としては、はみ出ているうどんの部分が短くなった気がしますね。 そして今回私が今回一番気になっている機能は、何と言っても、「アク … "新しい AirPods Pro が発表されたよ!" の続きを読む... [post_date_gmt] => 2019-10-29 13:18:41 [post_date] => 2019-10-29 13:18:41 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-10-29 13:18:41 [post_modified] => 2019-10-29 13:18:41 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => https://prinblog.com/?p=78 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => プリンのブログ [syndication_source_uri] => https://prinblog.com [syndication_source_id] => http://www.prinblog.com/feed/ [syndication_feed] => http://www.prinblog.com/feed/ [syndication_feed_id] => 104 [syndication_permalink] => https://prinblog.com/2019/10/29/22/18/41/78/other/prin/%E6%96%B0%E3%81%97%E3%81%84-airpods-pro-%E3%81%8C%E7%99%BA%E8%A1%A8%E3%81%95%E3%82%8C%E3%81%9F%E3%82%88%EF%BC%81/ [syndication_item_hash] => 3ba3f4546b922137040026bcf5b52fa9 [faf_process_image] => ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( [0] => 533 ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 10469 [1] => 1089 [2] => 899 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )


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FAF deciding on filters on post to be syndicated:

Manage Your New Nutrition Labels

Array ( [post_title] => Manage Your New Nutrition Labels [post_content] =>

The new style, FDA approved, nutritional facts labels take effect next month.

The agency has stated that due to many companies int the food industry not being ready, enforcement will be delayed for six months, but this is still a good time to ensure you have a plan to be in compliance.

One of the reasons stated for the delay is that many food producers have a large number of existing printed labels in stock that need to be used up, and many have not finished the process of procuring labels to the new design.

One way to help with this problem (and to make managing many SKUs of nutrition labels much easier) is to invest in ID Technology’s labeling system, with optional print/apply head to print the nutrition information right on the label applicator at the time of use.

The 262 print/apply labeling head can be used as the bottom head on a top/bottom labeler or as a bottom only labeler in order to produce the completed printed nutrition label.

On a top/bottom set-up, this allows for the existing nicely printed digital or flexo label to be applied to the top of the package and the complete bottom label with allergen, ingredients and nutritional information be printed on the bottom label.

We recommend using NiceLabel label management to provide full control of the label designs and ensure that only the correct, approved label is printed every time.

Using this system can eliminate the need to source and manage multiple pre-printed label SKUs and prevent being left with inventories of obsolete labels when the copy on the label changes.

In addition, the 262 labeling head can also apply conventional printed labels, allowing our customers to use pre-printed labels for large volume products and the print/apply feature for smaller runs.

Our labeling systems are built in the USA and are designed to be easy to set-up, use and maintain.

How can ID Technology help you meet your objectives for your labeling operations? Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3. You can also email me at dholliday@idtechnology.com. We’ll be sure to get you in touch with an expert, right in your area!

[post_excerpt] => The new style, FDA approved, nutritional facts labels take effect next month. The agency has stated that due to many companies int the food industry not being ready, enforcement will be delayed for six months, but this is still a good time to ensure you have a plan to be in compliance. One of the […] [post_date_gmt] => 2019-12-11 22:40:15 [post_date] => 2019-12-11 22:40:15 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-11 22:40:15 [post_modified] => 2019-12-11 22:40:15 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => http://www.labelingnews.com/?p=5974 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Labeling News [syndication_source_uri] => http://www.labelingnews.com [syndication_source_id] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed_id] => 12 [syndication_permalink] => http://www.labelingnews.com/2019/12/manage-your-new-nutrition-labels/ [syndication_item_hash] => 703d705730d88ef43b42eccf58528973 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 1625 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

Doing filter:faf_image_filter

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Image process

Local save:http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/digitalize-labeling-262b.jpg

Image process :: Saving local image

grab remote location : http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/digitalize-labeling-262b.jpg

Image exists, checking for same file size

Replacing images : - ON

The new style, FDA approved, nutritional facts labels take effect next month.

The agency has stated that due to many companies int the food industry not being ready, enforcement will be delayed for six months, but this is still a good time to ensure you have a plan to be in compliance.

One of the reasons stated for the delay is that many food producers have a large number of existing printed labels in stock that need to be used up, and many have not finished the process of procuring labels to the new design.

One way to help with this problem (and to make managing many SKUs of nutrition labels much easier) is to invest in ID Technology’s labeling system, with optional print/apply head to print the nutrition information right on the label applicator at the time of use.

The 262 print/apply labeling head can be used as the bottom head on a top/bottom labeler or as a bottom only labeler in order to produce the completed printed nutrition label.

On a top/bottom set-up, this allows for the existing nicely printed digital or flexo label to be applied to the top of the package and the complete bottom label with allergen, ingredients and nutritional information be printed on the bottom label.

We recommend using NiceLabel label management to provide full control of the label designs and ensure that only the correct, approved label is printed every time.

Using this system can eliminate the need to source and manage multiple pre-printed label SKUs and prevent being left with inventories of obsolete labels when the copy on the label changes.

In addition, the 262 labeling head can also apply conventional printed labels, allowing our customers to use pre-printed labels for large volume products and the print/apply feature for smaller runs.

Our labeling systems are built in the USA and are designed to be easy to set-up, use and maintain.

How can ID Technology help you meet your objectives for your labeling operations? Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3. You can also email me at dholliday@idtechnology.com. We’ll be sure to get you in touch with an expert, right in your area!

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Execute : Enclosure images

Enclosure save:

Array ( [0] => )

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Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :Manage Your New Nutrition Labels

Array ( [post_title] => Manage Your New Nutrition Labels [post_content] =>

The new style, FDA approved, nutritional facts labels take effect next month.

The agency has stated that due to many companies int the food industry not being ready, enforcement will be delayed for six months, but this is still a good time to ensure you have a plan to be in compliance.

One of the reasons stated for the delay is that many food producers have a large number of existing printed labels in stock that need to be used up, and many have not finished the process of procuring labels to the new design.

One way to help with this problem (and to make managing many SKUs of nutrition labels much easier) is to invest in ID Technology’s labeling system, with optional print/apply head to print the nutrition information right on the label applicator at the time of use.

Manage Your New Nutrition Labels

The 262 print/apply labeling head can be used as the bottom head on a top/bottom labeler or as a bottom only labeler in order to produce the completed printed nutrition label.

On a top/bottom set-up, this allows for the existing nicely printed digital or flexo label to be applied to the top of the package and the complete bottom label with allergen, ingredients and nutritional information be printed on the bottom label.

We recommend using NiceLabel label management to provide full control of the label designs and ensure that only the correct, approved label is printed every time.

Using this system can eliminate the need to source and manage multiple pre-printed label SKUs and prevent being left with inventories of obsolete labels when the copy on the label changes.

In addition, the 262 labeling head can also apply conventional printed labels, allowing our customers to use pre-printed labels for large volume products and the print/apply feature for smaller runs.

Our labeling systems are built in the USA and are designed to be easy to set-up, use and maintain.

How can ID Technology help you meet your objectives for your labeling operations? Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3. You can also email me at dholliday@idtechnology.com. We’ll be sure to get you in touch with an expert, right in your area!

[post_excerpt] => The new style, FDA approved, nutritional facts labels take effect next month. The agency has stated that due to many companies int the food industry not being ready, enforcement will be delayed for six months, but this is still a good time to ensure you have a plan to be in compliance. One of the […] [post_date_gmt] => 2019-12-11 22:40:15 [post_date] => 2019-12-11 22:40:15 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-12-11 22:40:15 [post_modified] => 2019-12-11 22:40:15 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => http://www.labelingnews.com/?p=5974 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Labeling News [syndication_source_uri] => http://www.labelingnews.com [syndication_source_id] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed_id] => 12 [syndication_permalink] => http://www.labelingnews.com/2019/12/manage-your-new-nutrition-labels/ [syndication_item_hash] => 703d705730d88ef43b42eccf58528973 [faf_featured_image] => 0 [faf_process_image] => 0 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 1625 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

FAF deciding on filters on post to be syndicated:

Canadian Printing Awards – Congratulations Jet Label!

Array ( [post_title] => Canadian Printing Awards – Congratulations Jet Label! [post_content] =>

The Canadian Printing Awards is an annual event, currently in its 14th year, that celebrates the excellence and innovation of the printing industry in Canada.

The awards cover a wide range of print and printing-related categories, Industry Achievement, Print Design, Printing, Technology and Environmental.

The 2019 awards were presented at a gala event in Toronto and a total of 113 gold, silver and bronze awards were presented.

We are thrilled that the newest member of our ProMach Labeling & Coding family, Jet Label swept the awards in the Digital Label category, winning gold, silver and bronze.

 

This is a fantastic achievement and all three Jet Label submissions would have been worthy of first place. Here is the gold award and the winning label, printed for Dog Island Brewing:

To show just how consistent the Jet Label quality is, this isn’t the first time our colleagues have dominated the Digital Label category at the awards. Here are the gold, silver and bronze winners from 2018 – see a trend here?

Jet Label is Western Canada’s largest supplier of high-quality labels (both digital and flexo) with large investments in equipment and a super team of motivated professionals. A great addition to the ProMach family.

With 7 label converting and printing plants across the United States and Canada, ProMach is your local label company with national reach and support. Combining our labels with ID Technology and EPI labeling equipment is the best way to ensure your products project the right image.

Want to get started improving your labels and labeling? Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3. You can also email me at david.holliday@promachbuilt.com. We’ll be sure to get you in touch with an expert, right in your area!

[post_excerpt] => The Canadian Printing Awards is an annual event, currently in its 14th year, that celebrates the excellence and innovation of the printing industry in Canada. The awards cover a wide range of print and printing-related categories, Industry Achievement, Print Design, Printing, Technology and Environmental. The 2019 awards were presented at a gala event in Toronto […] [post_date_gmt] => 2019-11-08 22:12:39 [post_date] => 2019-11-08 22:12:39 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-11-08 22:12:39 [post_modified] => 2019-11-08 22:12:39 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => http://www.labelingnews.com/?p=5966 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Labeling News [syndication_source_uri] => http://www.labelingnews.com [syndication_source_id] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed_id] => 12 [syndication_permalink] => http://www.labelingnews.com/2019/11/canadian-printing-awards-congratulations-jet-label/ [syndication_item_hash] => 688fde332c4ebb0e26d74b655a18f93e ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 1625 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

Doing filter:faf_image_filter

Execute image filter

Image process

Local save:http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/2019printawards.jpg

Image process :: Saving local image

grab remote location : http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/2019printawards.jpg

Image exists, checking for same file size

Replacing images : - ON

The Canadian Printing Awards is an annual event, currently in its 14th year, that celebrates the excellence and innovation of the printing industry in Canada.

The awards cover a wide range of print and printing-related categories, Industry Achievement, Print Design, Printing, Technology and Environmental.

The 2019 awards were presented at a gala event in Toronto and a total of 113 gold, silver and bronze awards were presented.

We are thrilled that the newest member of our ProMach Labeling & Coding family, Jet Label swept the awards in the Digital Label category, winning gold, silver and bronze.

 

This is a fantastic achievement and all three Jet Label submissions would have been worthy of first place. Here is the gold award and the winning label, printed for Dog Island Brewing:

To show just how consistent the Jet Label quality is, this isn’t the first time our colleagues have dominated the Digital Label category at the awards. Here are the gold, silver and bronze winners from 2018 – see a trend here?

Jet Label is Western Canada’s largest supplier of high-quality labels (both digital and flexo) with large investments in equipment and a super team of motivated professionals. A great addition to the ProMach family.

With 7 label converting and printing plants across the United States and Canada, ProMach is your local label company with national reach and support. Combining our labels with ID Technology and EPI labeling equipment is the best way to ensure your products project the right image.

Want to get started improving your labels and labeling? Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3. You can also email me at david.holliday@promachbuilt.com. We’ll be sure to get you in touch with an expert, right in your area!

Local save:http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/canadaawardgold.jpg

Image process :: Saving local image

grab remote location : http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/canadaawardgold.jpg

Image exists, checking for same file size

Replacing images : - ON

The Canadian Printing Awards is an annual event, currently in its 14th year, that celebrates the excellence and innovation of the printing industry in Canada.

The awards cover a wide range of print and printing-related categories, Industry Achievement, Print Design, Printing, Technology and Environmental.

The 2019 awards were presented at a gala event in Toronto and a total of 113 gold, silver and bronze awards were presented.

We are thrilled that the newest member of our ProMach Labeling & Coding family, Jet Label swept the awards in the Digital Label category, winning gold, silver and bronze.

Canadian Printing Awards – Congratulations Jet Label!

 

This is a fantastic achievement and all three Jet Label submissions would have been worthy of first place. Here is the gold award and the winning label, printed for Dog Island Brewing:

To show just how consistent the Jet Label quality is, this isn’t the first time our colleagues have dominated the Digital Label category at the awards. Here are the gold, silver and bronze winners from 2018 – see a trend here?

Jet Label is Western Canada’s largest supplier of high-quality labels (both digital and flexo) with large investments in equipment and a super team of motivated professionals. A great addition to the ProMach family.

With 7 label converting and printing plants across the United States and Canada, ProMach is your local label company with national reach and support. Combining our labels with ID Technology and EPI labeling equipment is the best way to ensure your products project the right image.

Want to get started improving your labels and labeling? Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3. You can also email me at david.holliday@promachbuilt.com. We’ll be sure to get you in touch with an expert, right in your area!

Local save:http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/2018canadaawards.jpg

Image process :: Saving local image

grab remote location : http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/2018canadaawards.jpg

Image exists, checking for same file size

Replacing images : - ON

The Canadian Printing Awards is an annual event, currently in its 14th year, that celebrates the excellence and innovation of the printing industry in Canada.

The awards cover a wide range of print and printing-related categories, Industry Achievement, Print Design, Printing, Technology and Environmental.

The 2019 awards were presented at a gala event in Toronto and a total of 113 gold, silver and bronze awards were presented.

We are thrilled that the newest member of our ProMach Labeling & Coding family, Jet Label swept the awards in the Digital Label category, winning gold, silver and bronze.

Canadian Printing Awards – Congratulations Jet Label!

 

This is a fantastic achievement and all three Jet Label submissions would have been worthy of first place. Here is the gold award and the winning label, printed for Dog Island Brewing:

Canadian Printing Awards – Congratulations Jet Label!

To show just how consistent the Jet Label quality is, this isn’t the first time our colleagues have dominated the Digital Label category at the awards. Here are the gold, silver and bronze winners from 2018 – see a trend here?

Jet Label is Western Canada’s largest supplier of high-quality labels (both digital and flexo) with large investments in equipment and a super team of motivated professionals. A great addition to the ProMach family.

With 7 label converting and printing plants across the United States and Canada, ProMach is your local label company with national reach and support. Combining our labels with ID Technology and EPI labeling equipment is the best way to ensure your products project the right image.

Want to get started improving your labels and labeling? Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3. You can also email me at david.holliday@promachbuilt.com. We’ll be sure to get you in touch with an expert, right in your area!

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Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :Canadian Printing Awards – Congratulations Jet Label!

Array ( [post_title] => Canadian Printing Awards – Congratulations Jet Label! [post_content] =>

The Canadian Printing Awards is an annual event, currently in its 14th year, that celebrates the excellence and innovation of the printing industry in Canada.

