FAF deciding on filters on post to be syndicated:

Product Coding for Protein Producers

Array ( [post_title] => Product Coding for Protein Producers [post_content] =>

Regardless of package type, companies that produce meat or poultry products need to add variable information to the package. This includes date and lot codes, establishment codes, regulatory agency logos, and increasingly barcodes.

In many industries, this is quite straightforward, but for protein companies, there is the added complication of the environment in which coding and packaging equipment has to operate. Cold and wet conditions are the norm and any equipment brought into the plants needs to be able to handle this as well as washdown situations.

Traditionally continuous inkjet (CIJ) printers have been used for printing variable information onto meat and poultry packaging. These printers can usually handle the harsh conditions found on the packaging lines and also produce the print quality that is good enough for the applications. Thermal inkjet (TIJ) printers have not been used in the past due to the inks being unsuitable for use on the films used for the packaging.

inkjet printing for protein companies

Over the last few years, however, there have been great advances in the chemistry of inks for TIJ printing and today, this technology is proving to be very successful at printing onto the non-porous substrates used for protein packaging.

The ink cartridges used in thermal inkjet printers ensure that there is no need to have to deal with the MEK and other solvents used in other print technologies, such as CIJ. There is no need to deal with disposing of partially used ink or additive bottles.

With no cleaning cycle needed at startup or shutdown, a thermal inkjet printer is always ready to work.

The thermal inkjet coders provided by ProMach brands, Code Tech & ID Technology, are designed to be able to get the job done in these areas. They bring all the advantages of the thermal inkjet system but include models that are available in IP65 versions, perfect for producing excellent code quality every time, regardless of the environment.

 

Reduce Maintenance & Downtime

A thermal impact printer uses familiar HP type ink cartridges. This means that every time you change the cartridge, you effectively get a new printer.

As a bonus, should you need to change the color of your print, this is accomplished by simply replacing the ink cartridge with one of the required color.

Our TIJ printers come in versions that are built to IP65 environmental protection. This means that regardless of how dirty or wet the packaging environment, the printers will operate happily.

Exceptional Print Quality

With print resolutions of up to 600×600 DPI, thermal inkjet produces perfect prints every time, even when printing very small fonts or high-density barcodes.

Inks are available that are fast drying and durable to suit just about every packaging material.

Quick and Simple Installation and Integration

Thermal inkjet printers from ID Technology and Code Tech have a small footprint, making them easy to install in your parent packaging machine, even when multiple heads are needed.

Combined with the web handling and printer traversing expertise of the Greydon brand, printers from ProMach Labeling & Coding can be integrated with every type of flexible packaging machine.

Is TIJ Always the Best Technology to Use?

No, not always.

Thermal inkjet brings some important advantages, but there are times where an alternative technology such as CIJ printing, thermal transfer, laser or ink stamping might make sense. We happen to sell a complete range of coding technologies so we can work with you to help decide which is best for your unique needs.

Want to Get Started?

How can you start improving your own packaging coding? Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3. You can also email me at dholliday@idtechnology.com We’ll get you in touch with one of our local experts right away.

[post_excerpt] => Regardless of package type, companies that produce meat or poultry products need to add variable information to the package. This includes date and lot codes, establishment codes, regulatory agency logos, and increasingly barcodes. In many industries, this is quite straightforward, but for protein companies, there is the added complication of the environment in which coding […] [post_date_gmt] => 2019-08-07 14:47:49 [post_date] => 2019-08-07 14:47:49 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-08-07 14:47:49 [post_modified] => 2019-08-07 14:47:49 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => http://www.labelingnews.com/?p=5958 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Labeling News [syndication_source_uri] => http://www.labelingnews.com [syndication_source_id] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed_id] => 12 [syndication_permalink] => http://www.labelingnews.com/2019/08/product-coding-for-protein-producers/ [syndication_item_hash] => bf79e38cb1b9f7707482459ba38d1477 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 1625 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

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Local save:http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/washdown-codetech.jpg

Image process :: Saving local image

grab remote location : http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/washdown-codetech.jpg

Image exists, checking for same file size

Replacing images : inkjet printing for protein companies - inkjet printing for protein companies ON

Regardless of package type, companies that produce meat or poultry products need to add variable information to the package. This includes date and lot codes, establishment codes, regulatory agency logos, and increasingly barcodes.

In many industries, this is quite straightforward, but for protein companies, there is the added complication of the environment in which coding and packaging equipment has to operate. Cold and wet conditions are the norm and any equipment brought into the plants needs to be able to handle this as well as washdown situations.

Traditionally continuous inkjet (CIJ) printers have been used for printing variable information onto meat and poultry packaging. These printers can usually handle the harsh conditions found on the packaging lines and also produce the print quality that is good enough for the applications. Thermal inkjet (TIJ) printers have not been used in the past due to the inks being unsuitable for use on the films used for the packaging.

inkjet printing for protein companies

Over the last few years, however, there have been great advances in the chemistry of inks for TIJ printing and today, this technology is proving to be very successful at printing onto the non-porous substrates used for protein packaging.

The ink cartridges used in thermal inkjet printers ensure that there is no need to have to deal with the MEK and other solvents used in other print technologies, such as CIJ. There is no need to deal with disposing of partially used ink or additive bottles.

With no cleaning cycle needed at startup or shutdown, a thermal inkjet printer is always ready to work.

The thermal inkjet coders provided by ProMach brands, Code Tech & ID Technology, are designed to be able to get the job done in these areas. They bring all the advantages of the thermal inkjet system but include models that are available in IP65 versions, perfect for producing excellent code quality every time, regardless of the environment.

 

Reduce Maintenance & Downtime

A thermal impact printer uses familiar HP type ink cartridges. This means that every time you change the cartridge, you effectively get a new printer.

As a bonus, should you need to change the color of your print, this is accomplished by simply replacing the ink cartridge with one of the required color.

Our TIJ printers come in versions that are built to IP65 environmental protection. This means that regardless of how dirty or wet the packaging environment, the printers will operate happily.

Exceptional Print Quality

With print resolutions of up to 600×600 DPI, thermal inkjet produces perfect prints every time, even when printing very small fonts or high-density barcodes.

Inks are available that are fast drying and durable to suit just about every packaging material.

Quick and Simple Installation and Integration

Thermal inkjet printers from ID Technology and Code Tech have a small footprint, making them easy to install in your parent packaging machine, even when multiple heads are needed.

Combined with the web handling and printer traversing expertise of the Greydon brand, printers from ProMach Labeling & Coding can be integrated with every type of flexible packaging machine.

Is TIJ Always the Best Technology to Use?

No, not always.

Thermal inkjet brings some important advantages, but there are times where an alternative technology such as CIJ printing, thermal transfer, laser or ink stamping might make sense. We happen to sell a complete range of coding technologies so we can work with you to help decide which is best for your unique needs.

Want to Get Started?

How can you start improving your own packaging coding? Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3. You can also email me at dholliday@idtechnology.com We’ll get you in touch with one of our local experts right away.

Local save:http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/tij-protein-samples.jpg

Image process :: Saving local image

grab remote location : http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/tij-protein-samples.jpg

Image exists, checking for same file size

Replacing images : - ON

Regardless of package type, companies that produce meat or poultry products need to add variable information to the package. This includes date and lot codes, establishment codes, regulatory agency logos, and increasingly barcodes.

In many industries, this is quite straightforward, but for protein companies, there is the added complication of the environment in which coding and packaging equipment has to operate. Cold and wet conditions are the norm and any equipment brought into the plants needs to be able to handle this as well as washdown situations.

Traditionally continuous inkjet (CIJ) printers have been used for printing variable information onto meat and poultry packaging. These printers can usually handle the harsh conditions found on the packaging lines and also produce the print quality that is good enough for the applications. Thermal inkjet (TIJ) printers have not been used in the past due to the inks being unsuitable for use on the films used for the packaging.

Product Coding for Protein Producers

Over the last few years, however, there have been great advances in the chemistry of inks for TIJ printing and today, this technology is proving to be very successful at printing onto the non-porous substrates used for protein packaging.

The ink cartridges used in thermal inkjet printers ensure that there is no need to have to deal with the MEK and other solvents used in other print technologies, such as CIJ. There is no need to deal with disposing of partially used ink or additive bottles.

With no cleaning cycle needed at startup or shutdown, a thermal inkjet printer is always ready to work.

The thermal inkjet coders provided by ProMach brands, Code Tech & ID Technology, are designed to be able to get the job done in these areas. They bring all the advantages of the thermal inkjet system but include models that are available in IP65 versions, perfect for producing excellent code quality every time, regardless of the environment.

 

Reduce Maintenance & Downtime

A thermal impact printer uses familiar HP type ink cartridges. This means that every time you change the cartridge, you effectively get a new printer.

As a bonus, should you need to change the color of your print, this is accomplished by simply replacing the ink cartridge with one of the required color.

Our TIJ printers come in versions that are built to IP65 environmental protection. This means that regardless of how dirty or wet the packaging environment, the printers will operate happily.

Exceptional Print Quality

With print resolutions of up to 600×600 DPI, thermal inkjet produces perfect prints every time, even when printing very small fonts or high-density barcodes.

Inks are available that are fast drying and durable to suit just about every packaging material.

Quick and Simple Installation and Integration

Thermal inkjet printers from ID Technology and Code Tech have a small footprint, making them easy to install in your parent packaging machine, even when multiple heads are needed.

Combined with the web handling and printer traversing expertise of the Greydon brand, printers from ProMach Labeling & Coding can be integrated with every type of flexible packaging machine.

Is TIJ Always the Best Technology to Use?

No, not always.

Thermal inkjet brings some important advantages, but there are times where an alternative technology such as CIJ printing, thermal transfer, laser or ink stamping might make sense. We happen to sell a complete range of coding technologies so we can work with you to help decide which is best for your unique needs.

Want to Get Started?

How can you start improving your own packaging coding? Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3. You can also email me at dholliday@idtechnology.com We’ll get you in touch with one of our local experts right away.

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Regardless of package type, companies that produce meat or poultry products need to add variable information to the package. This includes date and lot codes, establishment codes, regulatory agency logos, and increasingly barcodes.

In many industries, this is quite straightforward, but for protein companies, there is the added complication of the environment in which coding and packaging equipment has to operate. Cold and wet conditions are the norm and any equipment brought into the plants needs to be able to handle this as well as washdown situations.

Traditionally continuous inkjet (CIJ) printers have been used for printing variable information onto meat and poultry packaging. These printers can usually handle the harsh conditions found on the packaging lines and also produce the print quality that is good enough for the applications. Thermal inkjet (TIJ) printers have not been used in the past due to the inks being unsuitable for use on the films used for the packaging.

Product Coding for Protein Producers

Over the last few years, however, there have been great advances in the chemistry of inks for TIJ printing and today, this technology is proving to be very successful at printing onto the non-porous substrates used for protein packaging.Product Coding for Protein Producers

The ink cartridges used in thermal inkjet printers ensure that there is no need to have to deal with the MEK and other solvents used in other print technologies, such as CIJ. There is no need to deal with disposing of partially used ink or additive bottles.

With no cleaning cycle needed at startup or shutdown, a thermal inkjet printer is always ready to work.

The thermal inkjet coders provided by ProMach brands, Code Tech & ID Technology, are designed to be able to get the job done in these areas. They bring all the advantages of the thermal inkjet system but include models that are available in IP65 versions, perfect for producing excellent code quality every time, regardless of the environment.

 

Reduce Maintenance & Downtime

A thermal impact printer uses familiar HP type ink cartridges. This means that every time you change the cartridge, you effectively get a new printer.

As a bonus, should you need to change the color of your print, this is accomplished by simply replacing the ink cartridge with one of the required color.

Our TIJ printers come in versions that are built to IP65 environmental protection. This means that regardless of how dirty or wet the packaging environment, the printers will operate happily.

Exceptional Print Quality

With print resolutions of up to 600×600 DPI, thermal inkjet produces perfect prints every time, even when printing very small fonts or high-density barcodes.

Inks are available that are fast drying and durable to suit just about every packaging material.

Quick and Simple Installation and Integration

Thermal inkjet printers from ID Technology and Code Tech have a small footprint, making them easy to install in your parent packaging machine, even when multiple heads are needed.

Combined with the web handling and printer traversing expertise of the Greydon brand, printers from ProMach Labeling & Coding can be integrated with every type of flexible packaging machine.

Is TIJ Always the Best Technology to Use?

No, not always.

Thermal inkjet brings some important advantages, but there are times where an alternative technology such as CIJ printing, thermal transfer, laser or ink stamping might make sense. We happen to sell a complete range of coding technologies so we can work with you to help decide which is best for your unique needs.

Want to Get Started?

How can you start improving your own packaging coding? Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3. You can also email me at dholliday@idtechnology.com We’ll get you in touch with one of our local experts right away.

[post_excerpt] => Regardless of package type, companies that produce meat or poultry products need to add variable information to the package. This includes date and lot codes, establishment codes, regulatory agency logos, and increasingly barcodes. In many industries, this is quite straightforward, but for protein companies, there is the added complication of the environment in which coding […] [post_date_gmt] => 2019-08-07 14:47:49 [post_date] => 2019-08-07 14:47:49 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-08-07 14:47:49 [post_modified] => 2019-08-07 14:47:49 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => http://www.labelingnews.com/?p=5958 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Labeling News [syndication_source_uri] => http://www.labelingnews.com [syndication_source_id] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed_id] => 12 [syndication_permalink] => http://www.labelingnews.com/2019/08/product-coding-for-protein-producers/ [syndication_item_hash] => bf79e38cb1b9f7707482459ba38d1477 [faf_featured_image] => 0 [faf_process_image] => 0,0 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 1625 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

FAF deciding on filters on post to be syndicated:

Customer Engagement and More – GS1 Digital Link

Array ( [post_title] => Customer Engagement and More – GS1 Digital Link [post_content] =>

Using barcodes on packages for customer engagement? This idea is certainly not new – here is a link to a Packaging World article on this very topic from 2011.

The article specifically mentioned that QR codes would provide the ability to download coupons, enter contests, play games, and other fun activities – all powered by those little barcodes.

This all seemed quite exciting, but QR codes got old quickly and the concept seemed to fade away.

Fast forward to today and there is renewed interest in using packaging to actively engage with customers.

Listen to our GS1 Digital Link Podcast

Traditional ways to communicate to customers such as TV and print advertising are not performing as well as In the past.  These are also a one-way form of communication, yelling a message at consumers – no wonder they don’t work as well as in the past. In addition, engagement on a brand’s social media pages is in decline as well. What is a marketer to do?