The awards cover a wide range of print and printing-related categories, Industry Achievement, Print Design, Printing, Technology and Environmental.

The 2019 awards were presented at a gala event in Toronto and a total of 113 gold, silver and bronze awards were presented.

We are thrilled that the newest member of our ProMach Labeling & Coding family, Jet Label swept the awards in the Digital Label category, winning gold, silver and bronze.

Canadian Printing Awards – Congratulations Jet Label!

 

This is a fantastic achievement and all three Jet Label submissions would have been worthy of first place. Here is the gold award and the winning label, printed for Dog Island Brewing:

Canadian Printing Awards – Congratulations Jet Label!

To show just how consistent the Jet Label quality is, this isn’t the first time our colleagues have dominated the Digital Label category at the awards. Here are the gold, silver and bronze winners from 2018 – see a trend here?

Canadian Printing Awards – Congratulations Jet Label!

Jet Label is Western Canada’s largest supplier of high-quality labels (both digital and flexo) with large investments in equipment and a super team of motivated professionals. A great addition to the ProMach family.

With 7 label converting and printing plants across the United States and Canada, ProMach is your local label company with national reach and support. Combining our labels with ID Technology and EPI labeling equipment is the best way to ensure your products project the right image.

Want to get started improving your labels and labeling? Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3. You can also email me at david.holliday@promachbuilt.com. We’ll be sure to get you in touch with an expert, right in your area!

[post_excerpt] => The Canadian Printing Awards is an annual event, currently in its 14th year, that celebrates the excellence and innovation of the printing industry in Canada. The awards cover a wide range of print and printing-related categories, Industry Achievement, Print Design, Printing, Technology and Environmental. The 2019 awards were presented at a gala event in Toronto […] [post_date_gmt] => 2019-11-08 22:12:39 [post_date] => 2019-11-08 22:12:39 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-11-08 22:12:39 [post_modified] => 2019-11-08 22:12:39 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => http://www.labelingnews.com/?p=5966 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Labeling News [syndication_source_uri] => http://www.labelingnews.com [syndication_source_id] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed_id] => 12 [syndication_permalink] => http://www.labelingnews.com/2019/11/canadian-printing-awards-congratulations-jet-label/ [syndication_item_hash] => 688fde332c4ebb0e26d74b655a18f93e [faf_featured_image] => 0 [faf_process_image] => 0,0,0 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 1625 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

FAF deciding on filters on post to be syndicated:

Product Coding for Protein Producers

Array ( [post_title] => Product Coding for Protein Producers [post_content] =>

Regardless of package type, companies that produce meat or poultry products need to add variable information to the package. This includes date and lot codes, establishment codes, regulatory agency logos, and increasingly barcodes.

In many industries, this is quite straightforward, but for protein companies, there is the added complication of the environment in which coding and packaging equipment has to operate. Cold and wet conditions are the norm and any equipment brought into the plants needs to be able to handle this as well as washdown situations.

Traditionally continuous inkjet (CIJ) printers have been used for printing variable information onto meat and poultry packaging. These printers can usually handle the harsh conditions found on the packaging lines and also produce the print quality that is good enough for the applications. Thermal inkjet (TIJ) printers have not been used in the past due to the inks being unsuitable for use on the films used for the packaging.

inkjet printing for protein companies

Over the last few years, however, there have been great advances in the chemistry of inks for TIJ printing and today, this technology is proving to be very successful at printing onto the non-porous substrates used for protein packaging.

The ink cartridges used in thermal inkjet printers ensure that there is no need to have to deal with the MEK and other solvents used in other print technologies, such as CIJ. There is no need to deal with disposing of partially used ink or additive bottles.

With no cleaning cycle needed at startup or shutdown, a thermal inkjet printer is always ready to work.

The thermal inkjet coders provided by ProMach brands, Code Tech & ID Technology, are designed to be able to get the job done in these areas. They bring all the advantages of the thermal inkjet system but include models that are available in IP65 versions, perfect for producing excellent code quality every time, regardless of the environment.

 

Reduce Maintenance & Downtime

A thermal impact printer uses familiar HP type ink cartridges. This means that every time you change the cartridge, you effectively get a new printer.

As a bonus, should you need to change the color of your print, this is accomplished by simply replacing the ink cartridge with one of the required color.

Our TIJ printers come in versions that are built to IP65 environmental protection. This means that regardless of how dirty or wet the packaging environment, the printers will operate happily.

Exceptional Print Quality

With print resolutions of up to 600×600 DPI, thermal inkjet produces perfect prints every time, even when printing very small fonts or high-density barcodes.

Inks are available that are fast drying and durable to suit just about every packaging material.

Quick and Simple Installation and Integration

Thermal inkjet printers from ID Technology and Code Tech have a small footprint, making them easy to install in your parent packaging machine, even when multiple heads are needed.

Combined with the web handling and printer traversing expertise of the Greydon brand, printers from ProMach Labeling & Coding can be integrated with every type of flexible packaging machine.

Is TIJ Always the Best Technology to Use?

No, not always.

Thermal inkjet brings some important advantages, but there are times where an alternative technology such as CIJ printing, thermal transfer, laser or ink stamping might make sense. We happen to sell a complete range of coding technologies so we can work with you to help decide which is best for your unique needs.

Want to Get Started?

How can you start improving your own packaging coding? Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3. You can also email me at dholliday@idtechnology.com We’ll get you in touch with one of our local experts right away.

[post_excerpt] => Regardless of package type, companies that produce meat or poultry products need to add variable information to the package. This includes date and lot codes, establishment codes, regulatory agency logos, and increasingly barcodes. In many industries, this is quite straightforward, but for protein companies, there is the added complication of the environment in which coding […] [post_date_gmt] => 2019-08-07 14:47:49 [post_date] => 2019-08-07 14:47:49 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-08-07 14:47:49 [post_modified] => 2019-08-07 14:47:49 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => http://www.labelingnews.com/?p=5958 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Labeling News [syndication_source_uri] => http://www.labelingnews.com [syndication_source_id] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed_id] => 12 [syndication_permalink] => http://www.labelingnews.com/2019/08/product-coding-for-protein-producers/ [syndication_item_hash] => bf79e38cb1b9f7707482459ba38d1477 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 1625 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

Doing filter:faf_image_filter

Execute image filter

Image process

Local save:http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/washdown-codetech.jpg

Image process :: Saving local image

grab remote location : http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/washdown-codetech.jpg

Image exists, checking for same file size

Replacing images : inkjet printing for protein companies - inkjet printing for protein companies ON

Regardless of package type, companies that produce meat or poultry products need to add variable information to the package. This includes date and lot codes, establishment codes, regulatory agency logos, and increasingly barcodes.

In many industries, this is quite straightforward, but for protein companies, there is the added complication of the environment in which coding and packaging equipment has to operate. Cold and wet conditions are the norm and any equipment brought into the plants needs to be able to handle this as well as washdown situations.

Traditionally continuous inkjet (CIJ) printers have been used for printing variable information onto meat and poultry packaging. These printers can usually handle the harsh conditions found on the packaging lines and also produce the print quality that is good enough for the applications. Thermal inkjet (TIJ) printers have not been used in the past due to the inks being unsuitable for use on the films used for the packaging.

inkjet printing for protein companies

Over the last few years, however, there have been great advances in the chemistry of inks for TIJ printing and today, this technology is proving to be very successful at printing onto the non-porous substrates used for protein packaging.

The ink cartridges used in thermal inkjet printers ensure that there is no need to have to deal with the MEK and other solvents used in other print technologies, such as CIJ. There is no need to deal with disposing of partially used ink or additive bottles.

With no cleaning cycle needed at startup or shutdown, a thermal inkjet printer is always ready to work.

The thermal inkjet coders provided by ProMach brands, Code Tech & ID Technology, are designed to be able to get the job done in these areas. They bring all the advantages of the thermal inkjet system but include models that are available in IP65 versions, perfect for producing excellent code quality every time, regardless of the environment.

 

Reduce Maintenance & Downtime

A thermal impact printer uses familiar HP type ink cartridges. This means that every time you change the cartridge, you effectively get a new printer.

As a bonus, should you need to change the color of your print, this is accomplished by simply replacing the ink cartridge with one of the required color.

Our TIJ printers come in versions that are built to IP65 environmental protection. This means that regardless of how dirty or wet the packaging environment, the printers will operate happily.

Exceptional Print Quality

With print resolutions of up to 600×600 DPI, thermal inkjet produces perfect prints every time, even when printing very small fonts or high-density barcodes.

Inks are available that are fast drying and durable to suit just about every packaging material.

Quick and Simple Installation and Integration

Thermal inkjet printers from ID Technology and Code Tech have a small footprint, making them easy to install in your parent packaging machine, even when multiple heads are needed.

Combined with the web handling and printer traversing expertise of the Greydon brand, printers from ProMach Labeling & Coding can be integrated with every type of flexible packaging machine.

Is TIJ Always the Best Technology to Use?

No, not always.

Thermal inkjet brings some important advantages, but there are times where an alternative technology such as CIJ printing, thermal transfer, laser or ink stamping might make sense. We happen to sell a complete range of coding technologies so we can work with you to help decide which is best for your unique needs.

Want to Get Started?

How can you start improving your own packaging coding? Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3. You can also email me at dholliday@idtechnology.com We’ll get you in touch with one of our local experts right away.

Local save:http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/tij-protein-samples.jpg

Image process :: Saving local image

grab remote location : http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/tij-protein-samples.jpg

Image exists, checking for same file size

Replacing images : - ON

Regardless of package type, companies that produce meat or poultry products need to add variable information to the package. This includes date and lot codes, establishment codes, regulatory agency logos, and increasingly barcodes.

In many industries, this is quite straightforward, but for protein companies, there is the added complication of the environment in which coding and packaging equipment has to operate. Cold and wet conditions are the norm and any equipment brought into the plants needs to be able to handle this as well as washdown situations.

Traditionally continuous inkjet (CIJ) printers have been used for printing variable information onto meat and poultry packaging. These printers can usually handle the harsh conditions found on the packaging lines and also produce the print quality that is good enough for the applications. Thermal inkjet (TIJ) printers have not been used in the past due to the inks being unsuitable for use on the films used for the packaging.

Product Coding for Protein Producers

Over the last few years, however, there have been great advances in the chemistry of inks for TIJ printing and today, this technology is proving to be very successful at printing onto the non-porous substrates used for protein packaging.

The ink cartridges used in thermal inkjet printers ensure that there is no need to have to deal with the MEK and other solvents used in other print technologies, such as CIJ. There is no need to deal with disposing of partially used ink or additive bottles.

With no cleaning cycle needed at startup or shutdown, a thermal inkjet printer is always ready to work.

The thermal inkjet coders provided by ProMach brands, Code Tech & ID Technology, are designed to be able to get the job done in these areas. They bring all the advantages of the thermal inkjet system but include models that are available in IP65 versions, perfect for producing excellent code quality every time, regardless of the environment.

 

Reduce Maintenance & Downtime

A thermal impact printer uses familiar HP type ink cartridges. This means that every time you change the cartridge, you effectively get a new printer.

As a bonus, should you need to change the color of your print, this is accomplished by simply replacing the ink cartridge with one of the required color.

Our TIJ printers come in versions that are built to IP65 environmental protection. This means that regardless of how dirty or wet the packaging environment, the printers will operate happily.

Exceptional Print Quality

With print resolutions of up to 600×600 DPI, thermal inkjet produces perfect prints every time, even when printing very small fonts or high-density barcodes.

Inks are available that are fast drying and durable to suit just about every packaging material.

Quick and Simple Installation and Integration

Thermal inkjet printers from ID Technology and Code Tech have a small footprint, making them easy to install in your parent packaging machine, even when multiple heads are needed.

Combined with the web handling and printer traversing expertise of the Greydon brand, printers from ProMach Labeling & Coding can be integrated with every type of flexible packaging machine.

Is TIJ Always the Best Technology to Use?

No, not always.

Thermal inkjet brings some important advantages, but there are times where an alternative technology such as CIJ printing, thermal transfer, laser or ink stamping might make sense. We happen to sell a complete range of coding technologies so we can work with you to help decide which is best for your unique needs.

Want to Get Started?

How can you start improving your own packaging coding? Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3. You can also email me at dholliday@idtechnology.com We’ll get you in touch with one of our local experts right away.

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Regardless of package type, companies that produce meat or poultry products need to add variable information to the package. This includes date and lot codes, establishment codes, regulatory agency logos, and increasingly barcodes.

In many industries, this is quite straightforward, but for protein companies, there is the added complication of the environment in which coding and packaging equipment has to operate. Cold and wet conditions are the norm and any equipment brought into the plants needs to be able to handle this as well as washdown situations.

Traditionally continuous inkjet (CIJ) printers have been used for printing variable information onto meat and poultry packaging. These printers can usually handle the harsh conditions found on the packaging lines and also produce the print quality that is good enough for the applications. Thermal inkjet (TIJ) printers have not been used in the past due to the inks being unsuitable for use on the films used for the packaging.

Product Coding for Protein Producers

Over the last few years, however, there have been great advances in the chemistry of inks for TIJ printing and today, this technology is proving to be very successful at printing onto the non-porous substrates used for protein packaging.Product Coding for Protein Producers

The ink cartridges used in thermal inkjet printers ensure that there is no need to have to deal with the MEK and other solvents used in other print technologies, such as CIJ. There is no need to deal with disposing of partially used ink or additive bottles.

With no cleaning cycle needed at startup or shutdown, a thermal inkjet printer is always ready to work.

The thermal inkjet coders provided by ProMach brands, Code Tech & ID Technology, are designed to be able to get the job done in these areas. They bring all the advantages of the thermal inkjet system but include models that are available in IP65 versions, perfect for producing excellent code quality every time, regardless of the environment.

 

Reduce Maintenance & Downtime

A thermal impact printer uses familiar HP type ink cartridges. This means that every time you change the cartridge, you effectively get a new printer.

As a bonus, should you need to change the color of your print, this is accomplished by simply replacing the ink cartridge with one of the required color.

Our TIJ printers come in versions that are built to IP65 environmental protection. This means that regardless of how dirty or wet the packaging environment, the printers will operate happily.

Exceptional Print Quality

With print resolutions of up to 600×600 DPI, thermal inkjet produces perfect prints every time, even when printing very small fonts or high-density barcodes.

Inks are available that are fast drying and durable to suit just about every packaging material.

Quick and Simple Installation and Integration

Thermal inkjet printers from ID Technology and Code Tech have a small footprint, making them easy to install in your parent packaging machine, even when multiple heads are needed.

Combined with the web handling and printer traversing expertise of the Greydon brand, printers from ProMach Labeling & Coding can be integrated with every type of flexible packaging machine.

Is TIJ Always the Best Technology to Use?

No, not always.

Thermal inkjet brings some important advantages, but there are times where an alternative technology such as CIJ printing, thermal transfer, laser or ink stamping might make sense. We happen to sell a complete range of coding technologies so we can work with you to help decide which is best for your unique needs.

Want to Get Started?

How can you start improving your own packaging coding? Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3. You can also email me at dholliday@idtechnology.com We’ll get you in touch with one of our local experts right away.