As a result of all this, brand owners have a renewed interest trying to set up a direct connection to their customers based on the product packaging – the package is potentially the ultimate marketing tool.
Enter smart packaging – a means to allow brands to connect directly with their customers. Generally, a smart package will allow the customer to scan a barcode (yes, usually a QR Code) and be connected to an interactive website.

So QR codes are back – a lot of brands are using them – some quite creatively

Currently, there isn’t a standard to use QR codes  (or any type of barcode) for customer engagement so brands are tending to encode them in different ways – often just a URL, sometimes other data.
Of course, the package’s UPC  barcode still needs to be there so most items would have to have multiple barcodes – rather messy and takes up more space on the package.
The product UPC codes scanned at the point of sale haven’t really changed in the 45 years since the concept was introduced.

Wouldn’t it be great if, rather than have multiple barcodes on a package, a single one could contain the UPC data, weblink for customer engagement? Maybe we can!

Last year GS1 our favorite standards organization came out with a new concept: GS1 Digital Link.

While the name might not be too exciting, Digital Link has the potential to revolutionize how barcoding is used, to add true customer engagement and to (yes really) provide item-level serialization and traceability.
For primary packaging (what we would buy in a store), GS1’s barcoding is built around the concept of the Global Trade Item Number – GTIN. This is what is encoded in the common UPC barcode that is scanned at the checkout.
The GTIN in the item barcode basically consists of a company prefix and an SKU or stock keeping unit number. The GTIN identifies a type of product – a 12oz can of Pepsi Cola or an 8 oz bag of salt n vinegar Lay’s chips for example. Every item sold at retail and many other products that use the GS1 system (such as pharmaceutical or medical products) has a GTIN.
It is important to note that a GTIN doesn’t identify an individual item – every 12oz can of Pepsi will have the same GTIN.
Also, no additional data can be encoded in the product barcode – only the 12 digit UPC in the US or 13 digit EAN code internationally. This is why additional barcodes must currently be added to a package in the event a brand owner wants to encode more data.
Traditionally, barcodes in the GS1 system have been used in the supply chain from manufacturer to point of sale. They lose their usefulness once the product has been sold. GS1 Digital Link promises to extend the reach of the GS1 system all the way from the manufacturer to consumer and to provide a means of interaction between the brand owner and the consumer.

So how does it work?

For the first time, GS1 is allowing a 2D QR barcode to be used as the barcode for point of sale.
Encoded within the barcode is a URI (unique resource identifier – an example of which is the familiar website URLs we use every day) and a number of other possible data fields that include:
GTIN
Lot number
Serial number
The expiration date and many more
Some examples:
Note, the examples use the domain id.gs1.org, but brand owners can use their own domains.
An interesting addition to the new specification is that the data fields can be identified by either using the familiar GS1 Application Identifiers (AI) or by text identifiers. Note that this is only a quick intro, so check out the GS1 Digital Link specification to get complete information.
  The ability to include all this data in one barcode means that only one barcode needs to be printed on the package and it can be used for point of sale, traceability, anti-counterfeit and for customer engagement by sending a consumer who scans the code to an interactive website.
GS1 Digital Link could prove to be the biggest revolution in barcoding since the first code was scanned in a store 45 years ago.

When will this start?

It is going to take a while and we can expect to see both traditional UPC codes and the new QR codes used side by side until the infrastructure is in place to handle the new 2D barcodes.
 A survey carried out by the food marketing institute found that in the US nearly 40% of POS scanners are capable of reading 2D codes today and that will increase to about 55% by 2022.
The POS systems to handle the data are running somewhat behind, with an estimated 20% of systems being able to handle this data.
There is clearly a ways to go.
In the same survey, stakeholders saw the advantages of switching to data-rich solutions such as follows:
60% stated better inventory accuracy
40% stated better customer engagement
36% stated anti-counterfeit
35% stated improved recall control
33% stated expiration date control
* Yes, people could choose more than one.
Finally, 85% of stakeholders see 3-5 years to get a higher data density solution to the current UPC established.
So there is certainly a lot of interest in GS1 Digital Link. While I’ve discussed the use of QR codes in this podcast, other data carriers that could be used (and be very interesting) are NFC RFID tags and the Digimarc system that turns the complete package into the barcode. Digimarc will be the topic of a future podcast.
Should be interesting days ahead.
How can we help you meet your objectives for your labeling and barcode operations? Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3. You can also email me at dholliday@idtechnology.com. We’ll be sure to get you in touch with an expert, right in your area!
[post_excerpt] => Using barcodes on packages for customer engagement? This idea is certainly not new – here is a link to a Packaging World article on this very topic from 2011. The article specifically mentioned that QR codes would provide the ability to download coupons, enter contests, play games, and other fun activities – all powered by […] [post_date_gmt] => 2019-08-05 18:10:41 [post_date] => 2019-08-05 18:10:41 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-08-05 18:10:41 [post_modified] => 2019-08-05 18:10:41 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => http://www.labelingnews.com/?p=5952 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Labeling News [syndication_source_uri] => http://www.labelingnews.com [syndication_source_id] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed_id] => 12 [syndication_permalink] => http://www.labelingnews.com/2019/08/customer-engagement-and-more-gs1-digital-link/ [syndication_item_hash] => 1e5148b5aacb103170db86cec5f4b5cf ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 1625 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

Doing filter:faf_image_filter

Execute image filter

Image process

Local save:http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/GS1DL-HEADER.jpg

Image process :: Saving local image

grab remote location : http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/GS1DL-HEADER.jpg

Image exists, checking for same file size

Replacing images : - ON

Using barcodes on packages for customer engagement? This idea is certainly not new – here is a link to a Packaging World article on this very topic from 2011.

The article specifically mentioned that QR codes would provide the ability to download coupons, enter contests, play games, and other fun activities – all powered by those little barcodes.

This all seemed quite exciting, but QR codes got old quickly and the concept seemed to fade away.

Fast forward to today and there is renewed interest in using packaging to actively engage with customers.

Listen to our GS1 Digital Link Podcast

Traditional ways to communicate to customers such as TV and print advertising are not performing as well as In the past.  These are also a one-way form of communication, yelling a message at consumers – no wonder they don’t work as well as in the past. In addition, engagement on a brand’s social media pages is in decline as well. What is a marketer to do?

As a result of all this, brand owners have a renewed interest trying to set up a direct connection to their customers based on the product packaging – the package is potentially the ultimate marketing tool.
Enter smart packaging – a means to allow brands to connect directly with their customers. Generally, a smart package will allow the customer to scan a barcode (yes, usually a QR Code) and be connected to an interactive website.

So QR codes are back – a lot of brands are using them – some quite creatively

Currently, there isn’t a standard to use QR codes  (or any type of barcode) for customer engagement so brands are tending to encode them in different ways – often just a URL, sometimes other data.
Of course, the package’s UPC  barcode still needs to be there so most items would have to have multiple barcodes – rather messy and takes up more space on the package.
The product UPC codes scanned at the point of sale haven’t really changed in the 45 years since the concept was introduced.

Wouldn’t it be great if, rather than have multiple barcodes on a package, a single one could contain the UPC data, weblink for customer engagement? Maybe we can!

Last year GS1 our favorite standards organization came out with a new concept: GS1 Digital Link.

While the name might not be too exciting, Digital Link has the potential to revolutionize how barcoding is used, to add true customer engagement and to (yes really) provide item-level serialization and traceability.
For primary packaging (what we would buy in a store), GS1’s barcoding is built around the concept of the Global Trade Item Number – GTIN. This is what is encoded in the common UPC barcode that is scanned at the checkout.
The GTIN in the item barcode basically consists of a company prefix and an SKU or stock keeping unit number. The GTIN identifies a type of product – a 12oz can of Pepsi Cola or an 8 oz bag of salt n vinegar Lay’s chips for example. Every item sold at retail and many other products that use the GS1 system (such as pharmaceutical or medical products) has a GTIN.
It is important to note that a GTIN doesn’t identify an individual item – every 12oz can of Pepsi will have the same GTIN.
Also, no additional data can be encoded in the product barcode – only the 12 digit UPC in the US or 13 digit EAN code internationally. This is why additional barcodes must currently be added to a package in the event a brand owner wants to encode more data.
Traditionally, barcodes in the GS1 system have been used in the supply chain from manufacturer to point of sale. They lose their usefulness once the product has been sold. GS1 Digital Link promises to extend the reach of the GS1 system all the way from the manufacturer to consumer and to provide a means of interaction between the brand owner and the consumer.

So how does it work?

For the first time, GS1 is allowing a 2D QR barcode to be used as the barcode for point of sale.
Encoded within the barcode is a URI (unique resource identifier – an example of which is the familiar website URLs we use every day) and a number of other possible data fields that include:
GTIN
Lot number
Serial number
The expiration date and many more
Some examples:
Note, the examples use the domain id.gs1.org, but brand owners can use their own domains.
An interesting addition to the new specification is that the data fields can be identified by either using the familiar GS1 Application Identifiers (AI) or by text identifiers. Note that this is only a quick intro, so check out the GS1 Digital Link specification to get complete information.
  The ability to include all this data in one barcode means that only one barcode needs to be printed on the package and it can be used for point of sale, traceability, anti-counterfeit and for customer engagement by sending a consumer who scans the code to an interactive website.
GS1 Digital Link could prove to be the biggest revolution in barcoding since the first code was scanned in a store 45 years ago.

When will this start?

It is going to take a while and we can expect to see both traditional UPC codes and the new QR codes used side by side until the infrastructure is in place to handle the new 2D barcodes.
 A survey carried out by the food marketing institute found that in the US nearly 40% of POS scanners are capable of reading 2D codes today and that will increase to about 55% by 2022.
The POS systems to handle the data are running somewhat behind, with an estimated 20% of systems being able to handle this data.
There is clearly a ways to go.
In the same survey, stakeholders saw the advantages of switching to data-rich solutions such as follows:
60% stated better inventory accuracy
40% stated better customer engagement
36% stated anti-counterfeit
35% stated improved recall control
33% stated expiration date control
* Yes, people could choose more than one.
Finally, 85% of stakeholders see 3-5 years to get a higher data density solution to the current UPC established.
So there is certainly a lot of interest in GS1 Digital Link. While I’ve discussed the use of QR codes in this podcast, other data carriers that could be used (and be very interesting) are NFC RFID tags and the Digimarc system that turns the complete package into the barcode. Digimarc will be the topic of a future podcast.
Should be interesting days ahead.
How can we help you meet your objectives for your labeling and barcode operations? Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3. You can also email me at dholliday@idtechnology.com. We’ll be sure to get you in touch with an expert, right in your area!

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Customer Engagement and More – GS1 Digital Link

Using barcodes on packages for customer engagement? This idea is certainly not new – here is a link to a Packaging World article on this very topic from 2011.

The article specifically mentioned that QR codes would provide the ability to download coupons, enter contests, play games, and other fun activities – all powered by those little barcodes.

This all seemed quite exciting, but QR codes got old quickly and the concept seemed to fade away.

Fast forward to today and there is renewed interest in using packaging to actively engage with customers.

Listen to our GS1 Digital Link Podcast

Traditional ways to communicate to customers such as TV and print advertising are not performing as well as In the past.  These are also a one-way form of communication, yelling a message at consumers – no wonder they don’t work as well as in the past. In addition, engagement on a brand’s social media pages is in decline as well. What is a marketer to do?

As a result of all this, brand owners have a renewed interest trying to set up a direct connection to their customers based on the product packaging – the package is potentially the ultimate marketing tool.
Enter smart packaging – a means to allow brands to connect directly with their customers. Generally, a smart package will allow the customer to scan a barcode (yes, usually a QR Code) and be connected to an interactive website.

So QR codes are back – a lot of brands are using them – some quite creatively

Currently, there isn’t a standard to use QR codes  (or any type of barcode) for customer engagement so brands are tending to encode them in different ways – often just a URL, sometimes other data.
Of course, the package’s UPC  barcode still needs to be there so most items would have to have multiple barcodes – rather messy and takes up more space on the package.
The product UPC codes scanned at the point of sale haven’t really changed in the 45 years since the concept was introduced.

Wouldn’t it be great if, rather than have multiple barcodes on a package, a single one could contain the UPC data, weblink for customer engagement? Maybe we can!

Last year GS1 our favorite standards organization came out with a new concept: GS1 Digital Link.

While the name might not be too exciting, Digital Link has the potential to revolutionize how barcoding is used, to add true customer engagement and to (yes really) provide item-level serialization and traceability.
For primary packaging (what we would buy in a store), GS1’s barcoding is built around the concept of the Global Trade Item Number – GTIN. This is what is encoded in the common UPC barcode that is scanned at the checkout.
The GTIN in the item barcode basically consists of a company prefix and an SKU or stock keeping unit number. The GTIN identifies a type of product – a 12oz can of Pepsi Cola or an 8 oz bag of salt n vinegar Lay’s chips for example. Every item sold at retail and many other products that use the GS1 system (such as pharmaceutical or medical products) has a GTIN.
It is important to note that a GTIN doesn’t identify an individual item – every 12oz can of Pepsi will have the same GTIN.
Also, no additional data can be encoded in the product barcode – only the 12 digit UPC in the US or 13 digit EAN code internationally. This is why additional barcodes must currently be added to a package in the event a brand owner wants to encode more data.
Traditionally, barcodes in the GS1 system have been used in the supply chain from manufacturer to point of sale. They lose their usefulness once the product has been sold. GS1 Digital Link promises to extend the reach of the GS1 system all the way from the manufacturer to consumer and to provide a means of interaction between the brand owner and the consumer.

So how does it work?

For the first time, GS1 is allowing a 2D QR barcode to be used as the barcode for point of sale.
Encoded within the barcode is a URI (unique resource identifier – an example of which is the familiar website URLs we use every day) and a number of other possible data fields that include:
GTIN
Lot number
Serial number
The expiration date and many more
Some examples:
Note, the examples use the domain id.gs1.org, but brand owners can use their own domains.
An interesting addition to the new specification is that the data fields can be identified by either using the familiar GS1 Application Identifiers (AI) or by text identifiers. Note that this is only a quick intro, so check out the GS1 Digital Link specification to get complete information.
  The ability to include all this data in one barcode means that only one barcode needs to be printed on the package and it can be used for point of sale, traceability, anti-counterfeit and for customer engagement by sending a consumer who scans the code to an interactive website.
GS1 Digital Link could prove to be the biggest revolution in barcoding since the first code was scanned in a store 45 years ago.

When will this start?

It is going to take a while and we can expect to see both traditional UPC codes and the new QR codes used side by side until the infrastructure is in place to handle the new 2D barcodes.
 A survey carried out by the food marketing institute found that in the US nearly 40% of POS scanners are capable of reading 2D codes today and that will increase to about 55% by 2022.
The POS systems to handle the data are running somewhat behind, with an estimated 20% of systems being able to handle this data.
There is clearly a ways to go.
In the same survey, stakeholders saw the advantages of switching to data-rich solutions such as follows:
60% stated better inventory accuracy
40% stated better customer engagement
36% stated anti-counterfeit
35% stated improved recall control
33% stated expiration date control
* Yes, people could choose more than one.
Finally, 85% of stakeholders see 3-5 years to get a higher data density solution to the current UPC established.
So there is certainly a lot of interest in GS1 Digital Link. While I’ve discussed the use of QR codes in this podcast, other data carriers that could be used (and be very interesting) are NFC RFID tags and the Digimarc system that turns the complete package into the barcode. Digimarc will be the topic of a future podcast.
Should be interesting days ahead.
How can we help you meet your objectives for your labeling and barcode operations? Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3. You can also email me at dholliday@idtechnology.com. We’ll be sure to get you in touch with an expert, right in your area!

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Customer Engagement and More – GS1 Digital Link

Using barcodes on packages for customer engagement? This idea is certainly not new – here is a link to a Packaging World article on this very topic from 2011.

The article specifically mentioned that QR codes would provide the ability to download coupons, enter contests, play games, and other fun activities – all powered by those little barcodes.

This all seemed quite exciting, but QR codes got old quickly and the concept seemed to fade away.

Fast forward to today and there is renewed interest in using packaging to actively engage with customers.

Customer Engagement and More – GS1 Digital Link

Listen to our GS1 Digital Link Podcast

Traditional ways to communicate to customers such as TV and print advertising are not performing as well as In the past.  These are also a one-way form of communication, yelling a message at consumers – no wonder they don’t work as well as in the past. In addition, engagement on a brand’s social media pages is in decline as well. What is a marketer to do?

As a result of all this, brand owners have a renewed interest trying to set up a direct connection to their customers based on the product packaging – the package is potentially the ultimate marketing tool.
Enter smart packaging – a means to allow brands to connect directly with their customers. Generally, a smart package will allow the customer to scan a barcode (yes, usually a QR Code) and be connected to an interactive website.

So QR codes are back – a lot of brands are using them – some quite creatively

Currently, there isn’t a standard to use QR codes  (or any type of barcode) for customer engagement so brands are tending to encode them in different ways – often just a URL, sometimes other data.
Of course, the package’s UPC  barcode still needs to be there so most items would have to have multiple barcodes – rather messy and takes up more space on the package.
The product UPC codes scanned at the point of sale haven’t really changed in the 45 years since the concept was introduced.

Wouldn’t it be great if, rather than have multiple barcodes on a package, a single one could contain the UPC data, weblink for customer engagement? Maybe we can!

Last year GS1 our favorite standards organization came out with a new concept: GS1 Digital Link.

While the name might not be too exciting, Digital Link has the potential to revolutionize how barcoding is used, to add true customer engagement and to (yes really) provide item-level serialization and traceability.
For primary packaging (what we would buy in a store), GS1’s barcoding is built around the concept of the Global Trade Item Number – GTIN. This is what is encoded in the common UPC barcode that is scanned at the checkout.
The GTIN in the item barcode basically consists of a company prefix and an SKU or stock keeping unit number. The GTIN identifies a type of product – a 12oz can of Pepsi Cola or an 8 oz bag of salt n vinegar Lay’s chips for example. Every item sold at retail and many other products that use the GS1 system (such as pharmaceutical or medical products) has a GTIN.
It is important to note that a GTIN doesn’t identify an individual item – every 12oz can of Pepsi will have the same GTIN.
Also, no additional data can be encoded in the product barcode – only the 12 digit UPC in the US or 13 digit EAN code internationally. This is why additional barcodes must currently be added to a package in the event a brand owner wants to encode more data.
Traditionally, barcodes in the GS1 system have been used in the supply chain from manufacturer to point of sale. They lose their usefulness once the product has been sold. GS1 Digital Link promises to extend the reach of the GS1 system all the way from the manufacturer to consumer and to provide a means of interaction between the brand owner and the consumer.

So how does it work?

For the first time, GS1 is allowing a 2D QR barcode to be used as the barcode for point of sale.
Encoded within the barcode is a URI (unique resource identifier – an example of which is the familiar website URLs we use every day) and a number of other possible data fields that include:
GTIN
Lot number
Serial number
The expiration date and many more
Some examples:
Note, the examples use the domain id.gs1.org, but brand owners can use their own domains.
An interesting addition to the new specification is that the data fields can be identified by either using the familiar GS1 Application Identifiers (AI) or by text identifiers. Note that this is only a quick intro, so check out the GS1 Digital Link specification to get complete information.
  The ability to include all this data in one barcode means that only one barcode needs to be printed on the package and it can be used for point of sale, traceability, anti-counterfeit and for customer engagement by sending a consumer who scans the code to an interactive website.
GS1 Digital Link could prove to be the biggest revolution in barcoding since the first code was scanned in a store 45 years ago.

When will this start?

It is going to take a while and we can expect to see both traditional UPC codes and the new QR codes used side by side until the infrastructure is in place to handle the new 2D barcodes.
 A survey carried out by the food marketing institute found that in the US nearly 40% of POS scanners are capable of reading 2D codes today and that will increase to about 55% by 2022.
The POS systems to handle the data are running somewhat behind, with an estimated 20% of systems being able to handle this data.
There is clearly a ways to go.
In the same survey, stakeholders saw the advantages of switching to data-rich solutions such as follows:
60% stated better inventory accuracy
40% stated better customer engagement
36% stated anti-counterfeit
35% stated improved recall control
33% stated expiration date control
* Yes, people could choose more than one.
Finally, 85% of stakeholders see 3-5 years to get a higher data density solution to the current UPC established.
So there is certainly a lot of interest in GS1 Digital Link. While I’ve discussed the use of QR codes in this podcast, other data carriers that could be used (and be very interesting) are NFC RFID tags and the Digimarc system that turns the complete package into the barcode. Digimarc will be the topic of a future podcast.
Should be interesting days ahead.
How can we help you meet your objectives for your labeling and barcode operations? Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3. You can also email me at dholliday@idtechnology.com. We’ll be sure to get you in touch with an expert, right in your area!

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Customer Engagement and More – GS1 Digital Link

Using barcodes on packages for customer engagement? This idea is certainly not new – here is a link to a Packaging World article on this very topic from 2011.

The article specifically mentioned that QR codes would provide the ability to download coupons, enter contests, play games, and other fun activities – all powered by those little barcodes.

This all seemed quite exciting, but QR codes got old quickly and the concept seemed to fade away.

Fast forward to today and there is renewed interest in using packaging to actively engage with customers.

Customer Engagement and More – GS1 Digital Link

Listen to our GS1 Digital Link Podcast

Traditional ways to communicate to customers such as TV and print advertising are not performing as well as In the past.  These are also a one-way form of communication, yelling a message at consumers – no wonder they don’t work as well as in the past. In addition, engagement on a brand’s social media pages is in decline as well. What is a marketer to do?

As a result of all this, brand owners have a renewed interest trying to set up a direct connection to their customers based on the product packaging – the package is potentially the ultimate marketing tool.
Enter smart packaging – a means to allow brands to connect directly with their customers. Generally, a smart package will allow the customer to scan a barcode (yes, usually a QR Code) and be connected to an interactive website.

So QR codes are back – a lot of brands are using them – some quite creatively

Currently, there isn’t a standard to use QR codes  (or any type of barcode) for customer engagement so brands are tending to encode them in different ways – often just a URL, sometimes other data.
Of course, the package’s UPC  barcode still needs to be there so most items would have to have multiple barcodes – rather messy and takes up more space on the package.
The product UPC codes scanned at the point of sale haven’t really changed in the 45 years since the concept was introduced.

Wouldn’t it be great if, rather than have multiple barcodes on a package, a single one could contain the UPC data, weblink for customer engagement? Maybe we can!

Last year GS1 our favorite standards organization came out with a new concept: GS1 Digital Link.

While the name might not be too exciting, Digital Link has the potential to revolutionize how barcoding is used, to add true customer engagement and to (yes really) provide item-level serialization and traceability.
For primary packaging (what we would buy in a store), GS1’s barcoding is built around the concept of the Global Trade Item Number – GTIN. This is what is encoded in the common UPC barcode that is scanned at the checkout.
The GTIN in the item barcode basically consists of a company prefix and an SKU or stock keeping unit number. The GTIN identifies a type of product – a 12oz can of Pepsi Cola or an 8 oz bag of salt n vinegar Lay’s chips for example. Every item sold at retail and many other products that use the GS1 system (such as pharmaceutical or medical products) has a GTIN.
It is important to note that a GTIN doesn’t identify an individual item – every 12oz can of Pepsi will have the same GTIN.
Also, no additional data can be encoded in the product barcode – only the 12 digit UPC in the US or 13 digit EAN code internationally. This is why additional barcodes must currently be added to a package in the event a brand owner wants to encode more data.
Traditionally, barcodes in the GS1 system have been used in the supply chain from manufacturer to point of sale. They lose their usefulness once the product has been sold. GS1 Digital Link promises to extend the reach of the GS1 system all the way from the manufacturer to consumer and to provide a means of interaction between the brand owner and the consumer.

So how does it work?

For the first time, GS1 is allowing a 2D QR barcode to be used as the barcode for point of sale.
Encoded within the barcode is a URI (unique resource identifier – an example of which is the familiar website URLs we use every day) and a number of other possible data fields that include:
GTIN
Lot number
Serial number
The expiration date and many more
Some examples:
Note, the examples use the domain id.gs1.org, but brand owners can use their own domains.
Customer Engagement and More – GS1 Digital Link
An interesting addition to the new specification is that the data fields can be identified by either using the familiar GS1 Application Identifiers (AI) or by text identifiers. Note that this is only a quick intro, so check out the GS1 Digital Link specification to get complete information.
  The ability to include all this data in one barcode means that only one barcode needs to be printed on the package and it can be used for point of sale, traceability, anti-counterfeit and for customer engagement by sending a consumer who scans the code to an interactive website.
GS1 Digital Link could prove to be the biggest revolution in barcoding since the first code was scanned in a store 45 years ago.

When will this start?

It is going to take a while and we can expect to see both traditional UPC codes and the new QR codes used side by side until the infrastructure is in place to handle the new 2D barcodes.
 A survey carried out by the food marketing institute found that in the US nearly 40% of POS scanners are capable of reading 2D codes today and that will increase to about 55% by 2022.
The POS systems to handle the data are running somewhat behind, with an estimated 20% of systems being able to handle this data.
There is clearly a ways to go.
In the same survey, stakeholders saw the advantages of switching to data-rich solutions such as follows:
60% stated better inventory accuracy
40% stated better customer engagement
36% stated anti-counterfeit
35% stated improved recall control
33% stated expiration date control
* Yes, people could choose more than one.
Finally, 85% of stakeholders see 3-5 years to get a higher data density solution to the current UPC established.
So there is certainly a lot of interest in GS1 Digital Link. While I’ve discussed the use of QR codes in this podcast, other data carriers that could be used (and be very interesting) are NFC RFID tags and the Digimarc system that turns the complete package into the barcode. Digimarc will be the topic of a future podcast.
Should be interesting days ahead.
How can we help you meet your objectives for your labeling and barcode operations? Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3. You can also email me at dholliday@idtechnology.com. We’ll be sure to get you in touch with an expert, right in your area!

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Customer Engagement and More – GS1 Digital Link

Using barcodes on packages for customer engagement? This idea is certainly not new – here is a link to a Packaging World article on this very topic from 2011.

The article specifically mentioned that QR codes would provide the ability to download coupons, enter contests, play games, and other fun activities – all powered by those little barcodes.

This all seemed quite exciting, but QR codes got old quickly and the concept seemed to fade away.

Fast forward to today and there is renewed interest in using packaging to actively engage with customers.

Customer Engagement and More – GS1 Digital Link

Listen to our GS1 Digital Link Podcast

Traditional ways to communicate to customers such as TV and print advertising are not performing as well as In the past.  These are also a one-way form of communication, yelling a message at consumers – no wonder they don’t work as well as in the past. In addition, engagement on a brand’s social media pages is in decline as well. What is a marketer to do?

As a result of all this, brand owners have a renewed interest trying to set up a direct connection to their customers based on the product packaging – the package is potentially the ultimate marketing tool.
Enter smart packaging – a means to allow brands to connect directly with their customers. Generally, a smart package will allow the customer to scan a barcode (yes, usually a QR Code) and be connected to an interactive website.

So QR codes are back – a lot of brands are using them – some quite creatively

Currently, there isn’t a standard to use QR codes  (or any type of barcode) for customer engagement so brands are tending to encode them in different ways – often just a URL, sometimes other data.
Of course, the package’s UPC  barcode still needs to be there so most items would have to have multiple barcodes – rather messy and takes up more space on the package.
The product UPC codes scanned at the point of sale haven’t really changed in the 45 years since the concept was introduced.

Wouldn’t it be great if, rather than have multiple barcodes on a package, a single one could contain the UPC data, weblink for customer engagement? Maybe we can!

Last year GS1 our favorite standards organization came out with a new concept: GS1 Digital Link.

While the name might not be too exciting, Digital Link has the potential to revolutionize how barcoding is used, to add true customer engagement and to (yes really) provide item-level serialization and traceability.
For primary packaging (what we would buy in a store), GS1’s barcoding is built around the concept of the Global Trade Item Number – GTIN. This is what is encoded in the common UPC barcode that is scanned at the checkout.
The GTIN in the item barcode basically consists of a company prefix and an SKU or stock keeping unit number. The GTIN identifies a type of product – a 12oz can of Pepsi Cola or an 8 oz bag of salt n vinegar Lay’s chips for example. Every item sold at retail and many other products that use the GS1 system (such as pharmaceutical or medical products) has a GTIN.
It is important to note that a GTIN doesn’t identify an individual item – every 12oz can of Pepsi will have the same GTIN.
Also, no additional data can be encoded in the product barcode – only the 12 digit UPC in the US or 13 digit EAN code internationally. This is why additional barcodes must currently be added to a package in the event a brand owner wants to encode more data.
Traditionally, barcodes in the GS1 system have been used in the supply chain from manufacturer to point of sale. They lose their usefulness once the product has been sold. GS1 Digital Link promises to extend the reach of the GS1 system all the way from the manufacturer to consumer and to provide a means of interaction between the brand owner and the consumer.