[post_excerpt] => Regardless of package type, companies that produce meat or poultry products need to add variable information to the package. This includes date and lot codes, establishment codes, regulatory agency logos, and increasingly barcodes. In many industries, this is quite straightforward, but for protein companies, there is the added complication of the environment in which coding […] [post_date_gmt] => 2019-08-07 14:47:49 [post_date] => 2019-08-07 14:47:49 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-08-07 14:47:49 [post_modified] => 2019-08-07 14:47:49 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => http://www.labelingnews.com/?p=5958 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Labeling News [syndication_source_uri] => http://www.labelingnews.com [syndication_source_id] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed_id] => 12 [syndication_permalink] => http://www.labelingnews.com/2019/08/product-coding-for-protein-producers/ [syndication_item_hash] => bf79e38cb1b9f7707482459ba38d1477 [faf_featured_image] => 0 [faf_process_image] => 0,0 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 1625 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

FAF deciding on filters on post to be syndicated:

Customer Engagement and More – GS1 Digital Link

Array ( [post_title] => Customer Engagement and More – GS1 Digital Link [post_content] =>

Using barcodes on packages for customer engagement? This idea is certainly not new – here is a link to a Packaging World article on this very topic from 2011.

The article specifically mentioned that QR codes would provide the ability to download coupons, enter contests, play games, and other fun activities – all powered by those little barcodes.

This all seemed quite exciting, but QR codes got old quickly and the concept seemed to fade away.

Fast forward to today and there is renewed interest in using packaging to actively engage with customers.

Listen to our GS1 Digital Link Podcast

Traditional ways to communicate to customers such as TV and print advertising are not performing as well as In the past.  These are also a one-way form of communication, yelling a message at consumers – no wonder they don’t work as well as in the past. In addition, engagement on a brand’s social media pages is in decline as well. What is a marketer to do?

As a result of all this, brand owners have a renewed interest trying to set up a direct connection to their customers based on the product packaging – the package is potentially the ultimate marketing tool.
Enter smart packaging – a means to allow brands to connect directly with their customers. Generally, a smart package will allow the customer to scan a barcode (yes, usually a QR Code) and be connected to an interactive website.

So QR codes are back – a lot of brands are using them – some quite creatively

Currently, there isn’t a standard to use QR codes  (or any type of barcode) for customer engagement so brands are tending to encode them in different ways – often just a URL, sometimes other data.
Of course, the package’s UPC  barcode still needs to be there so most items would have to have multiple barcodes – rather messy and takes up more space on the package.
The product UPC codes scanned at the point of sale haven’t really changed in the 45 years since the concept was introduced.

Wouldn’t it be great if, rather than have multiple barcodes on a package, a single one could contain the UPC data, weblink for customer engagement? Maybe we can!

Last year GS1 our favorite standards organization came out with a new concept: GS1 Digital Link.

While the name might not be too exciting, Digital Link has the potential to revolutionize how barcoding is used, to add true customer engagement and to (yes really) provide item-level serialization and traceability.
For primary packaging (what we would buy in a store), GS1’s barcoding is built around the concept of the Global Trade Item Number – GTIN. This is what is encoded in the common UPC barcode that is scanned at the checkout.
The GTIN in the item barcode basically consists of a company prefix and an SKU or stock keeping unit number. The GTIN identifies a type of product – a 12oz can of Pepsi Cola or an 8 oz bag of salt n vinegar Lay’s chips for example. Every item sold at retail and many other products that use the GS1 system (such as pharmaceutical or medical products) has a GTIN.
It is important to note that a GTIN doesn’t identify an individual item – every 12oz can of Pepsi will have the same GTIN.
Also, no additional data can be encoded in the product barcode – only the 12 digit UPC in the US or 13 digit EAN code internationally. This is why additional barcodes must currently be added to a package in the event a brand owner wants to encode more data.
Traditionally, barcodes in the GS1 system have been used in the supply chain from manufacturer to point of sale. They lose their usefulness once the product has been sold. GS1 Digital Link promises to extend the reach of the GS1 system all the way from the manufacturer to consumer and to provide a means of interaction between the brand owner and the consumer.

So how does it work?

For the first time, GS1 is allowing a 2D QR barcode to be used as the barcode for point of sale.
Encoded within the barcode is a URI (unique resource identifier – an example of which is the familiar website URLs we use every day) and a number of other possible data fields that include:
GTIN
Lot number
Serial number
The expiration date and many more
Some examples:
Note, the examples use the domain id.gs1.org, but brand owners can use their own domains.
An interesting addition to the new specification is that the data fields can be identified by either using the familiar GS1 Application Identifiers (AI) or by text identifiers. Note that this is only a quick intro, so check out the GS1 Digital Link specification to get complete information.
  The ability to include all this data in one barcode means that only one barcode needs to be printed on the package and it can be used for point of sale, traceability, anti-counterfeit and for customer engagement by sending a consumer who scans the code to an interactive website.
GS1 Digital Link could prove to be the biggest revolution in barcoding since the first code was scanned in a store 45 years ago.

When will this start?

It is going to take a while and we can expect to see both traditional UPC codes and the new QR codes used side by side until the infrastructure is in place to handle the new 2D barcodes.
 A survey carried out by the food marketing institute found that in the US nearly 40% of POS scanners are capable of reading 2D codes today and that will increase to about 55% by 2022.
The POS systems to handle the data are running somewhat behind, with an estimated 20% of systems being able to handle this data.
There is clearly a ways to go.
In the same survey, stakeholders saw the advantages of switching to data-rich solutions such as follows:
60% stated better inventory accuracy
40% stated better customer engagement
36% stated anti-counterfeit
35% stated improved recall control
33% stated expiration date control
* Yes, people could choose more than one.
Finally, 85% of stakeholders see 3-5 years to get a higher data density solution to the current UPC established.
So there is certainly a lot of interest in GS1 Digital Link. While I’ve discussed the use of QR codes in this podcast, other data carriers that could be used (and be very interesting) are NFC RFID tags and the Digimarc system that turns the complete package into the barcode. Digimarc will be the topic of a future podcast.
Should be interesting days ahead.
How can we help you meet your objectives for your labeling and barcode operations? Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3. You can also email me at dholliday@idtechnology.com. We’ll be sure to get you in touch with an expert, right in your area!
[post_excerpt] => Using barcodes on packages for customer engagement? This idea is certainly not new – here is a link to a Packaging World article on this very topic from 2011. The article specifically mentioned that QR codes would provide the ability to download coupons, enter contests, play games, and other fun activities – all powered by […] [post_date_gmt] => 2019-08-05 18:10:41 [post_date] => 2019-08-05 18:10:41 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-08-05 18:10:41 [post_modified] => 2019-08-05 18:10:41 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => http://www.labelingnews.com/?p=5952 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Labeling News [syndication_source_uri] => http://www.labelingnews.com [syndication_source_id] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed_id] => 12 [syndication_permalink] => http://www.labelingnews.com/2019/08/customer-engagement-and-more-gs1-digital-link/ [syndication_item_hash] => 1e5148b5aacb103170db86cec5f4b5cf ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 1625 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

Doing filter:faf_image_filter

Execute image filter

Image process

Local save:http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/GS1DL-HEADER.jpg

Image process :: Saving local image

grab remote location : http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/GS1DL-HEADER.jpg

Image exists, checking for same file size

Replacing images : - ON

Using barcodes on packages for customer engagement? This idea is certainly not new – here is a link to a Packaging World article on this very topic from 2011.

The article specifically mentioned that QR codes would provide the ability to download coupons, enter contests, play games, and other fun activities – all powered by those little barcodes.

This all seemed quite exciting, but QR codes got old quickly and the concept seemed to fade away.

Fast forward to today and there is renewed interest in using packaging to actively engage with customers.

Listen to our GS1 Digital Link Podcast

Traditional ways to communicate to customers such as TV and print advertising are not performing as well as In the past.  These are also a one-way form of communication, yelling a message at consumers – no wonder they don’t work as well as in the past. In addition, engagement on a brand’s social media pages is in decline as well. What is a marketer to do?

As a result of all this, brand owners have a renewed interest trying to set up a direct connection to their customers based on the product packaging – the package is potentially the ultimate marketing tool.
Enter smart packaging – a means to allow brands to connect directly with their customers. Generally, a smart package will allow the customer to scan a barcode (yes, usually a QR Code) and be connected to an interactive website.

So QR codes are back – a lot of brands are using them – some quite creatively

Currently, there isn’t a standard to use QR codes  (or any type of barcode) for customer engagement so brands are tending to encode them in different ways – often just a URL, sometimes other data.
Of course, the package’s UPC  barcode still needs to be there so most items would have to have multiple barcodes – rather messy and takes up more space on the package.
The product UPC codes scanned at the point of sale haven’t really changed in the 45 years since the concept was introduced.

Wouldn’t it be great if, rather than have multiple barcodes on a package, a single one could contain the UPC data, weblink for customer engagement? Maybe we can!

Last year GS1 our favorite standards organization came out with a new concept: GS1 Digital Link.

While the name might not be too exciting, Digital Link has the potential to revolutionize how barcoding is used, to add true customer engagement and to (yes really) provide item-level serialization and traceability.
For primary packaging (what we would buy in a store), GS1’s barcoding is built around the concept of the Global Trade Item Number – GTIN. This is what is encoded in the common UPC barcode that is scanned at the checkout.
The GTIN in the item barcode basically consists of a company prefix and an SKU or stock keeping unit number. The GTIN identifies a type of product – a 12oz can of Pepsi Cola or an 8 oz bag of salt n vinegar Lay’s chips for example. Every item sold at retail and many other products that use the GS1 system (such as pharmaceutical or medical products) has a GTIN.
It is important to note that a GTIN doesn’t identify an individual item – every 12oz can of Pepsi will have the same GTIN.
Also, no additional data can be encoded in the product barcode – only the 12 digit UPC in the US or 13 digit EAN code internationally. This is why additional barcodes must currently be added to a package in the event a brand owner wants to encode more data.
Traditionally, barcodes in the GS1 system have been used in the supply chain from manufacturer to point of sale. They lose their usefulness once the product has been sold. GS1 Digital Link promises to extend the reach of the GS1 system all the way from the manufacturer to consumer and to provide a means of interaction between the brand owner and the consumer.

So how does it work?

For the first time, GS1 is allowing a 2D QR barcode to be used as the barcode for point of sale.
Encoded within the barcode is a URI (unique resource identifier – an example of which is the familiar website URLs we use every day) and a number of other possible data fields that include:
GTIN
Lot number
Serial number
The expiration date and many more
Some examples:
Note, the examples use the domain id.gs1.org, but brand owners can use their own domains.
An interesting addition to the new specification is that the data fields can be identified by either using the familiar GS1 Application Identifiers (AI) or by text identifiers. Note that this is only a quick intro, so check out the GS1 Digital Link specification to get complete information.
  The ability to include all this data in one barcode means that only one barcode needs to be printed on the package and it can be used for point of sale, traceability, anti-counterfeit and for customer engagement by sending a consumer who scans the code to an interactive website.
GS1 Digital Link could prove to be the biggest revolution in barcoding since the first code was scanned in a store 45 years ago.

When will this start?

It is going to take a while and we can expect to see both traditional UPC codes and the new QR codes used side by side until the infrastructure is in place to handle the new 2D barcodes.
 A survey carried out by the food marketing institute found that in the US nearly 40% of POS scanners are capable of reading 2D codes today and that will increase to about 55% by 2022.
The POS systems to handle the data are running somewhat behind, with an estimated 20% of systems being able to handle this data.
There is clearly a ways to go.
In the same survey, stakeholders saw the advantages of switching to data-rich solutions such as follows:
60% stated better inventory accuracy
40% stated better customer engagement
36% stated anti-counterfeit
35% stated improved recall control
33% stated expiration date control
* Yes, people could choose more than one.
Finally, 85% of stakeholders see 3-5 years to get a higher data density solution to the current UPC established.
So there is certainly a lot of interest in GS1 Digital Link. While I’ve discussed the use of QR codes in this podcast, other data carriers that could be used (and be very interesting) are NFC RFID tags and the Digimarc system that turns the complete package into the barcode. Digimarc will be the topic of a future podcast.
Should be interesting days ahead.
How can we help you meet your objectives for your labeling and barcode operations? Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3. You can also email me at dholliday@idtechnology.com. We’ll be sure to get you in touch with an expert, right in your area!

Local save:http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/LNPodcastImage-150x150.jpg

Image process :: Saving local image

grab remote location : http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/LNPodcastImage-150x150.jpg

Image exists, checking for same file size

Replacing images : - ON

Customer Engagement and More – GS1 Digital Link

Using barcodes on packages for customer engagement? This idea is certainly not new – here is a link to a Packaging World article on this very topic from 2011.

The article specifically mentioned that QR codes would provide the ability to download coupons, enter contests, play games, and other fun activities – all powered by those little barcodes.

This all seemed quite exciting, but QR codes got old quickly and the concept seemed to fade away.

Fast forward to today and there is renewed interest in using packaging to actively engage with customers.

Listen to our GS1 Digital Link Podcast

Traditional ways to communicate to customers such as TV and print advertising are not performing as well as In the past.  These are also a one-way form of communication, yelling a message at consumers – no wonder they don’t work as well as in the past. In addition, engagement on a brand’s social media pages is in decline as well. What is a marketer to do?

As a result of all this, brand owners have a renewed interest trying to set up a direct connection to their customers based on the product packaging – the package is potentially the ultimate marketing tool.
Enter smart packaging – a means to allow brands to connect directly with their customers. Generally, a smart package will allow the customer to scan a barcode (yes, usually a QR Code) and be connected to an interactive website.

So QR codes are back – a lot of brands are using them – some quite creatively

Currently, there isn’t a standard to use QR codes  (or any type of barcode) for customer engagement so brands are tending to encode them in different ways – often just a URL, sometimes other data.
Of course, the package’s UPC  barcode still needs to be there so most items would have to have multiple barcodes – rather messy and takes up more space on the package.
The product UPC codes scanned at the point of sale haven’t really changed in the 45 years since the concept was introduced.

Wouldn’t it be great if, rather than have multiple barcodes on a package, a single one could contain the UPC data, weblink for customer engagement? Maybe we can!

Last year GS1 our favorite standards organization came out with a new concept: GS1 Digital Link.

While the name might not be too exciting, Digital Link has the potential to revolutionize how barcoding is used, to add true customer engagement and to (yes really) provide item-level serialization and traceability.
For primary packaging (what we would buy in a store), GS1’s barcoding is built around the concept of the Global Trade Item Number – GTIN. This is what is encoded in the common UPC barcode that is scanned at the checkout.
The GTIN in the item barcode basically consists of a company prefix and an SKU or stock keeping unit number. The GTIN identifies a type of product – a 12oz can of Pepsi Cola or an 8 oz bag of salt n vinegar Lay’s chips for example. Every item sold at retail and many other products that use the GS1 system (such as pharmaceutical or medical products) has a GTIN.
It is important to note that a GTIN doesn’t identify an individual item – every 12oz can of Pepsi will have the same GTIN.
Also, no additional data can be encoded in the product barcode – only the 12 digit UPC in the US or 13 digit EAN code internationally. This is why additional barcodes must currently be added to a package in the event a brand owner wants to encode more data.
Traditionally, barcodes in the GS1 system have been used in the supply chain from manufacturer to point of sale. They lose their usefulness once the product has been sold. GS1 Digital Link promises to extend the reach of the GS1 system all the way from the manufacturer to consumer and to provide a means of interaction between the brand owner and the consumer.

So how does it work?

For the first time, GS1 is allowing a 2D QR barcode to be used as the barcode for point of sale.
Encoded within the barcode is a URI (unique resource identifier – an example of which is the familiar website URLs we use every day) and a number of other possible data fields that include:
GTIN
Lot number
Serial number
The expiration date and many more
Some examples:
Note, the examples use the domain id.gs1.org, but brand owners can use their own domains.
An interesting addition to the new specification is that the data fields can be identified by either using the familiar GS1 Application Identifiers (AI) or by text identifiers. Note that this is only a quick intro, so check out the GS1 Digital Link specification to get complete information.
  The ability to include all this data in one barcode means that only one barcode needs to be printed on the package and it can be used for point of sale, traceability, anti-counterfeit and for customer engagement by sending a consumer who scans the code to an interactive website.
GS1 Digital Link could prove to be the biggest revolution in barcoding since the first code was scanned in a store 45 years ago.

When will this start?

It is going to take a while and we can expect to see both traditional UPC codes and the new QR codes used side by side until the infrastructure is in place to handle the new 2D barcodes.
 A survey carried out by the food marketing institute found that in the US nearly 40% of POS scanners are capable of reading 2D codes today and that will increase to about 55% by 2022.
The POS systems to handle the data are running somewhat behind, with an estimated 20% of systems being able to handle this data.
There is clearly a ways to go.
In the same survey, stakeholders saw the advantages of switching to data-rich solutions such as follows:
60% stated better inventory accuracy
40% stated better customer engagement
36% stated anti-counterfeit
35% stated improved recall control
33% stated expiration date control
* Yes, people could choose more than one.
Finally, 85% of stakeholders see 3-5 years to get a higher data density solution to the current UPC established.
So there is certainly a lot of interest in GS1 Digital Link. While I’ve discussed the use of QR codes in this podcast, other data carriers that could be used (and be very interesting) are NFC RFID tags and the Digimarc system that turns the complete package into the barcode. Digimarc will be the topic of a future podcast.
Should be interesting days ahead.
How can we help you meet your objectives for your labeling and barcode operations? Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3. You can also email me at dholliday@idtechnology.com. We’ll be sure to get you in touch with an expert, right in your area!

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Customer Engagement and More – GS1 Digital Link

Using barcodes on packages for customer engagement? This idea is certainly not new – here is a link to a Packaging World article on this very topic from 2011.

The article specifically mentioned that QR codes would provide the ability to download coupons, enter contests, play games, and other fun activities – all powered by those little barcodes.

This all seemed quite exciting, but QR codes got old quickly and the concept seemed to fade away.

Fast forward to today and there is renewed interest in using packaging to actively engage with customers.

Customer Engagement and More – GS1 Digital Link

Listen to our GS1 Digital Link Podcast

Traditional ways to communicate to customers such as TV and print advertising are not performing as well as In the past.  These are also a one-way form of communication, yelling a message at consumers – no wonder they don’t work as well as in the past. In addition, engagement on a brand’s social media pages is in decline as well. What is a marketer to do?

As a result of all this, brand owners have a renewed interest trying to set up a direct connection to their customers based on the product packaging – the package is potentially the ultimate marketing tool.
Enter smart packaging – a means to allow brands to connect directly with their customers. Generally, a smart package will allow the customer to scan a barcode (yes, usually a QR Code) and be connected to an interactive website.

So QR codes are back – a lot of brands are using them – some quite creatively

Currently, there isn’t a standard to use QR codes  (or any type of barcode) for customer engagement so brands are tending to encode them in different ways – often just a URL, sometimes other data.
Of course, the package’s UPC  barcode still needs to be there so most items would have to have multiple barcodes – rather messy and takes up more space on the package.
The product UPC codes scanned at the point of sale haven’t really changed in the 45 years since the concept was introduced.

Wouldn’t it be great if, rather than have multiple barcodes on a package, a single one could contain the UPC data, weblink for customer engagement? Maybe we can!

Last year GS1 our favorite standards organization came out with a new concept: GS1 Digital Link.

While the name might not be too exciting, Digital Link has the potential to revolutionize how barcoding is used, to add true customer engagement and to (yes really) provide item-level serialization and traceability.
For primary packaging (what we would buy in a store), GS1’s barcoding is built around the concept of the Global Trade Item Number – GTIN. This is what is encoded in the common UPC barcode that is scanned at the checkout.
The GTIN in the item barcode basically consists of a company prefix and an SKU or stock keeping unit number. The GTIN identifies a type of product – a 12oz can of Pepsi Cola or an 8 oz bag of salt n vinegar Lay’s chips for example. Every item sold at retail and many other products that use the GS1 system (such as pharmaceutical or medical products) has a GTIN.
It is important to note that a GTIN doesn’t identify an individual item – every 12oz can of Pepsi will have the same GTIN.
Also, no additional data can be encoded in the product barcode – only the 12 digit UPC in the US or 13 digit EAN code internationally. This is why additional barcodes must currently be added to a package in the event a brand owner wants to encode more data.
Traditionally, barcodes in the GS1 system have been used in the supply chain from manufacturer to point of sale. They lose their usefulness once the product has been sold. GS1 Digital Link promises to extend the reach of the GS1 system all the way from the manufacturer to consumer and to provide a means of interaction between the brand owner and the consumer.

So how does it work?

For the first time, GS1 is allowing a 2D QR barcode to be used as the barcode for point of sale.
Encoded within the barcode is a URI (unique resource identifier – an example of which is the familiar website URLs we use every day) and a number of other possible data fields that include:
GTIN
Lot number
Serial number
The expiration date and many more
Some examples:
Note, the examples use the domain id.gs1.org, but brand owners can use their own domains.
An interesting addition to the new specification is that the data fields can be identified by either using the familiar GS1 Application Identifiers (AI) or by text identifiers. Note that this is only a quick intro, so check out the GS1 Digital Link specification to get complete information.
  The ability to include all this data in one barcode means that only one barcode needs to be printed on the package and it can be used for point of sale, traceability, anti-counterfeit and for customer engagement by sending a consumer who scans the code to an interactive website.
GS1 Digital Link could prove to be the biggest revolution in barcoding since the first code was scanned in a store 45 years ago.

When will this start?

It is going to take a while and we can expect to see both traditional UPC codes and the new QR codes used side by side until the infrastructure is in place to handle the new 2D barcodes.
 A survey carried out by the food marketing institute found that in the US nearly 40% of POS scanners are capable of reading 2D codes today and that will increase to about 55% by 2022.
The POS systems to handle the data are running somewhat behind, with an estimated 20% of systems being able to handle this data.
There is clearly a ways to go.
In the same survey, stakeholders saw the advantages of switching to data-rich solutions such as follows:
60% stated better inventory accuracy
40% stated better customer engagement
36% stated anti-counterfeit
35% stated improved recall control
33% stated expiration date control
* Yes, people could choose more than one.
Finally, 85% of stakeholders see 3-5 years to get a higher data density solution to the current UPC established.
So there is certainly a lot of interest in GS1 Digital Link. While I’ve discussed the use of QR codes in this podcast, other data carriers that could be used (and be very interesting) are NFC RFID tags and the Digimarc system that turns the complete package into the barcode. Digimarc will be the topic of a future podcast.
Should be interesting days ahead.
How can we help you meet your objectives for your labeling and barcode operations? Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3. You can also email me at dholliday@idtechnology.com. We’ll be sure to get you in touch with an expert, right in your area!

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Image exists, checking for same file size

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Customer Engagement and More – GS1 Digital Link

Using barcodes on packages for customer engagement? This idea is certainly not new – here is a link to a Packaging World article on this very topic from 2011.

The article specifically mentioned that QR codes would provide the ability to download coupons, enter contests, play games, and other fun activities – all powered by those little barcodes.

This all seemed quite exciting, but QR codes got old quickly and the concept seemed to fade away.

Fast forward to today and there is renewed interest in using packaging to actively engage with customers.

Customer Engagement and More – GS1 Digital Link

Listen to our GS1 Digital Link Podcast

Traditional ways to communicate to customers such as TV and print advertising are not performing as well as In the past.  These are also a one-way form of communication, yelling a message at consumers – no wonder they don’t work as well as in the past. In addition, engagement on a brand’s social media pages is in decline as well. What is a marketer to do?

As a result of all this, brand owners have a renewed interest trying to set up a direct connection to their customers based on the product packaging – the package is potentially the ultimate marketing tool.
Enter smart packaging – a means to allow brands to connect directly with their customers. Generally, a smart package will allow the customer to scan a barcode (yes, usually a QR Code) and be connected to an interactive website.

So QR codes are back – a lot of brands are using them – some quite creatively

Currently, there isn’t a standard to use QR codes  (or any type of barcode) for customer engagement so brands are tending to encode them in different ways – often just a URL, sometimes other data.
Of course, the package’s UPC  barcode still needs to be there so most items would have to have multiple barcodes – rather messy and takes up more space on the package.
The product UPC codes scanned at the point of sale haven’t really changed in the 45 years since the concept was introduced.

Wouldn’t it be great if, rather than have multiple barcodes on a package, a single one could contain the UPC data, weblink for customer engagement? Maybe we can!

Last year GS1 our favorite standards organization came out with a new concept: GS1 Digital Link.

While the name might not be too exciting, Digital Link has the potential to revolutionize how barcoding is used, to add true customer engagement and to (yes really) provide item-level serialization and traceability.
For primary packaging (what we would buy in a store), GS1’s barcoding is built around the concept of the Global Trade Item Number – GTIN. This is what is encoded in the common UPC barcode that is scanned at the checkout.
The GTIN in the item barcode basically consists of a company prefix and an SKU or stock keeping unit number. The GTIN identifies a type of product – a 12oz can of Pepsi Cola or an 8 oz bag of salt n vinegar Lay’s chips for example. Every item sold at retail and many other products that use the GS1 system (such as pharmaceutical or medical products) has a GTIN.
It is important to note that a GTIN doesn’t identify an individual item – every 12oz can of Pepsi will have the same GTIN.
Also, no additional data can be encoded in the product barcode – only the 12 digit UPC in the US or 13 digit EAN code internationally. This is why additional barcodes must currently be added to a package in the event a brand owner wants to encode more data.
Traditionally, barcodes in the GS1 system have been used in the supply chain from manufacturer to point of sale. They lose their usefulness once the product has been sold. GS1 Digital Link promises to extend the reach of the GS1 system all the way from the manufacturer to consumer and to provide a means of interaction between the brand owner and the consumer.

So how does it work?

For the first time, GS1 is allowing a 2D QR barcode to be used as the barcode for point of sale.
Encoded within the barcode is a URI (unique resource identifier – an example of which is the familiar website URLs we use every day) and a number of other possible data fields that include:
GTIN
Lot number
Serial number
The expiration date and many more
Some examples:
Note, the examples use the domain id.gs1.org, but brand owners can use their own domains.
Customer Engagement and More – GS1 Digital Link
An interesting addition to the new specification is that the data fields can be identified by either using the familiar GS1 Application Identifiers (AI) or by text identifiers. Note that this is only a quick intro, so check out the GS1 Digital Link specification to get complete information.
  The ability to include all this data in one barcode means that only one barcode needs to be printed on the package and it can be used for point of sale, traceability, anti-counterfeit and for customer engagement by sending a consumer who scans the code to an interactive website.
GS1 Digital Link could prove to be the biggest revolution in barcoding since the first code was scanned in a store 45 years ago.

When will this start?

It is going to take a while and we can expect to see both traditional UPC codes and the new QR codes used side by side until the infrastructure is in place to handle the new 2D barcodes.
 A survey carried out by the food marketing institute found that in the US nearly 40% of POS scanners are capable of reading 2D codes today and that will increase to about 55% by 2022.
The POS systems to handle the data are running somewhat behind, with an estimated 20% of systems being able to handle this data.
There is clearly a ways to go.
In the same survey, stakeholders saw the advantages of switching to data-rich solutions such as follows:
60% stated better inventory accuracy
40% stated better customer engagement
36% stated anti-counterfeit
35% stated improved recall control
33% stated expiration date control
* Yes, people could choose more than one.
Finally, 85% of stakeholders see 3-5 years to get a higher data density solution to the current UPC established.
So there is certainly a lot of interest in GS1 Digital Link. While I’ve discussed the use of QR codes in this podcast, other data carriers that could be used (and be very interesting) are NFC RFID tags and the Digimarc system that turns the complete package into the barcode. Digimarc will be the topic of a future podcast.
Should be interesting days ahead.
How can we help you meet your objectives for your labeling and barcode operations? Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3. You can also email me at dholliday@idtechnology.com. We’ll be sure to get you in touch with an expert, right in your area!

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Customer Engagement and More – GS1 Digital Link

Using barcodes on packages for customer engagement? This idea is certainly not new – here is a link to a Packaging World article on this very topic from 2011.

The article specifically mentioned that QR codes would provide the ability to download coupons, enter contests, play games, and other fun activities – all powered by those little barcodes.

This all seemed quite exciting, but QR codes got old quickly and the concept seemed to fade away.

Fast forward to today and there is renewed interest in using packaging to actively engage with customers.

Customer Engagement and More – GS1 Digital Link

Listen to our GS1 Digital Link Podcast

Traditional ways to communicate to customers such as TV and print advertising are not performing as well as In the past.  These are also a one-way form of communication, yelling a message at consumers – no wonder they don’t work as well as in the past. In addition, engagement on a brand’s social media pages is in decline as well. What is a marketer to do?

As a result of all this, brand owners have a renewed interest trying to set up a direct connection to their customers based on the product packaging – the package is potentially the ultimate marketing tool.
Enter smart packaging – a means to allow brands to connect directly with their customers. Generally, a smart package will allow the customer to scan a barcode (yes, usually a QR Code) and be connected to an interactive website.

So QR codes are back – a lot of brands are using them – some quite creatively

Currently, there isn’t a standard to use QR codes  (or any type of barcode) for customer engagement so brands are tending to encode them in different ways – often just a URL, sometimes other data.
Of course, the package’s UPC  barcode still needs to be there so most items would have to have multiple barcodes – rather messy and takes up more space on the package.
The product UPC codes scanned at the point of sale haven’t really changed in the 45 years since the concept was introduced.

Wouldn’t it be great if, rather than have multiple barcodes on a package, a single one could contain the UPC data, weblink for customer engagement? Maybe we can!

Last year GS1 our favorite standards organization came out with a new concept: GS1 Digital Link.