So how does it work?

For the first time, GS1 is allowing a 2D QR barcode to be used as the barcode for point of sale.
Encoded within the barcode is a URI (unique resource identifier – an example of which is the familiar website URLs we use every day) and a number of other possible data fields that include:
GTIN
Lot number
Serial number
The expiration date and many more
Some examples:
Note, the examples use the domain id.gs1.org, but brand owners can use their own domains.
Customer Engagement and More – GS1 Digital Link
Customer Engagement and More – GS1 Digital Link
An interesting addition to the new specification is that the data fields can be identified by either using the familiar GS1 Application Identifiers (AI) or by text identifiers. Note that this is only a quick intro, so check out the GS1 Digital Link specification to get complete information.
  The ability to include all this data in one barcode means that only one barcode needs to be printed on the package and it can be used for point of sale, traceability, anti-counterfeit and for customer engagement by sending a consumer who scans the code to an interactive website.
GS1 Digital Link could prove to be the biggest revolution in barcoding since the first code was scanned in a store 45 years ago.

When will this start?

It is going to take a while and we can expect to see both traditional UPC codes and the new QR codes used side by side until the infrastructure is in place to handle the new 2D barcodes.
 A survey carried out by the food marketing institute found that in the US nearly 40% of POS scanners are capable of reading 2D codes today and that will increase to about 55% by 2022.
The POS systems to handle the data are running somewhat behind, with an estimated 20% of systems being able to handle this data.
There is clearly a ways to go.
In the same survey, stakeholders saw the advantages of switching to data-rich solutions such as follows:
60% stated better inventory accuracy
40% stated better customer engagement
36% stated anti-counterfeit
35% stated improved recall control
33% stated expiration date control
* Yes, people could choose more than one.
Finally, 85% of stakeholders see 3-5 years to get a higher data density solution to the current UPC established.
So there is certainly a lot of interest in GS1 Digital Link. While I’ve discussed the use of QR codes in this podcast, other data carriers that could be used (and be very interesting) are NFC RFID tags and the Digimarc system that turns the complete package into the barcode. Digimarc will be the topic of a future podcast.
Should be interesting days ahead.
How can we help you meet your objectives for your labeling and barcode operations? Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3. You can also email me at dholliday@idtechnology.com. We’ll be sure to get you in touch with an expert, right in your area!

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Customer Engagement and More – GS1 Digital Link

Using barcodes on packages for customer engagement? This idea is certainly not new – here is a link to a Packaging World article on this very topic from 2011.

The article specifically mentioned that QR codes would provide the ability to download coupons, enter contests, play games, and other fun activities – all powered by those little barcodes.

This all seemed quite exciting, but QR codes got old quickly and the concept seemed to fade away.

Fast forward to today and there is renewed interest in using packaging to actively engage with customers.

Customer Engagement and More – GS1 Digital Link

Listen to our GS1 Digital Link Podcast

Traditional ways to communicate to customers such as TV and print advertising are not performing as well as In the past.  These are also a one-way form of communication, yelling a message at consumers – no wonder they don’t work as well as in the past. In addition, engagement on a brand’s social media pages is in decline as well. What is a marketer to do?

As a result of all this, brand owners have a renewed interest trying to set up a direct connection to their customers based on the product packaging – the package is potentially the ultimate marketing tool.
Enter smart packaging – a means to allow brands to connect directly with their customers. Generally, a smart package will allow the customer to scan a barcode (yes, usually a QR Code) and be connected to an interactive website.

So QR codes are back – a lot of brands are using them – some quite creatively

Currently, there isn’t a standard to use QR codes  (or any type of barcode) for customer engagement so brands are tending to encode them in different ways – often just a URL, sometimes other data.
Of course, the package’s UPC  barcode still needs to be there so most items would have to have multiple barcodes – rather messy and takes up more space on the package.
The product UPC codes scanned at the point of sale haven’t really changed in the 45 years since the concept was introduced.

Wouldn’t it be great if, rather than have multiple barcodes on a package, a single one could contain the UPC data, weblink for customer engagement? Maybe we can!

Last year GS1 our favorite standards organization came out with a new concept: GS1 Digital Link.

While the name might not be too exciting, Digital Link has the potential to revolutionize how barcoding is used, to add true customer engagement and to (yes really) provide item-level serialization and traceability.
For primary packaging (what we would buy in a store), GS1’s barcoding is built around the concept of the Global Trade Item Number – GTIN. This is what is encoded in the common UPC barcode that is scanned at the checkout.
The GTIN in the item barcode basically consists of a company prefix and an SKU or stock keeping unit number. The GTIN identifies a type of product – a 12oz can of Pepsi Cola or an 8 oz bag of salt n vinegar Lay’s chips for example. Every item sold at retail and many other products that use the GS1 system (such as pharmaceutical or medical products) has a GTIN.
It is important to note that a GTIN doesn’t identify an individual item – every 12oz can of Pepsi will have the same GTIN.
Also, no additional data can be encoded in the product barcode – only the 12 digit UPC in the US or 13 digit EAN code internationally. This is why additional barcodes must currently be added to a package in the event a brand owner wants to encode more data.
Traditionally, barcodes in the GS1 system have been used in the supply chain from manufacturer to point of sale. They lose their usefulness once the product has been sold. GS1 Digital Link promises to extend the reach of the GS1 system all the way from the manufacturer to consumer and to provide a means of interaction between the brand owner and the consumer.

So how does it work?

For the first time, GS1 is allowing a 2D QR barcode to be used as the barcode for point of sale.
Encoded within the barcode is a URI (unique resource identifier – an example of which is the familiar website URLs we use every day) and a number of other possible data fields that include:
GTIN
Lot number
Serial number
The expiration date and many more
Some examples:
Note, the examples use the domain id.gs1.org, but brand owners can use their own domains.
Customer Engagement and More – GS1 Digital Link
Customer Engagement and More – GS1 Digital Link
Customer Engagement and More – GS1 Digital Link
An interesting addition to the new specification is that the data fields can be identified by either using the familiar GS1 Application Identifiers (AI) or by text identifiers. Note that this is only a quick intro, so check out the GS1 Digital Link specification to get complete information.
  The ability to include all this data in one barcode means that only one barcode needs to be printed on the package and it can be used for point of sale, traceability, anti-counterfeit and for customer engagement by sending a consumer who scans the code to an interactive website.
GS1 Digital Link could prove to be the biggest revolution in barcoding since the first code was scanned in a store 45 years ago.

When will this start?

It is going to take a while and we can expect to see both traditional UPC codes and the new QR codes used side by side until the infrastructure is in place to handle the new 2D barcodes.
 A survey carried out by the food marketing institute found that in the US nearly 40% of POS scanners are capable of reading 2D codes today and that will increase to about 55% by 2022.
The POS systems to handle the data are running somewhat behind, with an estimated 20% of systems being able to handle this data.
There is clearly a ways to go.
In the same survey, stakeholders saw the advantages of switching to data-rich solutions such as follows:
60% stated better inventory accuracy
40% stated better customer engagement
36% stated anti-counterfeit
35% stated improved recall control
33% stated expiration date control
* Yes, people could choose more than one.
Finally, 85% of stakeholders see 3-5 years to get a higher data density solution to the current UPC established.
So there is certainly a lot of interest in GS1 Digital Link. While I’ve discussed the use of QR codes in this podcast, other data carriers that could be used (and be very interesting) are NFC RFID tags and the Digimarc system that turns the complete package into the barcode. Digimarc will be the topic of a future podcast.
Should be interesting days ahead.
How can we help you meet your objectives for your labeling and barcode operations? Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3. You can also email me at dholliday@idtechnology.com. We’ll be sure to get you in touch with an expert, right in your area!
[post_excerpt] => Using barcodes on packages for customer engagement? This idea is certainly not new – here is a link to a Packaging World article on this very topic from 2011. The article specifically mentioned that QR codes would provide the ability to download coupons, enter contests, play games, and other fun activities – all powered by […] [post_date_gmt] => 2019-08-05 18:10:41 [post_date] => 2019-08-05 18:10:41 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-08-05 18:10:41 [post_modified] => 2019-08-05 18:10:41 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => http://www.labelingnews.com/?p=5952 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Labeling News [syndication_source_uri] => http://www.labelingnews.com [syndication_source_id] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed_id] => 12 [syndication_permalink] => http://www.labelingnews.com/2019/08/customer-engagement-and-more-gs1-digital-link/ [syndication_item_hash] => 1e5148b5aacb103170db86cec5f4b5cf [faf_featured_image] => 0 [faf_process_image] => 0,0,0,0,0 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 1625 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

FAF deciding on filters on post to be syndicated:

End of Parts & Service – SATO Printers

Array ( [post_title] => End of Parts & Service – SATO Printers [post_content] =>

As companies improve their products and introduce new models, earlier generations are discontinued and eventually can no longer be supported.

I recently received a reminder from SATO that some of their legacy models have reached the end of their service/support period.

Included are the following models:

SATO EOS

 

You can see the original SATO end of service notice here: SATO EOS Doc

Most users of these printers have already upgraded to current models, but if you happen to still be using any of these models, please note that by the end of August, service will end and spare parts will be limited until the end of the year, after which they can’t be ordered.

What Should You Do?

If you do use any of these discontinued printers, it is best to upgrade to a new  SATO CLNX printer. The new model has a lot of advantages and is designed to be a simple replacement for older printers. SATO also has a special trade-in program for the legacy printers that you can take advantage of. ID Technology can help you with every step of this process.

Want to Get Started?

Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3. You can also email me at dholliday@idtechnology.com. We’ll be sure to get you in touch with one of our labeling experts, right in your area.

[post_excerpt] => As companies improve their products and introduce new models, earlier generations are discontinued and eventually can no longer be supported. I recently received a reminder from SATO that some of their legacy models have reached the end of their service/support period. Included are the following models:   You can see the original SATO end of […] [post_date_gmt] => 2019-07-08 13:43:26 [post_date] => 2019-07-08 13:43:26 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-07-08 13:43:26 [post_modified] => 2019-07-08 13:43:26 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => http://www.labelingnews.com/?p=5948 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Labeling News [syndication_source_uri] => http://www.labelingnews.com [syndication_source_id] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed_id] => 12 [syndication_permalink] => http://www.labelingnews.com/2019/07/end-of-parts-service-sato-printers/ [syndication_item_hash] => ad8095d3f74bd5de50bcb5355c1f6d3e ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 1625 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

Doing filter:faf_image_filter

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Local save:http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/SATO-end-support-1.jpg

Image process :: Saving local image

grab remote location : http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/SATO-end-support-1.jpg

Image exists, checking for same file size

Replacing images : SATO EOS - SATO EOS ON

As companies improve their products and introduce new models, earlier generations are discontinued and eventually can no longer be supported.

I recently received a reminder from SATO that some of their legacy models have reached the end of their service/support period.

Included are the following models:

SATO EOS

 

You can see the original SATO end of service notice here: SATO EOS Doc

Most users of these printers have already upgraded to current models, but if you happen to still be using any of these models, please note that by the end of August, service will end and spare parts will be limited until the end of the year, after which they can’t be ordered.

What Should You Do?

If you do use any of these discontinued printers, it is best to upgrade to a new  SATO CLNX printer. The new model has a lot of advantages and is designed to be a simple replacement for older printers. SATO also has a special trade-in program for the legacy printers that you can take advantage of. ID Technology can help you with every step of this process.

Want to Get Started?

Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3. You can also email me at dholliday@idtechnology.com. We’ll be sure to get you in touch with one of our labeling experts, right in your area.

Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Labeling News [syndication_source_uri] => http://www.labelingnews.com [syndication_source_id] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed_id] => 12 [syndication_permalink] => http://www.labelingnews.com/2019/07/end-of-parts-service-sato-printers/ [syndication_item_hash] => ad8095d3f74bd5de50bcb5355c1f6d3e )

Execute : Enclosure images

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Array ( [0] => )

No match on

Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :End of Parts & Service – SATO Printers

Array ( [post_title] => End of Parts & Service – SATO Printers [post_content] =>

As companies improve their products and introduce new models, earlier generations are discontinued and eventually can no longer be supported.

I recently received a reminder from SATO that some of their legacy models have reached the end of their service/support period.

Included are the following models:

End of Parts & Service – SATO Printers

 

You can see the original SATO end of service notice here: SATO EOS Doc

Most users of these printers have already upgraded to current models, but if you happen to still be using any of these models, please note that by the end of August, service will end and spare parts will be limited until the end of the year, after which they can’t be ordered.

What Should You Do?

If you do use any of these discontinued printers, it is best to upgrade to a new  SATO CLNX printer. The new model has a lot of advantages and is designed to be a simple replacement for older printers. SATO also has a special trade-in program for the legacy printers that you can take advantage of. ID Technology can help you with every step of this process.

Want to Get Started?

Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3. You can also email me at dholliday@idtechnology.com. We’ll be sure to get you in touch with one of our labeling experts, right in your area.

[post_excerpt] => As companies improve their products and introduce new models, earlier generations are discontinued and eventually can no longer be supported. I recently received a reminder from SATO that some of their legacy models have reached the end of their service/support period. Included are the following models:   You can see the original SATO end of […] [post_date_gmt] => 2019-07-08 13:43:26 [post_date] => 2019-07-08 13:43:26 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-07-08 13:43:26 [post_modified] => 2019-07-08 13:43:26 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => http://www.labelingnews.com/?p=5948 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Labeling News [syndication_source_uri] => http://www.labelingnews.com [syndication_source_id] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed_id] => 12 [syndication_permalink] => http://www.labelingnews.com/2019/07/end-of-parts-service-sato-printers/ [syndication_item_hash] => ad8095d3f74bd5de50bcb5355c1f6d3e [faf_featured_image] => 0 [faf_process_image] => 0 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 1625 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

FAF deciding on filters on post to be syndicated:

Podcast – Lasers and Sustainability

Array ( [post_title] => Podcast – Lasers and Sustainability [post_content] =>

The Labeling News PodcastOur most recent podcast covered two topics:

The Loop waste-free packaging concept and how laser coding can help brands meet their sustainability targets.

In this episode I take advantage of a visit to Macsa ID in Barcelona, to chat with Macsa’s CEO Jordi Pinot on the topic of sustainability in packaging and how laser coding can help companies meet their sustainability goals.

Before this, there is a quick update on the Loop circular packaging system. Kroger is now a Loop partner here in the US as well as Walgreens. I’m still somewhat skeptical about this, but it does seem to be making progress.