While the name might not be too exciting, Digital Link has the potential to revolutionize how barcoding is used, to add true customer engagement and to (yes really) provide item-level serialization and traceability.
For primary packaging (what we would buy in a store), GS1’s barcoding is built around the concept of the Global Trade Item Number – GTIN. This is what is encoded in the common UPC barcode that is scanned at the checkout.
The GTIN in the item barcode basically consists of a company prefix and an SKU or stock keeping unit number. The GTIN identifies a type of product – a 12oz can of Pepsi Cola or an 8 oz bag of salt n vinegar Lay’s chips for example. Every item sold at retail and many other products that use the GS1 system (such as pharmaceutical or medical products) has a GTIN.
It is important to note that a GTIN doesn’t identify an individual item – every 12oz can of Pepsi will have the same GTIN.
Also, no additional data can be encoded in the product barcode – only the 12 digit UPC in the US or 13 digit EAN code internationally. This is why additional barcodes must currently be added to a package in the event a brand owner wants to encode more data.
Traditionally, barcodes in the GS1 system have been used in the supply chain from manufacturer to point of sale. They lose their usefulness once the product has been sold. GS1 Digital Link promises to extend the reach of the GS1 system all the way from the manufacturer to consumer and to provide a means of interaction between the brand owner and the consumer.

So how does it work?

For the first time, GS1 is allowing a 2D QR barcode to be used as the barcode for point of sale.
Encoded within the barcode is a URI (unique resource identifier – an example of which is the familiar website URLs we use every day) and a number of other possible data fields that include:
GTIN
Lot number
Serial number
The expiration date and many more
Some examples:
Note, the examples use the domain id.gs1.org, but brand owners can use their own domains.
Customer Engagement and More – GS1 Digital Link
Customer Engagement and More – GS1 Digital Link
An interesting addition to the new specification is that the data fields can be identified by either using the familiar GS1 Application Identifiers (AI) or by text identifiers. Note that this is only a quick intro, so check out the GS1 Digital Link specification to get complete information.
  The ability to include all this data in one barcode means that only one barcode needs to be printed on the package and it can be used for point of sale, traceability, anti-counterfeit and for customer engagement by sending a consumer who scans the code to an interactive website.
GS1 Digital Link could prove to be the biggest revolution in barcoding since the first code was scanned in a store 45 years ago.

When will this start?

It is going to take a while and we can expect to see both traditional UPC codes and the new QR codes used side by side until the infrastructure is in place to handle the new 2D barcodes.
 A survey carried out by the food marketing institute found that in the US nearly 40% of POS scanners are capable of reading 2D codes today and that will increase to about 55% by 2022.
The POS systems to handle the data are running somewhat behind, with an estimated 20% of systems being able to handle this data.
There is clearly a ways to go.
In the same survey, stakeholders saw the advantages of switching to data-rich solutions such as follows:
60% stated better inventory accuracy
40% stated better customer engagement
36% stated anti-counterfeit
35% stated improved recall control
33% stated expiration date control
* Yes, people could choose more than one.
Finally, 85% of stakeholders see 3-5 years to get a higher data density solution to the current UPC established.
So there is certainly a lot of interest in GS1 Digital Link. While I’ve discussed the use of QR codes in this podcast, other data carriers that could be used (and be very interesting) are NFC RFID tags and the Digimarc system that turns the complete package into the barcode. Digimarc will be the topic of a future podcast.
Should be interesting days ahead.
How can we help you meet your objectives for your labeling and barcode operations? Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3. You can also email me at dholliday@idtechnology.com. We’ll be sure to get you in touch with an expert, right in your area!

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Customer Engagement and More – GS1 Digital Link

Using barcodes on packages for customer engagement? This idea is certainly not new – here is a link to a Packaging World article on this very topic from 2011.

The article specifically mentioned that QR codes would provide the ability to download coupons, enter contests, play games, and other fun activities – all powered by those little barcodes.

This all seemed quite exciting, but QR codes got old quickly and the concept seemed to fade away.

Fast forward to today and there is renewed interest in using packaging to actively engage with customers.

Customer Engagement and More – GS1 Digital Link

Listen to our GS1 Digital Link Podcast

Traditional ways to communicate to customers such as TV and print advertising are not performing as well as In the past.  These are also a one-way form of communication, yelling a message at consumers – no wonder they don’t work as well as in the past. In addition, engagement on a brand’s social media pages is in decline as well. What is a marketer to do?

As a result of all this, brand owners have a renewed interest trying to set up a direct connection to their customers based on the product packaging – the package is potentially the ultimate marketing tool.
Enter smart packaging – a means to allow brands to connect directly with their customers. Generally, a smart package will allow the customer to scan a barcode (yes, usually a QR Code) and be connected to an interactive website.

So QR codes are back – a lot of brands are using them – some quite creatively

Currently, there isn’t a standard to use QR codes  (or any type of barcode) for customer engagement so brands are tending to encode them in different ways – often just a URL, sometimes other data.
Of course, the package’s UPC  barcode still needs to be there so most items would have to have multiple barcodes – rather messy and takes up more space on the package.
The product UPC codes scanned at the point of sale haven’t really changed in the 45 years since the concept was introduced.

Wouldn’t it be great if, rather than have multiple barcodes on a package, a single one could contain the UPC data, weblink for customer engagement? Maybe we can!

Last year GS1 our favorite standards organization came out with a new concept: GS1 Digital Link.

While the name might not be too exciting, Digital Link has the potential to revolutionize how barcoding is used, to add true customer engagement and to (yes really) provide item-level serialization and traceability.
For primary packaging (what we would buy in a store), GS1’s barcoding is built around the concept of the Global Trade Item Number – GTIN. This is what is encoded in the common UPC barcode that is scanned at the checkout.
The GTIN in the item barcode basically consists of a company prefix and an SKU or stock keeping unit number. The GTIN identifies a type of product – a 12oz can of Pepsi Cola or an 8 oz bag of salt n vinegar Lay’s chips for example. Every item sold at retail and many other products that use the GS1 system (such as pharmaceutical or medical products) has a GTIN.
It is important to note that a GTIN doesn’t identify an individual item – every 12oz can of Pepsi will have the same GTIN.
Also, no additional data can be encoded in the product barcode – only the 12 digit UPC in the US or 13 digit EAN code internationally. This is why additional barcodes must currently be added to a package in the event a brand owner wants to encode more data.
Traditionally, barcodes in the GS1 system have been used in the supply chain from manufacturer to point of sale. They lose their usefulness once the product has been sold. GS1 Digital Link promises to extend the reach of the GS1 system all the way from the manufacturer to consumer and to provide a means of interaction between the brand owner and the consumer.

So how does it work?

For the first time, GS1 is allowing a 2D QR barcode to be used as the barcode for point of sale.
Encoded within the barcode is a URI (unique resource identifier – an example of which is the familiar website URLs we use every day) and a number of other possible data fields that include:
GTIN
Lot number
Serial number
The expiration date and many more
Some examples:
Note, the examples use the domain id.gs1.org, but brand owners can use their own domains.
Customer Engagement and More – GS1 Digital Link
Customer Engagement and More – GS1 Digital Link
Customer Engagement and More – GS1 Digital Link
An interesting addition to the new specification is that the data fields can be identified by either using the familiar GS1 Application Identifiers (AI) or by text identifiers. Note that this is only a quick intro, so check out the GS1 Digital Link specification to get complete information.
  The ability to include all this data in one barcode means that only one barcode needs to be printed on the package and it can be used for point of sale, traceability, anti-counterfeit and for customer engagement by sending a consumer who scans the code to an interactive website.
GS1 Digital Link could prove to be the biggest revolution in barcoding since the first code was scanned in a store 45 years ago.

When will this start?

It is going to take a while and we can expect to see both traditional UPC codes and the new QR codes used side by side until the infrastructure is in place to handle the new 2D barcodes.
 A survey carried out by the food marketing institute found that in the US nearly 40% of POS scanners are capable of reading 2D codes today and that will increase to about 55% by 2022.
The POS systems to handle the data are running somewhat behind, with an estimated 20% of systems being able to handle this data.
There is clearly a ways to go.
In the same survey, stakeholders saw the advantages of switching to data-rich solutions such as follows:
60% stated better inventory accuracy
40% stated better customer engagement
36% stated anti-counterfeit
35% stated improved recall control
33% stated expiration date control
* Yes, people could choose more than one.
Finally, 85% of stakeholders see 3-5 years to get a higher data density solution to the current UPC established.
So there is certainly a lot of interest in GS1 Digital Link. While I’ve discussed the use of QR codes in this podcast, other data carriers that could be used (and be very interesting) are NFC RFID tags and the Digimarc system that turns the complete package into the barcode. Digimarc will be the topic of a future podcast.
Should be interesting days ahead.
How can we help you meet your objectives for your labeling and barcode operations? Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3. You can also email me at dholliday@idtechnology.com. We’ll be sure to get you in touch with an expert, right in your area!
[post_excerpt] => Using barcodes on packages for customer engagement? This idea is certainly not new – here is a link to a Packaging World article on this very topic from 2011. The article specifically mentioned that QR codes would provide the ability to download coupons, enter contests, play games, and other fun activities – all powered by […] [post_date_gmt] => 2019-08-05 18:10:41 [post_date] => 2019-08-05 18:10:41 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-08-05 18:10:41 [post_modified] => 2019-08-05 18:10:41 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => http://www.labelingnews.com/?p=5952 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Labeling News [syndication_source_uri] => http://www.labelingnews.com [syndication_source_id] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed_id] => 12 [syndication_permalink] => http://www.labelingnews.com/2019/08/customer-engagement-and-more-gs1-digital-link/ [syndication_item_hash] => 1e5148b5aacb103170db86cec5f4b5cf [faf_featured_image] => 0 [faf_process_image] => 0,0,0,0,0 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 1625 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

FAF deciding on filters on post to be syndicated:

End of Parts & Service – SATO Printers

Array ( [post_title] => End of Parts & Service – SATO Printers [post_content] =>

As companies improve their products and introduce new models, earlier generations are discontinued and eventually can no longer be supported.

I recently received a reminder from SATO that some of their legacy models have reached the end of their service/support period.

Included are the following models:

SATO EOS

 

You can see the original SATO end of service notice here: SATO EOS Doc

Most users of these printers have already upgraded to current models, but if you happen to still be using any of these models, please note that by the end of August, service will end and spare parts will be limited until the end of the year, after which they can’t be ordered.

What Should You Do?

If you do use any of these discontinued printers, it is best to upgrade to a new  SATO CLNX printer. The new model has a lot of advantages and is designed to be a simple replacement for older printers. SATO also has a special trade-in program for the legacy printers that you can take advantage of. ID Technology can help you with every step of this process.

Want to Get Started?

Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3. You can also email me at dholliday@idtechnology.com. We’ll be sure to get you in touch with one of our labeling experts, right in your area.

[post_excerpt] => As companies improve their products and introduce new models, earlier generations are discontinued and eventually can no longer be supported. I recently received a reminder from SATO that some of their legacy models have reached the end of their service/support period. Included are the following models:   You can see the original SATO end of […] [post_date_gmt] => 2019-07-08 13:43:26 [post_date] => 2019-07-08 13:43:26 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-07-08 13:43:26 [post_modified] => 2019-07-08 13:43:26 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => http://www.labelingnews.com/?p=5948 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Labeling News [syndication_source_uri] => http://www.labelingnews.com [syndication_source_id] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed_id] => 12 [syndication_permalink] => http://www.labelingnews.com/2019/07/end-of-parts-service-sato-printers/ [syndication_item_hash] => ad8095d3f74bd5de50bcb5355c1f6d3e ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 1625 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

Doing filter:faf_image_filter

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Local save:http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/SATO-end-support-1.jpg

Image process :: Saving local image

grab remote location : http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/SATO-end-support-1.jpg

Image exists, checking for same file size

Replacing images : SATO EOS - SATO EOS ON

As companies improve their products and introduce new models, earlier generations are discontinued and eventually can no longer be supported.

I recently received a reminder from SATO that some of their legacy models have reached the end of their service/support period.

Included are the following models:

SATO EOS

 

You can see the original SATO end of service notice here: SATO EOS Doc

Most users of these printers have already upgraded to current models, but if you happen to still be using any of these models, please note that by the end of August, service will end and spare parts will be limited until the end of the year, after which they can’t be ordered.

What Should You Do?

If you do use any of these discontinued printers, it is best to upgrade to a new  SATO CLNX printer. The new model has a lot of advantages and is designed to be a simple replacement for older printers. SATO also has a special trade-in program for the legacy printers that you can take advantage of. ID Technology can help you with every step of this process.

Want to Get Started?

Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3. You can also email me at dholliday@idtechnology.com. We’ll be sure to get you in touch with one of our labeling experts, right in your area.

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Execute : Enclosure images

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Array ( [0] => )

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Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :End of Parts & Service – SATO Printers

Array ( [post_title] => End of Parts & Service – SATO Printers [post_content] =>

As companies improve their products and introduce new models, earlier generations are discontinued and eventually can no longer be supported.

I recently received a reminder from SATO that some of their legacy models have reached the end of their service/support period.

Included are the following models:

End of Parts & Service – SATO Printers

 

You can see the original SATO end of service notice here: SATO EOS Doc

Most users of these printers have already upgraded to current models, but if you happen to still be using any of these models, please note that by the end of August, service will end and spare parts will be limited until the end of the year, after which they can’t be ordered.

What Should You Do?

If you do use any of these discontinued printers, it is best to upgrade to a new  SATO CLNX printer. The new model has a lot of advantages and is designed to be a simple replacement for older printers. SATO also has a special trade-in program for the legacy printers that you can take advantage of. ID Technology can help you with every step of this process.

Want to Get Started?

Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3. You can also email me at dholliday@idtechnology.com. We’ll be sure to get you in touch with one of our labeling experts, right in your area.

[post_excerpt] => As companies improve their products and introduce new models, earlier generations are discontinued and eventually can no longer be supported. I recently received a reminder from SATO that some of their legacy models have reached the end of their service/support period. Included are the following models:   You can see the original SATO end of […] [post_date_gmt] => 2019-07-08 13:43:26 [post_date] => 2019-07-08 13:43:26 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-07-08 13:43:26 [post_modified] => 2019-07-08 13:43:26 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => http://www.labelingnews.com/?p=5948 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Labeling News [syndication_source_uri] => http://www.labelingnews.com [syndication_source_id] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed_id] => 12 [syndication_permalink] => http://www.labelingnews.com/2019/07/end-of-parts-service-sato-printers/ [syndication_item_hash] => ad8095d3f74bd5de50bcb5355c1f6d3e [faf_featured_image] => 0 [faf_process_image] => 0 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 1625 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

FAF deciding on filters on post to be syndicated:

Podcast – Lasers and Sustainability

Array ( [post_title] => Podcast – Lasers and Sustainability [post_content] =>

The Labeling News PodcastOur most recent podcast covered two topics:

The Loop waste-free packaging concept and how laser coding can help brands meet their sustainability targets.

In this episode I take advantage of a visit to Macsa ID in Barcelona, to chat with Macsa’s CEO Jordi Pinot on the topic of sustainability in packaging and how laser coding can help companies meet their sustainability goals.

Before this, there is a quick update on the Loop circular packaging system. Kroger is now a Loop partner here in the US as well as Walgreens. I’m still somewhat skeptical about this, but it does seem to be making progress.

Loop Waste Free Packaging Concept

On the topic of lasers for coding and marking products, Macsa has a very complete line up of laser systems for just about every application – see more info here: https://www.idtechnology.com/products/coding-solutions/laser-coders/

Laser Coding Can Help Meet Sustainability Targets

In the podcast, we discuss how laser coding allows for permanent prints to be added to all kinds of products. Lasers use no inks or solvents, making them an environmentally friendly way to add date and traceability codes as well as barcodes to many types of packaging materials.

Listen to the podcast here: Labeling News Podcast Episode 5   or search for Labeling News at Apple Podcasts or Spotify.

 

[post_excerpt] => Our most recent podcast covered two topics: The Loop waste-free packaging concept and how laser coding can help brands meet their sustainability targets. In this episode I take advantage of a visit to Macsa ID in Barcelona, to chat with Macsa’s CEO Jordi Pinot on the topic of sustainability in packaging and how laser coding […] [post_date_gmt] => 2019-06-20 12:43:21 [post_date] => 2019-06-20 12:43:21 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-06-20 12:43:21 [post_modified] => 2019-06-20 12:43:21 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => http://www.labelingnews.com/?p=5942 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Labeling News [syndication_source_uri] => http://www.labelingnews.com [syndication_source_id] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed_id] => 12 [syndication_permalink] => http://www.labelingnews.com/2019/06/podcast-lasers-and-sustainability/ [syndication_item_hash] => 0b8ad6117407d36c3ba725c7ac734c57 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 1625 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

Doing filter:faf_image_filter

Execute image filter

Image process

Local save:http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/PodcastThumbblog-150x150.jpg

Image process :: Saving local image

grab remote location : http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/PodcastThumbblog-150x150.jpg

Image exists, checking for same file size

Replacing images : The Labeling News Podcast - The Labeling News Podcast ON

The Labeling News PodcastOur most recent podcast covered two topics:

The Loop waste-free packaging concept and how laser coding can help brands meet their sustainability targets.

In this episode I take advantage of a visit to Macsa ID in Barcelona, to chat with Macsa’s CEO Jordi Pinot on the topic of sustainability in packaging and how laser coding can help companies meet their sustainability goals.

Before this, there is a quick update on the Loop circular packaging system. Kroger is now a Loop partner here in the US as well as Walgreens. I’m still somewhat skeptical about this, but it does seem to be making progress.

Loop Waste Free Packaging Concept

On the topic of lasers for coding and marking products, Macsa has a very complete line up of laser systems for just about every application – see more info here: https://www.idtechnology.com/products/coding-solutions/laser-coders/

Laser Coding Can Help Meet Sustainability Targets

In the podcast, we discuss how laser coding allows for permanent prints to be added to all kinds of products. Lasers use no inks or solvents, making them an environmentally friendly way to add date and traceability codes as well as barcodes to many types of packaging materials.

Listen to the podcast here: Labeling News Podcast Episode 5   or search for Labeling News at Apple Podcasts or Spotify.

 

Local save:http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/Loop-Packaging-Concept.jpg

Image process :: Saving local image

grab remote location : http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/Loop-Packaging-Concept.jpg

Image exists, checking for same file size

Replacing images : - ON

Podcast – Lasers and SustainabilityOur most recent podcast covered two topics:

The Loop waste-free packaging concept and how laser coding can help brands meet their sustainability targets.

In this episode I take advantage of a visit to Macsa ID in Barcelona, to chat with Macsa’s CEO Jordi Pinot on the topic of sustainability in packaging and how laser coding can help companies meet their sustainability goals.

Before this, there is a quick update on the Loop circular packaging system. Kroger is now a Loop partner here in the US as well as Walgreens. I’m still somewhat skeptical about this, but it does seem to be making progress.

Loop Waste Free Packaging Concept

On the topic of lasers for coding and marking products, Macsa has a very complete line up of laser systems for just about every application – see more info here: https://www.idtechnology.com/products/coding-solutions/laser-coders/

Laser Coding Can Help Meet Sustainability Targets

In the podcast, we discuss how laser coding allows for permanent prints to be added to all kinds of products. Lasers use no inks or solvents, making them an environmentally friendly way to add date and traceability codes as well as barcodes to many types of packaging materials.

Listen to the podcast here: Labeling News Podcast Episode 5   or search for Labeling News at Apple Podcasts or Spotify.

 

Local save:http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/lasers-sustainabilty.jpg

Image process :: Saving local image

grab remote location : http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/lasers-sustainabilty.jpg

Image exists, checking for same file size

Replacing images : - ON

Podcast – Lasers and SustainabilityOur most recent podcast covered two topics:

The Loop waste-free packaging concept and how laser coding can help brands meet their sustainability targets.

In this episode I take advantage of a visit to Macsa ID in Barcelona, to chat with Macsa’s CEO Jordi Pinot on the topic of sustainability in packaging and how laser coding can help companies meet their sustainability goals.

Before this, there is a quick update on the Loop circular packaging system. Kroger is now a Loop partner here in the US as well as Walgreens. I’m still somewhat skeptical about this, but it does seem to be making progress.

Podcast – Lasers and Sustainability

Loop Waste Free Packaging Concept

On the topic of lasers for coding and marking products, Macsa has a very complete line up of laser systems for just about every application – see more info here: https://www.idtechnology.com/products/coding-solutions/laser-coders/

Laser Coding Can Help Meet Sustainability Targets

In the podcast, we discuss how laser coding allows for permanent prints to be added to all kinds of products. Lasers use no inks or solvents, making them an environmentally friendly way to add date and traceability codes as well as barcodes to many types of packaging materials.

Listen to the podcast here: Labeling News Podcast Episode 5   or search for Labeling News at Apple Podcasts or Spotify.

 

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Execute : Enclosure images

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Array ( [0] => )

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Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :Podcast – Lasers and Sustainability

Array ( [post_title] => Podcast – Lasers and Sustainability [post_content] =>

Podcast – Lasers and SustainabilityOur most recent podcast covered two topics:

The Loop waste-free packaging concept and how laser coding can help brands meet their sustainability targets.

In this episode I take advantage of a visit to Macsa ID in Barcelona, to chat with Macsa’s CEO Jordi Pinot on the topic of sustainability in packaging and how laser coding can help companies meet their sustainability goals.

Before this, there is a quick update on the Loop circular packaging system. Kroger is now a Loop partner here in the US as well as Walgreens. I’m still somewhat skeptical about this, but it does seem to be making progress.

Podcast – Lasers and Sustainability

Loop Waste Free Packaging Concept

On the topic of lasers for coding and marking products, Macsa has a very complete line up of laser systems for just about every application – see more info here: https://www.idtechnology.com/products/coding-solutions/laser-coders/

Podcast – Lasers and Sustainability

Laser Coding Can Help Meet Sustainability Targets

In the podcast, we discuss how laser coding allows for permanent prints to be added to all kinds of products. Lasers use no inks or solvents, making them an environmentally friendly way to add date and traceability codes as well as barcodes to many types of packaging materials.

Listen to the podcast here: Labeling News Podcast Episode 5   or search for Labeling News at Apple Podcasts or Spotify.

 

[post_excerpt] => Our most recent podcast covered two topics: The Loop waste-free packaging concept and how laser coding can help brands meet their sustainability targets. In this episode I take advantage of a visit to Macsa ID in Barcelona, to chat with Macsa’s CEO Jordi Pinot on the topic of sustainability in packaging and how laser coding […] [post_date_gmt] => 2019-06-20 12:43:21 [post_date] => 2019-06-20 12:43:21 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-06-20 12:43:21 [post_modified] => 2019-06-20 12:43:21 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => http://www.labelingnews.com/?p=5942 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Labeling News [syndication_source_uri] => http://www.labelingnews.com [syndication_source_id] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed_id] => 12 [syndication_permalink] => http://www.labelingnews.com/2019/06/podcast-lasers-and-sustainability/ [syndication_item_hash] => 0b8ad6117407d36c3ba725c7ac734c57 [faf_featured_image] => 0 [faf_process_image] => 0,0,0 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 1625 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

FAF deciding on filters on post to be syndicated:

Product Handling Considerations for Barcoding on Shipping Cases

Array ( [post_title] => Product Handling Considerations for Barcoding on Shipping Cases [post_content] =>

Using inkjet printers to add variable information to shipping cases, is increasing in popularity. Using this technique can dramatically reduce the number of pre-printed items that need to be managed and fit into company efforts to increase digitalization and move to a lean workflow.

Here at ID Technology, we have a lot of experience when it comes to installing inkjet systems for printing barcodes, text and graphics onto corrugated cases. We are a founding distributor of the FoxJet ProSeries system and have won the prestigious Regency Award for top FoxJet distributor for 14 consecutive years.

If there is one thing we’ve learned over this time, it’s that having good product handling is as important as having good printing equipment for getting the high-quality, compliant GS1 barcodes that customers demand. If the boxes are not presented consistently and accurately to the printheads, this will show in poor print quality and in particular will not allow high-quality barcodes to be printed.

To help educate users on best practices for product handling, our friends at FoxJet recently produced a detailed whitepaper on this topic that goes over many of the issues that are important to ensure great quality printing every time.

FoxJet ProSeries Printers

The whitepaper the transition from the case taper or sealer to the conveyor where the barcode printers are installed as being an area of crucial importance. Because space is often limited on packaging lines, the printheads often have to be installed very close to the exit of the case sealer. Some important factors are:

Carton Control – Proximity to the Printhead

It is important that after leaving the case sealer, the boxes are correctly presented the correct distance from the printheads. The drops of ink that are fired from the printheads can only travel a short distance while maintaining accuracy. If the box is too far away, print quality will decline and if so close it hits the printhead, damage might occur.

Be sure to control the boxes gently so that the boxes are undamaged as they pass through your packaging processes.

It’s best to use guide rails to accurately control the position of the box and even better use in conjunction with FoxJet’s retracting printhead brackets. This bracket uses a roller allow the printhead to be the correct distance from the box every time.

Product/Conveyor Speed

Ensure that boxes leaving your case sealer are traveling at a speed that is within the limits of your inkjet printer. Our FoxJet ProSeries printheads are able to print high-quality text, barcodes and images at up to 300ft per minute, which is enough for all but the fastest production lines.

Angel Hair

No, we are not talking pasta here! Some case sealing machines use hot melt adhesive to hold the flaps on the boxes closed. At times the adhesive applicators can leave a stringy residue behind that can get stuck to the printheads and block the tiny nozzles. Dust from the corrugated boxes can be bad too – be sure to regularly clean your packaging equipment and the printheads.

Vibrations

Good quality printing depends on the boxes being transferred smoothly past the printheads. Make sure your conveyor belt runs smoothly and that you are not dropping boxes onto the conveyor where the printheads are mounted. We’ve seen this happen and the results are not always pretty!

Best Practice of All

The best way to get the best labeling or coding for your shipping cases is to connect with your local ID Technology representative. With many years of experience, combined with the case packing, sealing and product handling of ProMach, we are able to help you determine the best solution for all your case coding or labeling needs.

How can ID Technology and ProMach help you meet your objectives for your packaging barcode and coding operations? Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3. You can also email me at dholliday@idtechnology.com. We’ll be sure to get you in touch with an expert, right in your area!

[post_excerpt] => Using inkjet printers to add variable information to shipping cases, is increasing in popularity. Using this technique can dramatically reduce the number of pre-printed items that need to be managed and fit into company efforts to increase digitalization and move to a lean workflow. Here at ID Technology, we have a lot of experience when […] [post_date_gmt] => 2019-06-18 21:03:04 [post_date] => 2019-06-18 21:03:04 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-06-18 21:03:04 [post_modified] => 2019-06-18 21:03:04 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => http://www.labelingnews.com/?p=5937 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Labeling News [syndication_source_uri] => http://www.labelingnews.com [syndication_source_id] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed_id] => 12 [syndication_permalink] => http://www.labelingnews.com/2019/06/product-handling-considerations-for-barcoding-on-shipping-cases/ [syndication_item_hash] => 380c6e3d4f6ebf63ea44ce5e8d7bf988 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 1625 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

Doing filter:faf_image_filter

Execute image filter

Image process

Local save:http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/warehouse-pallets.jpg

Image process :: Saving local image

grab remote location : http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/warehouse-pallets.jpg

Image exists, checking for same file size

Replacing images : - ON

Using inkjet printers to add variable information to shipping cases, is increasing in popularity. Using this technique can dramatically reduce the number of pre-printed items that need to be managed and fit into company efforts to increase digitalization and move to a lean workflow.

Here at ID Technology, we have a lot of experience when it comes to installing inkjet systems for printing barcodes, text and graphics onto corrugated cases. We are a founding distributor of the FoxJet ProSeries system and have won the prestigious Regency Award for top FoxJet distributor for 14 consecutive years.

If there is one thing we’ve learned over this time, it’s that having good product handling is as important as having good printing equipment for getting the high-quality, compliant GS1 barcodes that customers demand. If the boxes are not presented consistently and accurately to the printheads, this will show in poor print quality and in particular will not allow high-quality barcodes to be printed.

To help educate users on best practices for product handling, our friends at FoxJet recently produced a detailed whitepaper on this topic that goes over many of the issues that are important to ensure great quality printing every time.

FoxJet ProSeries Printers

The whitepaper the transition from the case taper or sealer to the conveyor where the barcode printers are installed as being an area of crucial importance. Because space is often limited on packaging lines, the printheads often have to be installed very close to the exit of the case sealer. Some important factors are:

Carton Control – Proximity to the Printhead

It is important that after leaving the case sealer, the boxes are correctly presented the correct distance from the printheads. The drops of ink that are fired from the printheads can only travel a short distance while maintaining accuracy. If the box is too far away, print quality will decline and if so close it hits the printhead, damage might occur.

Be sure to control the boxes gently so that the boxes are undamaged as they pass through your packaging processes.

It’s best to use guide rails to accurately control the position of the box and even better use in conjunction with FoxJet’s retracting printhead brackets. This bracket uses a roller allow the printhead to be the correct distance from the box every time.

Product/Conveyor Speed

Ensure that boxes leaving your case sealer are traveling at a speed that is within the limits of your inkjet printer. Our FoxJet ProSeries printheads are able to print high-quality text, barcodes and images at up to 300ft per minute, which is enough for all but the fastest production lines.

Angel Hair

No, we are not talking pasta here! Some case sealing machines use hot melt adhesive to hold the flaps on the boxes closed. At times the adhesive applicators can leave a stringy residue behind that can get stuck to the printheads and block the tiny nozzles. Dust from the corrugated boxes can be bad too – be sure to regularly clean your packaging equipment and the printheads.

Vibrations

Good quality printing depends on the boxes being transferred smoothly past the printheads. Make sure your conveyor belt runs smoothly and that you are not dropping boxes onto the conveyor where the printheads are mounted. We’ve seen this happen and the results are not always pretty!

Best Practice of All

The best way to get the best labeling or coding for your shipping cases is to connect with your local ID Technology representative. With many years of experience, combined with the case packing, sealing and product handling of ProMach, we are able to help you determine the best solution for all your case coding or labeling needs.

How can ID Technology and ProMach help you meet your objectives for your packaging barcode and coding operations? Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3. You can also email me at dholliday@idtechnology.com. We’ll be sure to get you in touch with an expert, right in your area!

Local save:http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/FJ-WP.jpg

Image process :: Saving local image

grab remote location : http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/FJ-WP.jpg

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Replacing images : - ON

Product Handling Considerations for Barcoding on Shipping CasesUsing inkjet printers to add variable information to shipping cases, is increasing in popularity. Using this technique can dramatically reduce the number of pre-printed items that need to be managed and fit into company efforts to increase digitalization and move to a lean workflow.