Loop Waste Free Packaging Concept

On the topic of lasers for coding and marking products, Macsa has a very complete line up of laser systems for just about every application – see more info here: https://www.idtechnology.com/products/coding-solutions/laser-coders/

Laser Coding Can Help Meet Sustainability Targets

In the podcast, we discuss how laser coding allows for permanent prints to be added to all kinds of products. Lasers use no inks or solvents, making them an environmentally friendly way to add date and traceability codes as well as barcodes to many types of packaging materials.

Listen to the podcast here: Labeling News Podcast Episode 5   or search for Labeling News at Apple Podcasts or Spotify.

 

[post_excerpt] => Our most recent podcast covered two topics: The Loop waste-free packaging concept and how laser coding can help brands meet their sustainability targets. In this episode I take advantage of a visit to Macsa ID in Barcelona, to chat with Macsa’s CEO Jordi Pinot on the topic of sustainability in packaging and how laser coding […] [post_date_gmt] => 2019-06-20 12:43:21 [post_date] => 2019-06-20 12:43:21 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-06-20 12:43:21 [post_modified] => 2019-06-20 12:43:21 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => http://www.labelingnews.com/?p=5942 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Labeling News [syndication_source_uri] => http://www.labelingnews.com [syndication_source_id] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed_id] => 12 [syndication_permalink] => http://www.labelingnews.com/2019/06/podcast-lasers-and-sustainability/ [syndication_item_hash] => 0b8ad6117407d36c3ba725c7ac734c57 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 1625 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

Doing filter:faf_image_filter

Execute image filter

Image process

Local save:http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/PodcastThumbblog-150x150.jpg

Image process :: Saving local image

grab remote location : http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/PodcastThumbblog-150x150.jpg

Image exists, checking for same file size

Replacing images : The Labeling News Podcast - The Labeling News Podcast ON

The Labeling News PodcastOur most recent podcast covered two topics:

The Loop waste-free packaging concept and how laser coding can help brands meet their sustainability targets.

In this episode I take advantage of a visit to Macsa ID in Barcelona, to chat with Macsa’s CEO Jordi Pinot on the topic of sustainability in packaging and how laser coding can help companies meet their sustainability goals.

Before this, there is a quick update on the Loop circular packaging system. Kroger is now a Loop partner here in the US as well as Walgreens. I’m still somewhat skeptical about this, but it does seem to be making progress.

Loop Waste Free Packaging Concept

On the topic of lasers for coding and marking products, Macsa has a very complete line up of laser systems for just about every application – see more info here: https://www.idtechnology.com/products/coding-solutions/laser-coders/

Laser Coding Can Help Meet Sustainability Targets

In the podcast, we discuss how laser coding allows for permanent prints to be added to all kinds of products. Lasers use no inks or solvents, making them an environmentally friendly way to add date and traceability codes as well as barcodes to many types of packaging materials.

Listen to the podcast here: Labeling News Podcast Episode 5   or search for Labeling News at Apple Podcasts or Spotify.

 

Local save:http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/Loop-Packaging-Concept.jpg

Image process :: Saving local image

grab remote location : http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/Loop-Packaging-Concept.jpg

Image exists, checking for same file size

Replacing images : - ON

Podcast – Lasers and SustainabilityOur most recent podcast covered two topics:

The Loop waste-free packaging concept and how laser coding can help brands meet their sustainability targets.

In this episode I take advantage of a visit to Macsa ID in Barcelona, to chat with Macsa’s CEO Jordi Pinot on the topic of sustainability in packaging and how laser coding can help companies meet their sustainability goals.

Before this, there is a quick update on the Loop circular packaging system. Kroger is now a Loop partner here in the US as well as Walgreens. I’m still somewhat skeptical about this, but it does seem to be making progress.

Loop Waste Free Packaging Concept

On the topic of lasers for coding and marking products, Macsa has a very complete line up of laser systems for just about every application – see more info here: https://www.idtechnology.com/products/coding-solutions/laser-coders/

Laser Coding Can Help Meet Sustainability Targets

In the podcast, we discuss how laser coding allows for permanent prints to be added to all kinds of products. Lasers use no inks or solvents, making them an environmentally friendly way to add date and traceability codes as well as barcodes to many types of packaging materials.

Listen to the podcast here: Labeling News Podcast Episode 5   or search for Labeling News at Apple Podcasts or Spotify.

 

Local save:http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/lasers-sustainabilty.jpg

Image process :: Saving local image

grab remote location : http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/lasers-sustainabilty.jpg

Image exists, checking for same file size

Replacing images : - ON

Podcast – Lasers and SustainabilityOur most recent podcast covered two topics:

The Loop waste-free packaging concept and how laser coding can help brands meet their sustainability targets.

In this episode I take advantage of a visit to Macsa ID in Barcelona, to chat with Macsa’s CEO Jordi Pinot on the topic of sustainability in packaging and how laser coding can help companies meet their sustainability goals.

Before this, there is a quick update on the Loop circular packaging system. Kroger is now a Loop partner here in the US as well as Walgreens. I’m still somewhat skeptical about this, but it does seem to be making progress.

Podcast – Lasers and Sustainability

Loop Waste Free Packaging Concept

On the topic of lasers for coding and marking products, Macsa has a very complete line up of laser systems for just about every application – see more info here: https://www.idtechnology.com/products/coding-solutions/laser-coders/

Laser Coding Can Help Meet Sustainability Targets

In the podcast, we discuss how laser coding allows for permanent prints to be added to all kinds of products. Lasers use no inks or solvents, making them an environmentally friendly way to add date and traceability codes as well as barcodes to many types of packaging materials.

Listen to the podcast here: Labeling News Podcast Episode 5   or search for Labeling News at Apple Podcasts or Spotify.

 

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Execute : Enclosure images

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Array ( [0] => )

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Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :Podcast – Lasers and Sustainability

Array ( [post_title] => Podcast – Lasers and Sustainability [post_content] =>

Podcast – Lasers and SustainabilityOur most recent podcast covered two topics:

The Loop waste-free packaging concept and how laser coding can help brands meet their sustainability targets.

In this episode I take advantage of a visit to Macsa ID in Barcelona, to chat with Macsa’s CEO Jordi Pinot on the topic of sustainability in packaging and how laser coding can help companies meet their sustainability goals.

Before this, there is a quick update on the Loop circular packaging system. Kroger is now a Loop partner here in the US as well as Walgreens. I’m still somewhat skeptical about this, but it does seem to be making progress.

Podcast – Lasers and Sustainability

Loop Waste Free Packaging Concept

On the topic of lasers for coding and marking products, Macsa has a very complete line up of laser systems for just about every application – see more info here: https://www.idtechnology.com/products/coding-solutions/laser-coders/

Podcast – Lasers and Sustainability

Laser Coding Can Help Meet Sustainability Targets

In the podcast, we discuss how laser coding allows for permanent prints to be added to all kinds of products. Lasers use no inks or solvents, making them an environmentally friendly way to add date and traceability codes as well as barcodes to many types of packaging materials.

Listen to the podcast here: Labeling News Podcast Episode 5   or search for Labeling News at Apple Podcasts or Spotify.

 

[post_excerpt] => Our most recent podcast covered two topics: The Loop waste-free packaging concept and how laser coding can help brands meet their sustainability targets. In this episode I take advantage of a visit to Macsa ID in Barcelona, to chat with Macsa’s CEO Jordi Pinot on the topic of sustainability in packaging and how laser coding […] [post_date_gmt] => 2019-06-20 12:43:21 [post_date] => 2019-06-20 12:43:21 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-06-20 12:43:21 [post_modified] => 2019-06-20 12:43:21 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => http://www.labelingnews.com/?p=5942 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Labeling News [syndication_source_uri] => http://www.labelingnews.com [syndication_source_id] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed_id] => 12 [syndication_permalink] => http://www.labelingnews.com/2019/06/podcast-lasers-and-sustainability/ [syndication_item_hash] => 0b8ad6117407d36c3ba725c7ac734c57 [faf_featured_image] => 0 [faf_process_image] => 0,0,0 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 1625 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

FAF deciding on filters on post to be syndicated:

Product Handling Considerations for Barcoding on Shipping Cases

Array ( [post_title] => Product Handling Considerations for Barcoding on Shipping Cases [post_content] =>

Using inkjet printers to add variable information to shipping cases, is increasing in popularity. Using this technique can dramatically reduce the number of pre-printed items that need to be managed and fit into company efforts to increase digitalization and move to a lean workflow.

Here at ID Technology, we have a lot of experience when it comes to installing inkjet systems for printing barcodes, text and graphics onto corrugated cases. We are a founding distributor of the FoxJet ProSeries system and have won the prestigious Regency Award for top FoxJet distributor for 14 consecutive years.

If there is one thing we’ve learned over this time, it’s that having good product handling is as important as having good printing equipment for getting the high-quality, compliant GS1 barcodes that customers demand. If the boxes are not presented consistently and accurately to the printheads, this will show in poor print quality and in particular will not allow high-quality barcodes to be printed.

To help educate users on best practices for product handling, our friends at FoxJet recently produced a detailed whitepaper on this topic that goes over many of the issues that are important to ensure great quality printing every time.

FoxJet ProSeries Printers

The whitepaper the transition from the case taper or sealer to the conveyor where the barcode printers are installed as being an area of crucial importance. Because space is often limited on packaging lines, the printheads often have to be installed very close to the exit of the case sealer. Some important factors are:

Carton Control – Proximity to the Printhead

It is important that after leaving the case sealer, the boxes are correctly presented the correct distance from the printheads. The drops of ink that are fired from the printheads can only travel a short distance while maintaining accuracy. If the box is too far away, print quality will decline and if so close it hits the printhead, damage might occur.

Be sure to control the boxes gently so that the boxes are undamaged as they pass through your packaging processes.

It’s best to use guide rails to accurately control the position of the box and even better use in conjunction with FoxJet’s retracting printhead brackets. This bracket uses a roller allow the printhead to be the correct distance from the box every time.

Product/Conveyor Speed

Ensure that boxes leaving your case sealer are traveling at a speed that is within the limits of your inkjet printer. Our FoxJet ProSeries printheads are able to print high-quality text, barcodes and images at up to 300ft per minute, which is enough for all but the fastest production lines.

Angel Hair

No, we are not talking pasta here! Some case sealing machines use hot melt adhesive to hold the flaps on the boxes closed. At times the adhesive applicators can leave a stringy residue behind that can get stuck to the printheads and block the tiny nozzles. Dust from the corrugated boxes can be bad too – be sure to regularly clean your packaging equipment and the printheads.

Vibrations

Good quality printing depends on the boxes being transferred smoothly past the printheads. Make sure your conveyor belt runs smoothly and that you are not dropping boxes onto the conveyor where the printheads are mounted. We’ve seen this happen and the results are not always pretty!

Best Practice of All

The best way to get the best labeling or coding for your shipping cases is to connect with your local ID Technology representative. With many years of experience, combined with the case packing, sealing and product handling of ProMach, we are able to help you determine the best solution for all your case coding or labeling needs.

How can ID Technology and ProMach help you meet your objectives for your packaging barcode and coding operations? Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3. You can also email me at dholliday@idtechnology.com. We’ll be sure to get you in touch with an expert, right in your area!

[post_excerpt] => Using inkjet printers to add variable information to shipping cases, is increasing in popularity. Using this technique can dramatically reduce the number of pre-printed items that need to be managed and fit into company efforts to increase digitalization and move to a lean workflow. Here at ID Technology, we have a lot of experience when […] [post_date_gmt] => 2019-06-18 21:03:04 [post_date] => 2019-06-18 21:03:04 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-06-18 21:03:04 [post_modified] => 2019-06-18 21:03:04 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => http://www.labelingnews.com/?p=5937 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Labeling News [syndication_source_uri] => http://www.labelingnews.com [syndication_source_id] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed_id] => 12 [syndication_permalink] => http://www.labelingnews.com/2019/06/product-handling-considerations-for-barcoding-on-shipping-cases/ [syndication_item_hash] => 380c6e3d4f6ebf63ea44ce5e8d7bf988 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 1625 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

Doing filter:faf_image_filter

Execute image filter

Image process

Local save:http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/warehouse-pallets.jpg

Image process :: Saving local image

grab remote location : http://www.labelingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/warehouse-pallets.jpg

Image exists, checking for same file size

Replacing images : - ON

Using inkjet printers to add variable information to shipping cases, is increasing in popularity. Using this technique can dramatically reduce the number of pre-printed items that need to be managed and fit into company efforts to increase digitalization and move to a lean workflow.

Here at ID Technology, we have a lot of experience when it comes to installing inkjet systems for printing barcodes, text and graphics onto corrugated cases. We are a founding distributor of the FoxJet ProSeries system and have won the prestigious Regency Award for top FoxJet distributor for 14 consecutive years.

If there is one thing we’ve learned over this time, it’s that having good product handling is as important as having good printing equipment for getting the high-quality, compliant GS1 barcodes that customers demand. If the boxes are not presented consistently and accurately to the printheads, this will show in poor print quality and in particular will not allow high-quality barcodes to be printed.

To help educate users on best practices for product handling, our friends at FoxJet recently produced a detailed whitepaper on this topic that goes over many of the issues that are important to ensure great quality printing every time.

FoxJet ProSeries Printers

The whitepaper the transition from the case taper or sealer to the conveyor where the barcode printers are installed as being an area of crucial importance. Because space is often limited on packaging lines, the printheads often have to be installed very close to the exit of the case sealer. Some important factors are:

Carton Control – Proximity to the Printhead

It is important that after leaving the case sealer, the boxes are correctly presented the correct distance from the printheads. The drops of ink that are fired from the printheads can only travel a short distance while maintaining accuracy. If the box is too far away, print quality will decline and if so close it hits the printhead, damage might occur.

Be sure to control the boxes gently so that the boxes are undamaged as they pass through your packaging processes.

It’s best to use guide rails to accurately control the position of the box and even better use in conjunction with FoxJet’s retracting printhead brackets. This bracket uses a roller allow the printhead to be the correct distance from the box every time.

Product/Conveyor Speed

Ensure that boxes leaving your case sealer are traveling at a speed that is within the limits of your inkjet printer. Our FoxJet ProSeries printheads are able to print high-quality text, barcodes and images at up to 300ft per minute, which is enough for all but the fastest production lines.

Angel Hair

No, we are not talking pasta here! Some case sealing machines use hot melt adhesive to hold the flaps on the boxes closed. At times the adhesive applicators can leave a stringy residue behind that can get stuck to the printheads and block the tiny nozzles. Dust from the corrugated boxes can be bad too – be sure to regularly clean your packaging equipment and the printheads.