Here at ID Technology, we have a lot of experience when it comes to installing inkjet systems for printing barcodes, text and graphics onto corrugated cases. We are a founding distributor of the FoxJet ProSeries system and have won the prestigious Regency Award for top FoxJet distributor for 14 consecutive years.

If there is one thing we’ve learned over this time, it’s that having good product handling is as important as having good printing equipment for getting the high-quality, compliant GS1 barcodes that customers demand. If the boxes are not presented consistently and accurately to the printheads, this will show in poor print quality and in particular will not allow high-quality barcodes to be printed.

To help educate users on best practices for product handling, our friends at FoxJet recently produced a detailed whitepaper on this topic that goes over many of the issues that are important to ensure great quality printing every time.

FoxJet ProSeries Printers

The whitepaper the transition from the case taper or sealer to the conveyor where the barcode printers are installed as being an area of crucial importance. Because space is often limited on packaging lines, the printheads often have to be installed very close to the exit of the case sealer. Some important factors are:

Carton Control – Proximity to the Printhead

It is important that after leaving the case sealer, the boxes are correctly presented the correct distance from the printheads. The drops of ink that are fired from the printheads can only travel a short distance while maintaining accuracy. If the box is too far away, print quality will decline and if so close it hits the printhead, damage might occur.

Be sure to control the boxes gently so that the boxes are undamaged as they pass through your packaging processes.

It’s best to use guide rails to accurately control the position of the box and even better use in conjunction with FoxJet’s retracting printhead brackets. This bracket uses a roller allow the printhead to be the correct distance from the box every time.

Product/Conveyor Speed

Ensure that boxes leaving your case sealer are traveling at a speed that is within the limits of your inkjet printer. Our FoxJet ProSeries printheads are able to print high-quality text, barcodes and images at up to 300ft per minute, which is enough for all but the fastest production lines.

Angel Hair

No, we are not talking pasta here! Some case sealing machines use hot melt adhesive to hold the flaps on the boxes closed. At times the adhesive applicators can leave a stringy residue behind that can get stuck to the printheads and block the tiny nozzles. Dust from the corrugated boxes can be bad too – be sure to regularly clean your packaging equipment and the printheads.

Vibrations

Good quality printing depends on the boxes being transferred smoothly past the printheads. Make sure your conveyor belt runs smoothly and that you are not dropping boxes onto the conveyor where the printheads are mounted. We’ve seen this happen and the results are not always pretty!

Best Practice of All

The best way to get the best labeling or coding for your shipping cases is to connect with your local ID Technology representative. With many years of experience, combined with the case packing, sealing and product handling of ProMach, we are able to help you determine the best solution for all your case coding or labeling needs.

How can ID Technology and ProMach help you meet your objectives for your packaging barcode and coding operations? Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3. You can also email me at dholliday@idtechnology.com. We’ll be sure to get you in touch with an expert, right in your area!

Local save:http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/proseries.jpg

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Image exists, checking for same file size

Replacing images : - ON

Product Handling Considerations for Barcoding on Shipping CasesUsing inkjet printers to add variable information to shipping cases, is increasing in popularity. Using this technique can dramatically reduce the number of pre-printed items that need to be managed and fit into company efforts to increase digitalization and move to a lean workflow.

Here at ID Technology, we have a lot of experience when it comes to installing inkjet systems for printing barcodes, text and graphics onto corrugated cases. We are a founding distributor of the Product Handling Considerations for Barcoding on Shipping CasesFoxJet ProSeries system and have won the prestigious Regency Award for top FoxJet distributor for 14 consecutive years.

If there is one thing we’ve learned over this time, it’s that having good product handling is as important as having good printing equipment for getting the high-quality, compliant GS1 barcodes that customers demand. If the boxes are not presented consistently and accurately to the printheads, this will show in poor print quality and in particular will not allow high-quality barcodes to be printed.

To help educate users on best practices for product handling, our friends at FoxJet recently produced a detailed whitepaper on this topic that goes over many of the issues that are important to ensure great quality printing every time.

FoxJet ProSeries Printers

The whitepaper the transition from the case taper or sealer to the conveyor where the barcode printers are installed as being an area of crucial importance. Because space is often limited on packaging lines, the printheads often have to be installed very close to the exit of the case sealer. Some important factors are:

Carton Control – Proximity to the Printhead

It is important that after leaving the case sealer, the boxes are correctly presented the correct distance from the printheads. The drops of ink that are fired from the printheads can only travel a short distance while maintaining accuracy. If the box is too far away, print quality will decline and if so close it hits the printhead, damage might occur.

Be sure to control the boxes gently so that the boxes are undamaged as they pass through your packaging processes.

It’s best to use guide rails to accurately control the position of the box and even better use in conjunction with FoxJet’s retracting printhead brackets. This bracket uses a roller allow the printhead to be the correct distance from the box every time.

Product/Conveyor Speed

Ensure that boxes leaving your case sealer are traveling at a speed that is within the limits of your inkjet printer. Our FoxJet ProSeries printheads are able to print high-quality text, barcodes and images at up to 300ft per minute, which is enough for all but the fastest production lines.

Angel Hair

No, we are not talking pasta here! Some case sealing machines use hot melt adhesive to hold the flaps on the boxes closed. At times the adhesive applicators can leave a stringy residue behind that can get stuck to the printheads and block the tiny nozzles. Dust from the corrugated boxes can be bad too – be sure to regularly clean your packaging equipment and the printheads.

Vibrations

Good quality printing depends on the boxes being transferred smoothly past the printheads. Make sure your conveyor belt runs smoothly and that you are not dropping boxes onto the conveyor where the printheads are mounted. We’ve seen this happen and the results are not always pretty!

Best Practice of All

The best way to get the best labeling or coding for your shipping cases is to connect with your local ID Technology representative. With many years of experience, combined with the case packing, sealing and product handling of ProMach, we are able to help you determine the best solution for all your case coding or labeling needs.

How can ID Technology and ProMach help you meet your objectives for your packaging barcode and coding operations? Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3. You can also email me at dholliday@idtechnology.com. We’ll be sure to get you in touch with an expert, right in your area!

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Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :Product Handling Considerations for Barcoding on Shipping Cases

Array ( [post_title] => Product Handling Considerations for Barcoding on Shipping Cases [post_content] =>

Product Handling Considerations for Barcoding on Shipping CasesUsing inkjet printers to add variable information to shipping cases, is increasing in popularity. Using this technique can dramatically reduce the number of pre-printed items that need to be managed and fit into company efforts to increase digitalization and move to a lean workflow.

Here at ID Technology, we have a lot of experience when it comes to installing inkjet systems for printing barcodes, text and graphics onto corrugated cases. We are a founding distributor of the Product Handling Considerations for Barcoding on Shipping CasesFoxJet ProSeries system and have won the prestigious Regency Award for top FoxJet distributor for 14 consecutive years.

If there is one thing we’ve learned over this time, it’s that having good product handling is as important as having good printing equipment for getting the high-quality, compliant GS1 barcodes that customers demand. If the boxes are not presented consistently and accurately to the printheads, this will show in poor print quality and in particular will not allow high-quality barcodes to be printed.

To help educate users on best practices for product handling, our friends at FoxJet recently produced a detailed whitepaper on this topic that goes over many of the issues that are important to ensure great quality printing every time.

Product Handling Considerations for Barcoding on Shipping Cases

FoxJet ProSeries Printers

The whitepaper the transition from the case taper or sealer to the conveyor where the barcode printers are installed as being an area of crucial importance. Because space is often limited on packaging lines, the printheads often have to be installed very close to the exit of the case sealer. Some important factors are:

Carton Control – Proximity to the Printhead

It is important that after leaving the case sealer, the boxes are correctly presented the correct distance from the printheads. The drops of ink that are fired from the printheads can only travel a short distance while maintaining accuracy. If the box is too far away, print quality will decline and if so close it hits the printhead, damage might occur.

Be sure to control the boxes gently so that the boxes are undamaged as they pass through your packaging processes.

It’s best to use guide rails to accurately control the position of the box and even better use in conjunction with FoxJet’s retracting printhead brackets. This bracket uses a roller allow the printhead to be the correct distance from the box every time.

Product/Conveyor Speed

Ensure that boxes leaving your case sealer are traveling at a speed that is within the limits of your inkjet printer. Our FoxJet ProSeries printheads are able to print high-quality text, barcodes and images at up to 300ft per minute, which is enough for all but the fastest production lines.

Angel Hair

No, we are not talking pasta here! Some case sealing machines use hot melt adhesive to hold the flaps on the boxes closed. At times the adhesive applicators can leave a stringy residue behind that can get stuck to the printheads and block the tiny nozzles. Dust from the corrugated boxes can be bad too – be sure to regularly clean your packaging equipment and the printheads.

Vibrations

Good quality printing depends on the boxes being transferred smoothly past the printheads. Make sure your conveyor belt runs smoothly and that you are not dropping boxes onto the conveyor where the printheads are mounted. We’ve seen this happen and the results are not always pretty!

Best Practice of All

The best way to get the best labeling or coding for your shipping cases is to connect with your local ID Technology representative. With many years of experience, combined with the case packing, sealing and product handling of ProMach, we are able to help you determine the best solution for all your case coding or labeling needs.

How can ID Technology and ProMach help you meet your objectives for your packaging barcode and coding operations? Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3. You can also email me at dholliday@idtechnology.com. We’ll be sure to get you in touch with an expert, right in your area!

[post_excerpt] => Using inkjet printers to add variable information to shipping cases, is increasing in popularity. Using this technique can dramatically reduce the number of pre-printed items that need to be managed and fit into company efforts to increase digitalization and move to a lean workflow. Here at ID Technology, we have a lot of experience when […] [post_date_gmt] => 2019-06-18 21:03:04 [post_date] => 2019-06-18 21:03:04 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-06-18 21:03:04 [post_modified] => 2019-06-18 21:03:04 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => http://www.labelingnews.com/?p=5937 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Labeling News [syndication_source_uri] => http://www.labelingnews.com [syndication_source_id] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed_id] => 12 [syndication_permalink] => http://www.labelingnews.com/2019/06/product-handling-considerations-for-barcoding-on-shipping-cases/ [syndication_item_hash] => 380c6e3d4f6ebf63ea44ce5e8d7bf988 [faf_featured_image] => 0 [faf_process_image] => 0,0,0 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 1625 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )


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FAF deciding on filters on post to be syndicated:

Ambassador Andrew Young and the Making of Modern Atlanta | Georgia-Pacific

Array ( [post_title] => Ambassador Andrew Young and the Making of Modern Atlanta | Georgia-Pacific [post_content] =>

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Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :Ambassador Andrew Young and the Making of Modern Atlanta | Georgia-Pacific

Array ( [post_title] => Ambassador Andrew Young and the Making of Modern Atlanta | Georgia-Pacific [post_content] =>

[post_date_gmt] => 2020-02-19 18:59:39 [post_date] => 2020-02-19 18:59:39 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-02-19 18:59:39 [post_modified] => 2020-02-19 18:59:39 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2020/02/19/ambassador-andrew-young-and-the-making-of-modern-atlanta-georgia-pacific/ [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Uncategorized – Converting Guide [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.convertingguide.com [syndication_source_id] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed_id] => 19 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2020/02/19/ambassador-andrew-young-and-the-making-of-modern-atlanta-georgia-pacific/ [syndication_item_hash] => 68911bdee851abbfcd8e18ddda6837a9 [faf_process_image] => ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 10054 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) [post_excerpt] => )

FAF deciding on filters on post to be syndicated:

Dusenbery 835 customer trial run

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Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :Dusenbery 835 customer trial run

Array ( [post_title] => Dusenbery 835 customer trial run [post_content] =>

[post_date_gmt] => 2020-02-19 18:40:53 [post_date] => 2020-02-19 18:40:53 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-02-19 18:40:53 [post_modified] => 2020-02-19 18:40:53 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2020/02/19/dusenbery-835-customer-trial-run/ [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Uncategorized – Converting Guide [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.convertingguide.com [syndication_source_id] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed_id] => 19 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2020/02/19/dusenbery-835-customer-trial-run/ [syndication_item_hash] => 198b27bf531362524951f5510076782a [faf_process_image] => ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 10054 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) [post_excerpt] => )

FAF deciding on filters on post to be syndicated:

ACCO Brands Corporation Declares Quarterly Dividend

Array ( [post_title] => ACCO Brands Corporation Declares Quarterly Dividend [post_content] =>

LAKE ZURICH, Ill. –(BUSINESS WIRE)–Feb. 18, 2020– ACCO Brands Corporation (NYSE: ACCO) today announced that its board of directors has declared a quarterly cash dividend of $0.065 per share. The dividend will be paid on March 26, 2020 , to stockholders of record as of the close of business on

[post_excerpt] => LAKE ZURICH, Ill. –(BUSINESS WIRE)–Feb. 18, 2020– ACCO Brands Corporation (NYSE: ACCO) today announced that its board of directors has declared a quarterly cash dividend of $0.065 per share. The dividend will be paid on March 26, 2020... [post_date_gmt] => 2020-02-18 21:15:28 [post_date] => 2020-02-18 21:15:28 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-02-18 21:15:28 [post_modified] => 2020-02-18 21:15:28 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2020/02/18/acco-brands-corporation-declares-quarterly-dividend-9/ [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Uncategorized – Converting Guide [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.convertingguide.com [syndication_source_id] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed_id] => 19 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2020/02/18/acco-brands-corporation-declares-quarterly-dividend-9/ [syndication_item_hash] => 46e75f38b8574167db9ba7f01e1dbb32 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 10054 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

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Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :ACCO Brands Corporation Declares Quarterly Dividend

Array ( [post_title] => ACCO Brands Corporation Declares Quarterly Dividend [post_content] =>

LAKE ZURICH, Ill. –(BUSINESS WIRE)–Feb. 18, 2020– ACCO Brands Corporation (NYSE: ACCO) today announced that its board of directors has declared a quarterly cash dividend of $0.065 per share. The dividend will be paid on March 26, 2020 , to stockholders of record as of the close of business on

[post_excerpt] => LAKE ZURICH, Ill. –(BUSINESS WIRE)–Feb. 18, 2020– ACCO Brands Corporation (NYSE: ACCO) today announced that its board of directors has declared a quarterly cash dividend of $0.065 per share. The dividend will be paid on March 26, 2020... [post_date_gmt] => 2020-02-18 21:15:28 [post_date] => 2020-02-18 21:15:28 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-02-18 21:15:28 [post_modified] => 2020-02-18 21:15:28 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2020/02/18/acco-brands-corporation-declares-quarterly-dividend-9/ [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Uncategorized – Converting Guide [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.convertingguide.com [syndication_source_id] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed_id] => 19 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2020/02/18/acco-brands-corporation-declares-quarterly-dividend-9/ [syndication_item_hash] => 46e75f38b8574167db9ba7f01e1dbb32 [faf_process_image] => ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 10054 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

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Automatic Labeling System – APS 228 – Accutek Packaging Equipment Company, Inc.