Vibrations

Good quality printing depends on the boxes being transferred smoothly past the printheads. Make sure your conveyor belt runs smoothly and that you are not dropping boxes onto the conveyor where the printheads are mounted. We’ve seen this happen and the results are not always pretty!

Best Practice of All

The best way to get the best labeling or coding for your shipping cases is to connect with your local ID Technology representative. With many years of experience, combined with the case packing, sealing and product handling of ProMach, we are able to help you determine the best solution for all your case coding or labeling needs.

How can ID Technology and ProMach help you meet your objectives for your packaging barcode and coding operations? Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3. You can also email me at dholliday@idtechnology.com. We’ll be sure to get you in touch with an expert, right in your area!

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Replacing images : - ON

Product Handling Considerations for Barcoding on Shipping CasesUsing inkjet printers to add variable information to shipping cases, is increasing in popularity. Using this technique can dramatically reduce the number of pre-printed items that need to be managed and fit into company efforts to increase digitalization and move to a lean workflow.

Here at ID Technology, we have a lot of experience when it comes to installing inkjet systems for printing barcodes, text and graphics onto corrugated cases. We are a founding distributor of the FoxJet ProSeries system and have won the prestigious Regency Award for top FoxJet distributor for 14 consecutive years.

If there is one thing we’ve learned over this time, it’s that having good product handling is as important as having good printing equipment for getting the high-quality, compliant GS1 barcodes that customers demand. If the boxes are not presented consistently and accurately to the printheads, this will show in poor print quality and in particular will not allow high-quality barcodes to be printed.

To help educate users on best practices for product handling, our friends at FoxJet recently produced a detailed whitepaper on this topic that goes over many of the issues that are important to ensure great quality printing every time.

FoxJet ProSeries Printers

The whitepaper the transition from the case taper or sealer to the conveyor where the barcode printers are installed as being an area of crucial importance. Because space is often limited on packaging lines, the printheads often have to be installed very close to the exit of the case sealer. Some important factors are:

Carton Control – Proximity to the Printhead

It is important that after leaving the case sealer, the boxes are correctly presented the correct distance from the printheads. The drops of ink that are fired from the printheads can only travel a short distance while maintaining accuracy. If the box is too far away, print quality will decline and if so close it hits the printhead, damage might occur.

Be sure to control the boxes gently so that the boxes are undamaged as they pass through your packaging processes.

It’s best to use guide rails to accurately control the position of the box and even better use in conjunction with FoxJet’s retracting printhead brackets. This bracket uses a roller allow the printhead to be the correct distance from the box every time.

Product/Conveyor Speed

Ensure that boxes leaving your case sealer are traveling at a speed that is within the limits of your inkjet printer. Our FoxJet ProSeries printheads are able to print high-quality text, barcodes and images at up to 300ft per minute, which is enough for all but the fastest production lines.

Angel Hair

No, we are not talking pasta here! Some case sealing machines use hot melt adhesive to hold the flaps on the boxes closed. At times the adhesive applicators can leave a stringy residue behind that can get stuck to the printheads and block the tiny nozzles. Dust from the corrugated boxes can be bad too – be sure to regularly clean your packaging equipment and the printheads.

Vibrations

Good quality printing depends on the boxes being transferred smoothly past the printheads. Make sure your conveyor belt runs smoothly and that you are not dropping boxes onto the conveyor where the printheads are mounted. We’ve seen this happen and the results are not always pretty!

Best Practice of All

The best way to get the best labeling or coding for your shipping cases is to connect with your local ID Technology representative. With many years of experience, combined with the case packing, sealing and product handling of ProMach, we are able to help you determine the best solution for all your case coding or labeling needs.

How can ID Technology and ProMach help you meet your objectives for your packaging barcode and coding operations? Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3. You can also email me at dholliday@idtechnology.com. We’ll be sure to get you in touch with an expert, right in your area!

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Product Handling Considerations for Barcoding on Shipping CasesUsing inkjet printers to add variable information to shipping cases, is increasing in popularity. Using this technique can dramatically reduce the number of pre-printed items that need to be managed and fit into company efforts to increase digitalization and move to a lean workflow.

Here at ID Technology, we have a lot of experience when it comes to installing inkjet systems for printing barcodes, text and graphics onto corrugated cases. We are a founding distributor of the Product Handling Considerations for Barcoding on Shipping CasesFoxJet ProSeries system and have won the prestigious Regency Award for top FoxJet distributor for 14 consecutive years.

If there is one thing we’ve learned over this time, it’s that having good product handling is as important as having good printing equipment for getting the high-quality, compliant GS1 barcodes that customers demand. If the boxes are not presented consistently and accurately to the printheads, this will show in poor print quality and in particular will not allow high-quality barcodes to be printed.

To help educate users on best practices for product handling, our friends at FoxJet recently produced a detailed whitepaper on this topic that goes over many of the issues that are important to ensure great quality printing every time.

FoxJet ProSeries Printers

The whitepaper the transition from the case taper or sealer to the conveyor where the barcode printers are installed as being an area of crucial importance. Because space is often limited on packaging lines, the printheads often have to be installed very close to the exit of the case sealer. Some important factors are:

Carton Control – Proximity to the Printhead

It is important that after leaving the case sealer, the boxes are correctly presented the correct distance from the printheads. The drops of ink that are fired from the printheads can only travel a short distance while maintaining accuracy. If the box is too far away, print quality will decline and if so close it hits the printhead, damage might occur.

Be sure to control the boxes gently so that the boxes are undamaged as they pass through your packaging processes.

It’s best to use guide rails to accurately control the position of the box and even better use in conjunction with FoxJet’s retracting printhead brackets. This bracket uses a roller allow the printhead to be the correct distance from the box every time.

Product/Conveyor Speed

Ensure that boxes leaving your case sealer are traveling at a speed that is within the limits of your inkjet printer. Our FoxJet ProSeries printheads are able to print high-quality text, barcodes and images at up to 300ft per minute, which is enough for all but the fastest production lines.

Angel Hair

No, we are not talking pasta here! Some case sealing machines use hot melt adhesive to hold the flaps on the boxes closed. At times the adhesive applicators can leave a stringy residue behind that can get stuck to the printheads and block the tiny nozzles. Dust from the corrugated boxes can be bad too – be sure to regularly clean your packaging equipment and the printheads.

Vibrations

Good quality printing depends on the boxes being transferred smoothly past the printheads. Make sure your conveyor belt runs smoothly and that you are not dropping boxes onto the conveyor where the printheads are mounted. We’ve seen this happen and the results are not always pretty!

Best Practice of All

The best way to get the best labeling or coding for your shipping cases is to connect with your local ID Technology representative. With many years of experience, combined with the case packing, sealing and product handling of ProMach, we are able to help you determine the best solution for all your case coding or labeling needs.

How can ID Technology and ProMach help you meet your objectives for your packaging barcode and coding operations? Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3. You can also email me at dholliday@idtechnology.com. We’ll be sure to get you in touch with an expert, right in your area!

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Product Handling Considerations for Barcoding on Shipping CasesUsing inkjet printers to add variable information to shipping cases, is increasing in popularity. Using this technique can dramatically reduce the number of pre-printed items that need to be managed and fit into company efforts to increase digitalization and move to a lean workflow.

Here at ID Technology, we have a lot of experience when it comes to installing inkjet systems for printing barcodes, text and graphics onto corrugated cases. We are a founding distributor of the Product Handling Considerations for Barcoding on Shipping CasesFoxJet ProSeries system and have won the prestigious Regency Award for top FoxJet distributor for 14 consecutive years.

If there is one thing we’ve learned over this time, it’s that having good product handling is as important as having good printing equipment for getting the high-quality, compliant GS1 barcodes that customers demand. If the boxes are not presented consistently and accurately to the printheads, this will show in poor print quality and in particular will not allow high-quality barcodes to be printed.

To help educate users on best practices for product handling, our friends at FoxJet recently produced a detailed whitepaper on this topic that goes over many of the issues that are important to ensure great quality printing every time.

Product Handling Considerations for Barcoding on Shipping Cases

FoxJet ProSeries Printers

The whitepaper the transition from the case taper or sealer to the conveyor where the barcode printers are installed as being an area of crucial importance. Because space is often limited on packaging lines, the printheads often have to be installed very close to the exit of the case sealer. Some important factors are:

Carton Control – Proximity to the Printhead

It is important that after leaving the case sealer, the boxes are correctly presented the correct distance from the printheads. The drops of ink that are fired from the printheads can only travel a short distance while maintaining accuracy. If the box is too far away, print quality will decline and if so close it hits the printhead, damage might occur.

Be sure to control the boxes gently so that the boxes are undamaged as they pass through your packaging processes.

It’s best to use guide rails to accurately control the position of the box and even better use in conjunction with FoxJet’s retracting printhead brackets. This bracket uses a roller allow the printhead to be the correct distance from the box every time.

Product/Conveyor Speed

Ensure that boxes leaving your case sealer are traveling at a speed that is within the limits of your inkjet printer. Our FoxJet ProSeries printheads are able to print high-quality text, barcodes and images at up to 300ft per minute, which is enough for all but the fastest production lines.

Angel Hair

No, we are not talking pasta here! Some case sealing machines use hot melt adhesive to hold the flaps on the boxes closed. At times the adhesive applicators can leave a stringy residue behind that can get stuck to the printheads and block the tiny nozzles. Dust from the corrugated boxes can be bad too – be sure to regularly clean your packaging equipment and the printheads.

Vibrations

Good quality printing depends on the boxes being transferred smoothly past the printheads. Make sure your conveyor belt runs smoothly and that you are not dropping boxes onto the conveyor where the printheads are mounted. We’ve seen this happen and the results are not always pretty!

Best Practice of All

The best way to get the best labeling or coding for your shipping cases is to connect with your local ID Technology representative. With many years of experience, combined with the case packing, sealing and product handling of ProMach, we are able to help you determine the best solution for all your case coding or labeling needs.

How can ID Technology and ProMach help you meet your objectives for your packaging barcode and coding operations? Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3. You can also email me at dholliday@idtechnology.com. We’ll be sure to get you in touch with an expert, right in your area!

[post_excerpt] => Using inkjet printers to add variable information to shipping cases, is increasing in popularity. Using this technique can dramatically reduce the number of pre-printed items that need to be managed and fit into company efforts to increase digitalization and move to a lean workflow. Here at ID Technology, we have a lot of experience when […] [post_date_gmt] => 2019-06-18 21:03:04 [post_date] => 2019-06-18 21:03:04 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-06-18 21:03:04 [post_modified] => 2019-06-18 21:03:04 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => http://www.labelingnews.com/?p=5937 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Labeling News [syndication_source_uri] => http://www.labelingnews.com [syndication_source_id] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed_id] => 12 [syndication_permalink] => http://www.labelingnews.com/2019/06/product-handling-considerations-for-barcoding-on-shipping-cases/ [syndication_item_hash] => 380c6e3d4f6ebf63ea44ce5e8d7bf988 [faf_featured_image] => 0 [faf_process_image] => 0,0,0 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 1625 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )


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Barcodes – Validation vs Verification in GS1

Array ( [post_title] => Barcodes – Validation vs Verification in GS1 [post_content] =>

Verify or Validate Your GS1 Barcodes?

When talking about ensuring barcodes are correct, many people use the words validation and verification as though they are interchangeable – this is something that is not correct. Many companies that should know better promote their barcode reading systems as verifying barcodes when they are actually validating.

Validating and verifying a barcode are two separate processes, each being important to ensuring that barcodes used on products and packaging are correctly encoded with the right data and that the quality is of an acceptable level.
Barcodes are very important in many industries. Whether used to identify a product in a retail store, a shipping case traveling through a logistics supply chain, or on an important component used in aerospace, each barcode should contain the right data (encoded in the appropriate format) and also be guaranteed to be read with an appropriate barcode scanner.
If you are printing or using barcodes within the GS1 system, every application has rules concerning how the data is encoded and the minimum barcode quality standards. Some organizations demand that their vendors meet the GS1 quality standards (or sometimes exceed them) and failure to do so can result in very expensive chargebacks for non-compliance.
Let’s look more closely at Validation and Verification for linear barcodes – we’ll discuss 2D barcodes in a future article.
Barcode Validation vs Verification

Barcode Validation

Barcode Validation is all about ensuring the barcode actually scans and that the format of the data is correct for the application in question. As mentioned above, Validation is like spelling and it is easy to do – in most cases, we can validate barcodes with our smartphones. Here’s a quick example:
Validation or Verification for barcodes

This is a very common barcode – a GS1 128 code that is encoded with a GTIN and a lot (or batch) number. Using the Barcode Check app on my phone I can get a very helpful validation report:

GS1 128 barcode Validation Report - smartphone

This is really useful because it shows me that my barcode meets the GS1 encoding spec and it confirms that the GTIN and lot number are correctly identified. This app also produces a report that can be saved or emailed.

While this is all very good – and I use this and similar apps all the time – validating the barcode does not show that it meets the GS1 or any other quality standard. It certainly won’t help when your large customer tells you that although your barcodes scan ok, they are not meeting the GS1 quality criteria. To ensure barcode quality, it is important to have a program in place to actually verify that your barcodes are meeting the quality standard.

Barcode Verification

For GS1 applications, there are clearly defined quality standards for each type of barcode that is allowed for that application.

As an example, here are the common barcodes GS1 allows for use in General Distribution (that don’t need to be scanned at POS):

GS1 Barcodes General Distribution

Barcodes for General Distribution (Click for larger version)

I’ve left out a few of the allowed barcodes (the GS1 Databar codes) to keep the table size manageable – in my experience, most barcodes used in distribution (at least in North America) are ITF-14 and GS1-128, with UPC from time to time. Note that currently (late 2018), only linear barcodes are approved for these distribution applications.

As well as specifying barcode symbols the table also shows the maximum and minimum sizes for the barcode x-dimension (width of the smallest bars) and height, as well as the minimum quiet zone (clear space) that needs to be positioned at each end of the barcode. The final column in the table specifies the minimum quality specification that the barcode is required to meet – in each case, it is defined as 1.5/10/660. In the remainder of this article, we’ll look at what these numbers mean.

1.5/10/660

In the GS1 system, linear barcodes are verified against the ISO/IEC 15426-1 standard.

The standard grades a number of the barcode parameters and returns a single score – in the case of the GS1 distribution barcodes (with one exception) that score is 1.5.

The verification process inspects a number of parameters and assigns each one a grade between 0.0 and 4.0.

The standard recommends that 10 scans are completed for each parameter (across different parts of the symbol) and the score for that parameter is the average of the 10.

The lowest score for any one of the parameters is the overall score for that symbol – it is rounded to one decimal place.

In our GS1 example, the 1.5 represents the minimum passing score the symbol must achieve.

Aperture & Wavelength of Verification Device.

When verifying a barcode, the resolution of the inspecting device as well as the lighting in the area can have an effect on the results obtained.

In an effort to standardize the testing as much as possible, GS1 specifies two testing parameters.

GS1 Webinar

Recently I did a short webinar on validation and verification with SATO America and GS1 – check it out!

An Exception to the Rule.

After all this attempt at standardization, there is an exception included in the GS1 specification.

When printing directly onto brown corrugated (using technologies such as inkjet, or flexo), the lack of contrast between the bars and the brown background material causes the verification score to be reduced and the 1.5 target to be unobtainable.

GS1 takes this into account by making the following statement: “For ITF-14 symbols printed on labels with off-set, thermal, or laser print with an X-dimension 0.495 millimetre (0.0195 inch), the minimum quality specification is 1.5/10/660. For ITF-14 symbols printed directly on corrugate or labels with an X-dimension greater than or equal to 0.635 millimetre (0.0250 inch), the minimum quality specification is 0.5/20/660”.

So our customers using FoxJet ProSeries printers to print the ITF-14 barcode on cases can verify against the less stringent target, as long as the x-dimension is is above 25 mils.

Why Go Through All This?

Obviously, the use of auto-identification of items in supply chains using barcodes depends on the codes being readable at every step. The use of the GS1 standards ensures that barcodes are printed consistently and anyone using barcode scanners that meet the same requirements should be able to read them with no problems – regardless of whether they are using brand new imaging scanners or have 20-year-old laser scanners in a warehouse.

For anyone shipping barcoded packaging, verification is the only way to know for sure the barcode is correct and that it will be readable.

I had a great example of this just yesterday – a label printed on one of our own labeling systems included a UPC code. I didn’t have a verifier handy or even an industrial scanner – just my trusty phone. I scanned the barcode with two reliable apps – one would read it easily, one not at all. Did my barcode meet the GS1 requirement? I have no idea! This wasn’t for a production job so not a big deal. On the other hand, if you are using barcodes for your product or secondary packaging, you never want to be in that uncertain position.

Want to Learn More?

If you want to learn more about the various barcodes and how they are used in the GS1 system, you can download our GS1 Barcode Intro. Also, our ID Technology team is always ready to help you make sure that you labeling and barcode operations meet all your customer’s and GS1 requirements. Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3 or contact David Holliday at dholliday@idtechnology.com. We can help you sort through the details and be on your way to labeling and coding your products with confidence.

 

 

[post_excerpt] => When talking about ensuring barcodes are correct, many people use the words validation and verification as though they are interchangeable – this is something that is not correct. Many companies that should know better promote their barcode reading systems as verifying barcodes when they are actually validating. Validating and verifying a barcode are two separate […] [post_date_gmt] => 2018-11-28 21:10:02 [post_date] => 2018-11-28 21:10:02 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-11-28 21:10:02 [post_modified] => 2018-11-28 21:10:02 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => http://www.labelingnews.com/?p=5858 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Labeling News [syndication_source_uri] => http://www.labelingnews.com [syndication_source_id] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed_id] => 12 [syndication_permalink] => http://www.labelingnews.com/2018/11/barcodes-validation-vs-verification-in-gs1/ [syndication_item_hash] => Array ( [0] => 471bca0137552ba529b75823f80406b3 [1] => d427dd21c74300b34cd718ded638fb80 [2] => fe0ea45a417e2614663f9f6661343c34 [3] => a1d27a229a92d080c27ab655cadfdd00 [4] => 2aa562a6d75c8b4c32e9fa243413c834 ) ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 1625 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) [post_name] => barcodes-validation-vs-verification-in-gs1 )

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Replacing images : Verify or Validate Your GS1 Barcodes? - Verify or Validate Your GS1 Barcodes? ON

Verify or Validate Your GS1 Barcodes?

When talking about ensuring barcodes are correct, many people use the words validation and verification as though they are interchangeable – this is something that is not correct. Many companies that should know better promote their barcode reading systems as verifying barcodes when they are actually validating.

Validating and verifying a barcode are two separate processes, each being important to ensuring that barcodes used on products and packaging are correctly encoded with the right data and that the quality is of an acceptable level.
Barcodes are very important in many industries. Whether used to identify a product in a retail store, a shipping case traveling through a logistics supply chain, or on an important component used in aerospace, each barcode should contain the right data (encoded in the appropriate format) and also be guaranteed to be read with an appropriate barcode scanner.
If you are printing or using barcodes within the GS1 system, every application has rules concerning how the data is encoded and the minimum barcode quality standards. Some organizations demand that their vendors meet the GS1 quality standards (or sometimes exceed them) and failure to do so can result in very expensive chargebacks for non-compliance.
Let’s look more closely at Validation and Verification for linear barcodes – we’ll discuss 2D barcodes in a future article.
Barcode Validation vs Verification

Barcode Validation

Barcode Validation is all about ensuring the barcode actually scans and that the format of the data is correct for the application in question. As mentioned above, Validation is like spelling and it is easy to do – in most cases, we can validate barcodes with our smartphones. Here’s a quick example:
Validation or Verification for barcodes

This is a very common barcode – a GS1 128 code that is encoded with a GTIN and a lot (or batch) number. Using the Barcode Check app on my phone I can get a very helpful validation report:

GS1 128 barcode Validation Report - smartphone

This is really useful because it shows me that my barcode meets the GS1 encoding spec and it confirms that the GTIN and lot number are correctly identified. This app also produces a report that can be saved or emailed.

While this is all very good – and I use this and similar apps all the time – validating the barcode does not show that it meets the GS1 or any other quality standard. It certainly won’t help when your large customer tells you that although your barcodes scan ok, they are not meeting the GS1 quality criteria. To ensure barcode quality, it is important to have a program in place to actually verify that your barcodes are meeting the quality standard.

Barcode Verification

For GS1 applications, there are clearly defined quality standards for each type of barcode that is allowed for that application.

As an example, here are the common barcodes GS1 allows for use in General Distribution (that don’t need to be scanned at POS):

GS1 Barcodes General Distribution

Barcodes for General Distribution (Click for larger version)

I’ve left out a few of the allowed barcodes (the GS1 Databar codes) to keep the table size manageable – in my experience, most barcodes used in distribution (at least in North America) are ITF-14 and GS1-128, with UPC from time to time. Note that currently (late 2018), only linear barcodes are approved for these distribution applications.

As well as specifying barcode symbols the table also shows the maximum and minimum sizes for the barcode x-dimension (width of the smallest bars) and height, as well as the minimum quiet zone (clear space) that needs to be positioned at each end of the barcode. The final column in the table specifies the minimum quality specification that the barcode is required to meet – in each case, it is defined as 1.5/10/660. In the remainder of this article, we’ll look at what these numbers mean.

1.5/10/660

In the GS1 system, linear barcodes are verified against the ISO/IEC 15426-1 standard.

The standard grades a number of the barcode parameters and returns a single score – in the case of the GS1 distribution barcodes (with one exception) that score is 1.5.

The verification process inspects a number of parameters and assigns each one a grade between 0.0 and 4.0.

The standard recommends that 10 scans are completed for each parameter (across different parts of the symbol) and the score for that parameter is the average of the 10.

The lowest score for any one of the parameters is the overall score for that symbol – it is rounded to one decimal place.

In our GS1 example, the 1.5 represents the minimum passing score the symbol must achieve.

Aperture & Wavelength of Verification Device.

When verifying a barcode, the resolution of the inspecting device as well as the lighting in the area can have an effect on the results obtained.

In an effort to standardize the testing as much as possible, GS1 specifies two testing parameters.

GS1 Webinar

Recently I did a short webinar on validation and verification with SATO America and GS1 – check it out!

An Exception to the Rule.

After all this attempt at standardization, there is an exception included in the GS1 specification.

When printing directly onto brown corrugated (using technologies such as inkjet, or flexo), the lack of contrast between the bars and the brown background material causes the verification score to be reduced and the 1.5 target to be unobtainable.

GS1 takes this into account by making the following statement: “For ITF-14 symbols printed on labels with off-set, thermal, or laser print with an X-dimension 0.495 millimetre (0.0195 inch), the minimum quality specification is 1.5/10/660. For ITF-14 symbols printed directly on corrugate or labels with an X-dimension greater than or equal to 0.635 millimetre (0.0250 inch), the minimum quality specification is 0.5/20/660”.

So our customers using FoxJet ProSeries printers to print the ITF-14 barcode on cases can verify against the less stringent target, as long as the x-dimension is is above 25 mils.

Why Go Through All This?

Obviously, the use of auto-identification of items in supply chains using barcodes depends on the codes being readable at every step. The use of the GS1 standards ensures that barcodes are printed consistently and anyone using barcode scanners that meet the same requirements should be able to read them with no problems – regardless of whether they are using brand new imaging scanners or have 20-year-old laser scanners in a warehouse.

For anyone shipping barcoded packaging, verification is the only way to know for sure the barcode is correct and that it will be readable.

I had a great example of this just yesterday – a label printed on one of our own labeling systems included a UPC code. I didn’t have a verifier handy or even an industrial scanner – just my trusty phone. I scanned the barcode with two reliable apps – one would read it easily, one not at all. Did my barcode meet the GS1 requirement? I have no idea! This wasn’t for a production job so not a big deal. On the other hand, if you are using barcodes for your product or secondary packaging, you never want to be in that uncertain position.

Want to Learn More?

If you want to learn more about the various barcodes and how they are used in the GS1 system, you can download our GS1 Barcode Intro. Also, our ID Technology team is always ready to help you make sure that you labeling and barcode operations meet all your customer’s and GS1 requirements. Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3 or contact David Holliday at dholliday@idtechnology.com. We can help you sort through the details and be on your way to labeling and coding your products with confidence.

 

 

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Barcodes – Validation vs Verification in GS1

When talking about ensuring barcodes are correct, many people use the words validation and verification as though they are interchangeable – this is something that is not correct. Many companies that should know better promote their barcode reading systems as verifying barcodes when they are actually validating.

Validating and verifying a barcode are two separate processes, each being important to ensuring that barcodes used on products and packaging are correctly encoded with the right data and that the quality is of an acceptable level.
Barcodes are very important in many industries. Whether used to identify a product in a retail store, a shipping case traveling through a logistics supply chain, or on an important component used in aerospace, each barcode should contain the right data (encoded in the appropriate format) and also be guaranteed to be read with an appropriate barcode scanner.
If you are printing or using barcodes within the GS1 system, every application has rules concerning how the data is encoded and the minimum barcode quality standards. Some organizations demand that their vendors meet the GS1 quality standards (or sometimes exceed them) and failure to do so can result in very expensive chargebacks for non-compliance.
Let’s look more closely at Validation and Verification for linear barcodes – we’ll discuss 2D barcodes in a future article.
Barcode Validation vs Verification

Barcode Validation

Barcode Validation is all about ensuring the barcode actually scans and that the format of the data is correct for the application in question. As mentioned above, Validation is like spelling and it is easy to do – in most cases, we can validate barcodes with our smartphones. Here’s a quick example:
Validation or Verification for barcodes

This is a very common barcode – a GS1 128 code that is encoded with a GTIN and a lot (or batch) number. Using the Barcode Check app on my phone I can get a very helpful validation report:

GS1 128 barcode Validation Report - smartphone

This is really useful because it shows me that my barcode meets the GS1 encoding spec and it confirms that the GTIN and lot number are correctly identified. This app also produces a report that can be saved or emailed.

While this is all very good – and I use this and similar apps all the time – validating the barcode does not show that it meets the GS1 or any other quality standard. It certainly won’t help when your large customer tells you that although your barcodes scan ok, they are not meeting the GS1 quality criteria. To ensure barcode quality, it is important to have a program in place to actually verify that your barcodes are meeting the quality standard.

Barcode Verification

For GS1 applications, there are clearly defined quality standards for each type of barcode that is allowed for that application.

As an example, here are the common barcodes GS1 allows for use in General Distribution (that don’t need to be scanned at POS):

GS1 Barcodes General Distribution

Barcodes for General Distribution (Click for larger version)

I’ve left out a few of the allowed barcodes (the GS1 Databar codes) to keep the table size manageable – in my experience, most barcodes used in distribution (at least in North America) are ITF-14 and GS1-128, with UPC from time to time. Note that currently (late 2018), only linear barcodes are approved for these distribution applications.

As well as specifying barcode symbols the table also shows the maximum and minimum sizes for the barcode x-dimension (width of the smallest bars) and height, as well as the minimum quiet zone (clear space) that needs to be positioned at each end of the barcode. The final column in the table specifies the minimum quality specification that the barcode is required to meet – in each case, it is defined as 1.5/10/660. In the remainder of this article, we’ll look at what these numbers mean.

1.5/10/660

In the GS1 system, linear barcodes are verified against the ISO/IEC 15426-1 standard.

The standard grades a number of the barcode parameters and returns a single score – in the case of the GS1 distribution barcodes (with one exception) that score is 1.5.

The verification process inspects a number of parameters and assigns each one a grade between 0.0 and 4.0.

The standard recommends that 10 scans are completed for each parameter (across different parts of the symbol) and the score for that parameter is the average of the 10.

The lowest score for any one of the parameters is the overall score for that symbol – it is rounded to one decimal place.

In our GS1 example, the 1.5 represents the minimum passing score the symbol must achieve.

Aperture & Wavelength of Verification Device.

When verifying a barcode, the resolution of the inspecting device as well as the lighting in the area can have an effect on the results obtained.

In an effort to standardize the testing as much as possible, GS1 specifies two testing parameters.

GS1 Webinar

Recently I did a short webinar on validation and verification with SATO America and GS1 – check it out!

An Exception to the Rule.

After all this attempt at standardization, there is an exception included in the GS1 specification.

When printing directly onto brown corrugated (using technologies such as inkjet, or flexo), the lack of contrast between the bars and the brown background material causes the verification score to be reduced and the 1.5 target to be unobtainable.

GS1 takes this into account by making the following statement: “For ITF-14 symbols printed on labels with off-set, thermal, or laser print with an X-dimension 0.495 millimetre (0.0195 inch), the minimum quality specification is 1.5/10/660. For ITF-14 symbols printed directly on corrugate or labels with an X-dimension greater than or equal to 0.635 millimetre (0.0250 inch), the minimum quality specification is 0.5/20/660”.

So our customers using FoxJet ProSeries printers to print the ITF-14 barcode on cases can verify against the less stringent target, as long as the x-dimension is is above 25 mils.

Why Go Through All This?