Array ( [post_title] => Automatic Labeling System – APS 228 – Accutek Packaging Equipment Company, Inc. [post_content] =>

[post_date_gmt] => 2020-02-17 17:46:03 [post_date] => 2020-02-17 17:46:03 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-02-17 17:46:03 [post_modified] => 2020-02-17 17:46:03 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2020/02/17/automatic-labeling-system-aps-228-accutek-packaging-equipment-company-inc/ [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Uncategorized – Converting Guide [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.convertingguide.com [syndication_source_id] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed_id] => 19 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2020/02/17/automatic-labeling-system-aps-228-accutek-packaging-equipment-company-inc/ [syndication_item_hash] => 585f5c7c8a82dfc5089f02435108558e ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 10054 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

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Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :Automatic Labeling System – APS 228 – Accutek Packaging Equipment Company, Inc.

Array ( [post_title] => Automatic Labeling System – APS 228 – Accutek Packaging Equipment Company, Inc. [post_content] =>

[post_date_gmt] => 2020-02-17 17:46:03 [post_date] => 2020-02-17 17:46:03 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-02-17 17:46:03 [post_modified] => 2020-02-17 17:46:03 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2020/02/17/automatic-labeling-system-aps-228-accutek-packaging-equipment-company-inc/ [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Uncategorized – Converting Guide [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.convertingguide.com [syndication_source_id] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed_id] => 19 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2020/02/17/automatic-labeling-system-aps-228-accutek-packaging-equipment-company-inc/ [syndication_item_hash] => 585f5c7c8a82dfc5089f02435108558e [faf_process_image] => ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 10054 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) [post_excerpt] => )

FAF deciding on filters on post to be syndicated:

Gallus Labelfire – Explained in detail

Array ( [post_title] => Gallus Labelfire – Explained in detail [post_content] =>

[post_date_gmt] => 2020-02-17 09:29:14 [post_date] => 2020-02-17 09:29:14 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-02-17 09:29:14 [post_modified] => 2020-02-17 09:29:14 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2020/02/17/gallus-labelfire-explained-in-detail/ [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Uncategorized – Converting Guide [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.convertingguide.com [syndication_source_id] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed_id] => 19 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2020/02/17/gallus-labelfire-explained-in-detail/ [syndication_item_hash] => d9f6ef71f0b12d314eaf3f1dcaa9262e ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 10054 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

Doing filter:faf_image_filter

Execute image filter

Image process

No image matches

Array ( )

Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Uncategorized – Converting Guide [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.convertingguide.com [syndication_source_id] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed_id] => 19 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2020/02/17/gallus-labelfire-explained-in-detail/ [syndication_item_hash] => d9f6ef71f0b12d314eaf3f1dcaa9262e )

Execute : Enclosure images

Enclosure save:

Array ( [0] => )

No match on

Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :Gallus Labelfire – Explained in detail

Array ( [post_title] => Gallus Labelfire – Explained in detail [post_content] =>

[post_date_gmt] => 2020-02-17 09:29:14 [post_date] => 2020-02-17 09:29:14 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-02-17 09:29:14 [post_modified] => 2020-02-17 09:29:14 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2020/02/17/gallus-labelfire-explained-in-detail/ [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Uncategorized – Converting Guide [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.convertingguide.com [syndication_source_id] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed_id] => 19 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2020/02/17/gallus-labelfire-explained-in-detail/ [syndication_item_hash] => d9f6ef71f0b12d314eaf3f1dcaa9262e [faf_process_image] => ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 10054 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) [post_excerpt] => )

FAF deciding on filters on post to be syndicated:

Automatic high speed folding mask machine

Array ( [post_title] => Automatic high speed folding mask machine [post_content] =>

[post_date_gmt] => 2020-02-16 03:29:57 [post_date] => 2020-02-16 03:29:57 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-02-16 03:29:57 [post_modified] => 2020-02-16 03:29:57 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2020/02/16/automatic-high-speed-folding-mask-machine/ [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Uncategorized – Converting Guide [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.convertingguide.com [syndication_source_id] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed_id] => 19 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2020/02/16/automatic-high-speed-folding-mask-machine/ [syndication_item_hash] => 16870049a77edf5a2263f008b217a2d5 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 10054 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

Doing filter:faf_image_filter

Execute image filter

Image process

No image matches

Array ( )

Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Uncategorized – Converting Guide [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.convertingguide.com [syndication_source_id] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed_id] => 19 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2020/02/16/automatic-high-speed-folding-mask-machine/ [syndication_item_hash] => 16870049a77edf5a2263f008b217a2d5 )

Execute : Enclosure images

Enclosure save:

Array ( [0] => )

No match on

Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :Automatic high speed folding mask machine

Array ( [post_title] => Automatic high speed folding mask machine [post_content] =>

[post_date_gmt] => 2020-02-16 03:29:57 [post_date] => 2020-02-16 03:29:57 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-02-16 03:29:57 [post_modified] => 2020-02-16 03:29:57 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2020/02/16/automatic-high-speed-folding-mask-machine/ [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Uncategorized – Converting Guide [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.convertingguide.com [syndication_source_id] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed_id] => 19 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2020/02/16/automatic-high-speed-folding-mask-machine/ [syndication_item_hash] => 16870049a77edf5a2263f008b217a2d5 [faf_process_image] => ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 10054 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) [post_excerpt] => )

FAF deciding on filters on post to be syndicated:

Specialized Marking Systems Increases Capacity with Digital Pro Upgrade

Array ( [post_title] => Specialized Marking Systems Increases Capacity with Digital Pro Upgrade [post_content] =>

Specialized Marking Systems, an Ontario based converter has upgraded its Digital One to the new Mark Andy Digital Pro engine to increase capacity and expand its overall digital label business. Over a year post-installation of the Digital One, the choice to upgrade to the new engine was made with the success of the Digital Pro predecessor in mind. 

Read more: Specialized Marking Systems Increases Capacity with Digital Pro Upgrade

[post_excerpt] => Specialized Marking Systems, an Ontario based converter has upgraded its Digital One to the new Mark Andy Digital Pro engine to increase capacity and expand its overall digital label business. Over a year post-installation of the Digital One, the choice to upgrade to the new engine was made with the success of the Digital Pro […] [post_date_gmt] => 2020-02-14 15:23:52 [post_date] => 2020-02-14 15:23:52 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-02-14 15:23:52 [post_modified] => 2020-02-14 15:23:52 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2020/02/14/specialized-marking-systems-increases-capacity-with-digital-pro-upgrade/ [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Uncategorized – Converting Guide [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.convertingguide.com [syndication_source_id] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed_id] => 19 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2020/02/14/specialized-marking-systems-increases-capacity-with-digital-pro-upgrade/ [syndication_item_hash] => d2ea73441e00042bf432890b05c6a753 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 10054 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

Doing filter:faf_image_filter

Execute image filter

Image process

Local save:https://track.hubspot.com/__ptq.gif?a=2656216&k=14&r=http%3A%2F%2Fblog.markandy.com%2Fdigital-one-engine-upgrade-customer-success&bu=http%253A%252F%252Fblog.markandy.com&bvt=rss

Image process :: Saving local image

grab remote location : https://track.hubspot.com/__ptq.gif?a=2656216&k=14&r=http%3A%2F%2Fblog.markandy.com%2Fdigital-one-engine-upgrade-customer-success&bu=http%253A%252F%252Fblog.markandy.com&bvt=rss

Image exists, checking for same file size

Replacing images : - ON

Specialized Marking Systems, an Ontario based converter has upgraded its Digital One to the new Mark Andy Digital Pro engine to increase capacity and expand its overall digital label business. Over a year post-installation of the Digital One, the choice to upgrade to the new engine was made with the success of the Digital Pro predecessor in mind. 

Read more: Specialized Marking Systems Increases Capacity with Digital Pro Upgrade

Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Uncategorized – Converting Guide [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.convertingguide.com [syndication_source_id] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed_id] => 19 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2020/02/14/specialized-marking-systems-increases-capacity-with-digital-pro-upgrade/ [syndication_item_hash] => d2ea73441e00042bf432890b05c6a753 )

Execute : Enclosure images

Enclosure save:

Array ( [0] => )

No match on

Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :Specialized Marking Systems Increases Capacity with Digital Pro Upgrade

Array ( [post_title] => Specialized Marking Systems Increases Capacity with Digital Pro Upgrade [post_content] =>

Specialized Marking Systems, an Ontario based converter has upgraded its Digital One to the new Mark Andy Digital Pro engine to increase capacity and expand its overall digital label business. Over a year post-installation of the Digital One, the choice to upgrade to the new engine was made with the success of the Digital Pro predecessor in mind. 

Specialized Marking Systems Increases Capacity with Digital Pro Upgrade

Read more: Specialized Marking Systems Increases Capacity with Digital Pro Upgrade

[post_excerpt] => Specialized Marking Systems, an Ontario based converter has upgraded its Digital One to the new Mark Andy Digital Pro engine to increase capacity and expand its overall digital label business. Over a year post-installation of the Digital One, the choice to upgrade to the new engine was made with the success of the Digital Pro […] [post_date_gmt] => 2020-02-14 15:23:52 [post_date] => 2020-02-14 15:23:52 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-02-14 15:23:52 [post_modified] => 2020-02-14 15:23:52 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2020/02/14/specialized-marking-systems-increases-capacity-with-digital-pro-upgrade/ [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Uncategorized – Converting Guide [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.convertingguide.com [syndication_source_id] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed_id] => 19 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2020/02/14/specialized-marking-systems-increases-capacity-with-digital-pro-upgrade/ [syndication_item_hash] => d2ea73441e00042bf432890b05c6a753 [faf_featured_image] => 0 [faf_process_image] => 0 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 10054 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

FAF deciding on filters on post to be syndicated:

Gallus Labelfire – Explained in short

Array ( [post_title] => Gallus Labelfire – Explained in short [post_content] =>

[post_date_gmt] => 2020-02-14 14:59:20 [post_date] => 2020-02-14 14:59:20 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-02-14 14:59:20 [post_modified] => 2020-02-14 14:59:20 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2020/02/14/gallus-labelfire-explained-in-short/ [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Uncategorized – Converting Guide [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.convertingguide.com [syndication_source_id] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed_id] => 19 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2020/02/14/gallus-labelfire-explained-in-short/ [syndication_item_hash] => 7b3bf055b6b23ba8adb533b62598ba98 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 10054 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

Doing filter:faf_image_filter

Execute image filter

Image process

No image matches

Array ( )

Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Uncategorized – Converting Guide [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.convertingguide.com [syndication_source_id] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed_id] => 19 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2020/02/14/gallus-labelfire-explained-in-short/ [syndication_item_hash] => 7b3bf055b6b23ba8adb533b62598ba98 )

Execute : Enclosure images

Enclosure save:

Array ( [0] => )

No match on

Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :Gallus Labelfire – Explained in short

Array ( [post_title] => Gallus Labelfire – Explained in short [post_content] =>

[post_date_gmt] => 2020-02-14 14:59:20 [post_date] => 2020-02-14 14:59:20 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-02-14 14:59:20 [post_modified] => 2020-02-14 14:59:20 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2020/02/14/gallus-labelfire-explained-in-short/ [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Uncategorized – Converting Guide [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.convertingguide.com [syndication_source_id] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed_id] => 19 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2020/02/14/gallus-labelfire-explained-in-short/ [syndication_item_hash] => 7b3bf055b6b23ba8adb533b62598ba98 [faf_process_image] => ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 10054 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) [post_excerpt] => )

FAF deciding on filters on post to be syndicated:

Disposable Surgical Face Mask; Medical Mask making machine, production line

Array ( [post_title] => Disposable Surgical Face Mask; Medical Mask making machine, production line [post_content] =>

[post_date_gmt] => 2020-02-14 09:14:30 [post_date] => 2020-02-14 09:14:30 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-02-14 09:14:30 [post_modified] => 2020-02-14 09:14:30 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2020/02/14/disposable-surgical-face-mask-medical-mask-making-machine-production-line/ [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Uncategorized – Converting Guide [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.convertingguide.com [syndication_source_id] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed_id] => 19 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2020/02/14/disposable-surgical-face-mask-medical-mask-making-machine-production-line/ [syndication_item_hash] => de0d57c98f91cff6aabe076f21600ef3 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 10054 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

Doing filter:faf_image_filter

Execute image filter

Image process

No image matches

Array ( )

Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Uncategorized – Converting Guide [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.convertingguide.com [syndication_source_id] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed_id] => 19 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2020/02/14/disposable-surgical-face-mask-medical-mask-making-machine-production-line/ [syndication_item_hash] => de0d57c98f91cff6aabe076f21600ef3 )

Execute : Enclosure images

Enclosure save:

Array ( [0] => )

No match on

Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :Disposable Surgical Face Mask; Medical Mask making machine, production line

Array ( [post_title] => Disposable Surgical Face Mask; Medical Mask making machine, production line [post_content] =>

[post_date_gmt] => 2020-02-14 09:14:30 [post_date] => 2020-02-14 09:14:30 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-02-14 09:14:30 [post_modified] => 2020-02-14 09:14:30 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2020/02/14/disposable-surgical-face-mask-medical-mask-making-machine-production-line/ [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Uncategorized – Converting Guide [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.convertingguide.com [syndication_source_id] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed_id] => 19 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2020/02/14/disposable-surgical-face-mask-medical-mask-making-machine-production-line/ [syndication_item_hash] => de0d57c98f91cff6aabe076f21600ef3 [faf_process_image] => ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 10054 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) [post_excerpt] => )

FAF deciding on filters on post to be syndicated:

Bucket Automatic Heat Transfer Machine

Array ( [post_title] => Bucket Automatic Heat Transfer Machine [post_content] =>

[post_date_gmt] => 2020-02-14 07:44:28 [post_date] => 2020-02-14 07:44:28 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-02-14 07:44:28 [post_modified] => 2020-02-14 07:44:28 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2020/02/14/bucket-automatic-heat-transfer-machine/ [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Uncategorized – Converting Guide [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.convertingguide.com [syndication_source_id] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed_id] => 19 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2020/02/14/bucket-automatic-heat-transfer-machine/ [syndication_item_hash] => 6eab4ca8c52257e246e8ee583b1df4d5 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 10054 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

Doing filter:faf_image_filter

Execute image filter

Image process

No image matches

Array ( )

Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Uncategorized – Converting Guide [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.convertingguide.com [syndication_source_id] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed_id] => 19 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2020/02/14/bucket-automatic-heat-transfer-machine/ [syndication_item_hash] => 6eab4ca8c52257e246e8ee583b1df4d5 )

Execute : Enclosure images

Enclosure save:

Array ( [0] => )

No match on

Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :Bucket Automatic Heat Transfer Machine

Array ( [post_title] => Bucket Automatic Heat Transfer Machine [post_content] =>

[post_date_gmt] => 2020-02-14 07:44:28 [post_date] => 2020-02-14 07:44:28 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-02-14 07:44:28 [post_modified] => 2020-02-14 07:44:28 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2020/02/14/bucket-automatic-heat-transfer-machine/ [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Uncategorized – Converting Guide [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.convertingguide.com [syndication_source_id] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed] => http://convertingguide.com/?feed=rss2&cat=1 [syndication_feed_id] => 19 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.convertingguide.com/2020/02/14/bucket-automatic-heat-transfer-machine/ [syndication_item_hash] => 6eab4ca8c52257e246e8ee583b1df4d5 [faf_process_image] => ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 10054 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) [post_excerpt] => )


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