Obviously, the use of auto-identification of items in supply chains using barcodes depends on the codes being readable at every step. The use of the GS1 standards ensures that barcodes are printed consistently and anyone using barcode scanners that meet the same requirements should be able to read them with no problems – regardless of whether they are using brand new imaging scanners or have 20-year-old laser scanners in a warehouse.

For anyone shipping barcoded packaging, verification is the only way to know for sure the barcode is correct and that it will be readable.

I had a great example of this just yesterday – a label printed on one of our own labeling systems included a UPC code. I didn’t have a verifier handy or even an industrial scanner – just my trusty phone. I scanned the barcode with two reliable apps – one would read it easily, one not at all. Did my barcode meet the GS1 requirement? I have no idea! This wasn’t for a production job so not a big deal. On the other hand, if you are using barcodes for your product or secondary packaging, you never want to be in that uncertain position.

Want to Learn More?

If you want to learn more about the various barcodes and how they are used in the GS1 system, you can download our GS1 Barcode Intro. Also, our ID Technology team is always ready to help you make sure that you labeling and barcode operations meet all your customer’s and GS1 requirements. Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3 or contact David Holliday at dholliday@idtechnology.com. We can help you sort through the details and be on your way to labeling and coding your products with confidence.

 

 

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Barcodes – Validation vs Verification in GS1

When talking about ensuring barcodes are correct, many people use the words validation and verification as though they are interchangeable – this is something that is not correct. Many companies that should know better promote their barcode reading systems as verifying barcodes when they are actually validating.

Validating and verifying a barcode are two separate processes, each being important to ensuring that barcodes used on products and packaging are correctly encoded with the right data and that the quality is of an acceptable level.
Barcodes are very important in many industries. Whether used to identify a product in a retail store, a shipping case traveling through a logistics supply chain, or on an important component used in aerospace, each barcode should contain the right data (encoded in the appropriate format) and also be guaranteed to be read with an appropriate barcode scanner.
If you are printing or using barcodes within the GS1 system, every application has rules concerning how the data is encoded and the minimum barcode quality standards. Some organizations demand that their vendors meet the GS1 quality standards (or sometimes exceed them) and failure to do so can result in very expensive chargebacks for non-compliance.
Let’s look more closely at Validation and Verification for linear barcodes – we’ll discuss 2D barcodes in a future article.
Barcodes – Validation vs Verification in GS1

Barcode Validation

Barcode Validation is all about ensuring the barcode actually scans and that the format of the data is correct for the application in question. As mentioned above, Validation is like spelling and it is easy to do – in most cases, we can validate barcodes with our smartphones. Here’s a quick example:
Validation or Verification for barcodes

This is a very common barcode – a GS1 128 code that is encoded with a GTIN and a lot (or batch) number. Using the Barcode Check app on my phone I can get a very helpful validation report:

GS1 128 barcode Validation Report - smartphone

This is really useful because it shows me that my barcode meets the GS1 encoding spec and it confirms that the GTIN and lot number are correctly identified. This app also produces a report that can be saved or emailed.

While this is all very good – and I use this and similar apps all the time – validating the barcode does not show that it meets the GS1 or any other quality standard. It certainly won’t help when your large customer tells you that although your barcodes scan ok, they are not meeting the GS1 quality criteria. To ensure barcode quality, it is important to have a program in place to actually verify that your barcodes are meeting the quality standard.

Barcode Verification

For GS1 applications, there are clearly defined quality standards for each type of barcode that is allowed for that application.

As an example, here are the common barcodes GS1 allows for use in General Distribution (that don’t need to be scanned at POS):

GS1 Barcodes General Distribution

Barcodes for General Distribution (Click for larger version)

I’ve left out a few of the allowed barcodes (the GS1 Databar codes) to keep the table size manageable – in my experience, most barcodes used in distribution (at least in North America) are ITF-14 and GS1-128, with UPC from time to time. Note that currently (late 2018), only linear barcodes are approved for these distribution applications.

As well as specifying barcode symbols the table also shows the maximum and minimum sizes for the barcode x-dimension (width of the smallest bars) and height, as well as the minimum quiet zone (clear space) that needs to be positioned at each end of the barcode. The final column in the table specifies the minimum quality specification that the barcode is required to meet – in each case, it is defined as 1.5/10/660. In the remainder of this article, we’ll look at what these numbers mean.

1.5/10/660

In the GS1 system, linear barcodes are verified against the ISO/IEC 15426-1 standard.

The standard grades a number of the barcode parameters and returns a single score – in the case of the GS1 distribution barcodes (with one exception) that score is 1.5.

The verification process inspects a number of parameters and assigns each one a grade between 0.0 and 4.0.

The standard recommends that 10 scans are completed for each parameter (across different parts of the symbol) and the score for that parameter is the average of the 10.

The lowest score for any one of the parameters is the overall score for that symbol – it is rounded to one decimal place.

In our GS1 example, the 1.5 represents the minimum passing score the symbol must achieve.

Aperture & Wavelength of Verification Device.

When verifying a barcode, the resolution of the inspecting device as well as the lighting in the area can have an effect on the results obtained.

In an effort to standardize the testing as much as possible, GS1 specifies two testing parameters.

GS1 Webinar

Recently I did a short webinar on validation and verification with SATO America and GS1 – check it out!

An Exception to the Rule.

After all this attempt at standardization, there is an exception included in the GS1 specification.

When printing directly onto brown corrugated (using technologies such as inkjet, or flexo), the lack of contrast between the bars and the brown background material causes the verification score to be reduced and the 1.5 target to be unobtainable.

GS1 takes this into account by making the following statement: “For ITF-14 symbols printed on labels with off-set, thermal, or laser print with an X-dimension 0.495 millimetre (0.0195 inch), the minimum quality specification is 1.5/10/660. For ITF-14 symbols printed directly on corrugate or labels with an X-dimension greater than or equal to 0.635 millimetre (0.0250 inch), the minimum quality specification is 0.5/20/660”.

So our customers using FoxJet ProSeries printers to print the ITF-14 barcode on cases can verify against the less stringent target, as long as the x-dimension is is above 25 mils.

Why Go Through All This?

Obviously, the use of auto-identification of items in supply chains using barcodes depends on the codes being readable at every step. The use of the GS1 standards ensures that barcodes are printed consistently and anyone using barcode scanners that meet the same requirements should be able to read them with no problems – regardless of whether they are using brand new imaging scanners or have 20-year-old laser scanners in a warehouse.

For anyone shipping barcoded packaging, verification is the only way to know for sure the barcode is correct and that it will be readable.

I had a great example of this just yesterday – a label printed on one of our own labeling systems included a UPC code. I didn’t have a verifier handy or even an industrial scanner – just my trusty phone. I scanned the barcode with two reliable apps – one would read it easily, one not at all. Did my barcode meet the GS1 requirement? I have no idea! This wasn’t for a production job so not a big deal. On the other hand, if you are using barcodes for your product or secondary packaging, you never want to be in that uncertain position.

Want to Learn More?

If you want to learn more about the various barcodes and how they are used in the GS1 system, you can download our GS1 Barcode Intro. Also, our ID Technology team is always ready to help you make sure that you labeling and barcode operations meet all your customer’s and GS1 requirements. Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3 or contact David Holliday at dholliday@idtechnology.com. We can help you sort through the details and be on your way to labeling and coding your products with confidence.

 

 

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Barcodes – Validation vs Verification in GS1

When talking about ensuring barcodes are correct, many people use the words validation and verification as though they are interchangeable – this is something that is not correct. Many companies that should know better promote their barcode reading systems as verifying barcodes when they are actually validating.

Validating and verifying a barcode are two separate processes, each being important to ensuring that barcodes used on products and packaging are correctly encoded with the right data and that the quality is of an acceptable level.
Barcodes are very important in many industries. Whether used to identify a product in a retail store, a shipping case traveling through a logistics supply chain, or on an important component used in aerospace, each barcode should contain the right data (encoded in the appropriate format) and also be guaranteed to be read with an appropriate barcode scanner.
If you are printing or using barcodes within the GS1 system, every application has rules concerning how the data is encoded and the minimum barcode quality standards. Some organizations demand that their vendors meet the GS1 quality standards (or sometimes exceed them) and failure to do so can result in very expensive chargebacks for non-compliance.
Let’s look more closely at Validation and Verification for linear barcodes – we’ll discuss 2D barcodes in a future article.
Barcodes – Validation vs Verification in GS1

Barcode Validation

Barcode Validation is all about ensuring the barcode actually scans and that the format of the data is correct for the application in question. As mentioned above, Validation is like spelling and it is easy to do – in most cases, we can validate barcodes with our smartphones. Here’s a quick example:
Barcodes – Validation vs Verification in GS1

This is a very common barcode – a GS1 128 code that is encoded with a GTIN and a lot (or batch) number. Using the Barcode Check app on my phone I can get a very helpful validation report:

GS1 128 barcode Validation Report - smartphone

This is really useful because it shows me that my barcode meets the GS1 encoding spec and it confirms that the GTIN and lot number are correctly identified. This app also produces a report that can be saved or emailed.

While this is all very good – and I use this and similar apps all the time – validating the barcode does not show that it meets the GS1 or any other quality standard. It certainly won’t help when your large customer tells you that although your barcodes scan ok, they are not meeting the GS1 quality criteria. To ensure barcode quality, it is important to have a program in place to actually verify that your barcodes are meeting the quality standard.

Barcode Verification

For GS1 applications, there are clearly defined quality standards for each type of barcode that is allowed for that application.

As an example, here are the common barcodes GS1 allows for use in General Distribution (that don’t need to be scanned at POS):

GS1 Barcodes General Distribution

Barcodes for General Distribution (Click for larger version)

I’ve left out a few of the allowed barcodes (the GS1 Databar codes) to keep the table size manageable – in my experience, most barcodes used in distribution (at least in North America) are ITF-14 and GS1-128, with UPC from time to time. Note that currently (late 2018), only linear barcodes are approved for these distribution applications.

As well as specifying barcode symbols the table also shows the maximum and minimum sizes for the barcode x-dimension (width of the smallest bars) and height, as well as the minimum quiet zone (clear space) that needs to be positioned at each end of the barcode. The final column in the table specifies the minimum quality specification that the barcode is required to meet – in each case, it is defined as 1.5/10/660. In the remainder of this article, we’ll look at what these numbers mean.

1.5/10/660

In the GS1 system, linear barcodes are verified against the ISO/IEC 15426-1 standard.

The standard grades a number of the barcode parameters and returns a single score – in the case of the GS1 distribution barcodes (with one exception) that score is 1.5.

The verification process inspects a number of parameters and assigns each one a grade between 0.0 and 4.0.

The standard recommends that 10 scans are completed for each parameter (across different parts of the symbol) and the score for that parameter is the average of the 10.

The lowest score for any one of the parameters is the overall score for that symbol – it is rounded to one decimal place.

In our GS1 example, the 1.5 represents the minimum passing score the symbol must achieve.

Aperture & Wavelength of Verification Device.

When verifying a barcode, the resolution of the inspecting device as well as the lighting in the area can have an effect on the results obtained.

In an effort to standardize the testing as much as possible, GS1 specifies two testing parameters.

GS1 Webinar

Recently I did a short webinar on validation and verification with SATO America and GS1 – check it out!

An Exception to the Rule.

After all this attempt at standardization, there is an exception included in the GS1 specification.

When printing directly onto brown corrugated (using technologies such as inkjet, or flexo), the lack of contrast between the bars and the brown background material causes the verification score to be reduced and the 1.5 target to be unobtainable.

GS1 takes this into account by making the following statement: “For ITF-14 symbols printed on labels with off-set, thermal, or laser print with an X-dimension 0.495 millimetre (0.0195 inch), the minimum quality specification is 1.5/10/660. For ITF-14 symbols printed directly on corrugate or labels with an X-dimension greater than or equal to 0.635 millimetre (0.0250 inch), the minimum quality specification is 0.5/20/660”.

So our customers using FoxJet ProSeries printers to print the ITF-14 barcode on cases can verify against the less stringent target, as long as the x-dimension is is above 25 mils.

Why Go Through All This?

Obviously, the use of auto-identification of items in supply chains using barcodes depends on the codes being readable at every step. The use of the GS1 standards ensures that barcodes are printed consistently and anyone using barcode scanners that meet the same requirements should be able to read them with no problems – regardless of whether they are using brand new imaging scanners or have 20-year-old laser scanners in a warehouse.

For anyone shipping barcoded packaging, verification is the only way to know for sure the barcode is correct and that it will be readable.

I had a great example of this just yesterday – a label printed on one of our own labeling systems included a UPC code. I didn’t have a verifier handy or even an industrial scanner – just my trusty phone. I scanned the barcode with two reliable apps – one would read it easily, one not at all. Did my barcode meet the GS1 requirement? I have no idea! This wasn’t for a production job so not a big deal. On the other hand, if you are using barcodes for your product or secondary packaging, you never want to be in that uncertain position.

Want to Learn More?

If you want to learn more about the various barcodes and how they are used in the GS1 system, you can download our GS1 Barcode Intro. Also, our ID Technology team is always ready to help you make sure that you labeling and barcode operations meet all your customer’s and GS1 requirements. Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3 or contact David Holliday at dholliday@idtechnology.com. We can help you sort through the details and be on your way to labeling and coding your products with confidence.

 

 

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Barcodes – Validation vs Verification in GS1

When talking about ensuring barcodes are correct, many people use the words validation and verification as though they are interchangeable – this is something that is not correct. Many companies that should know better promote their barcode reading systems as verifying barcodes when they are actually validating.

Validating and verifying a barcode are two separate processes, each being important to ensuring that barcodes used on products and packaging are correctly encoded with the right data and that the quality is of an acceptable level.
Barcodes are very important in many industries. Whether used to identify a product in a retail store, a shipping case traveling through a logistics supply chain, or on an important component used in aerospace, each barcode should contain the right data (encoded in the appropriate format) and also be guaranteed to be read with an appropriate barcode scanner.
If you are printing or using barcodes within the GS1 system, every application has rules concerning how the data is encoded and the minimum barcode quality standards. Some organizations demand that their vendors meet the GS1 quality standards (or sometimes exceed them) and failure to do so can result in very expensive chargebacks for non-compliance.
Let’s look more closely at Validation and Verification for linear barcodes – we’ll discuss 2D barcodes in a future article.
Barcodes – Validation vs Verification in GS1

Barcode Validation

Barcode Validation is all about ensuring the barcode actually scans and that the format of the data is correct for the application in question. As mentioned above, Validation is like spelling and it is easy to do – in most cases, we can validate barcodes with our smartphones. Here’s a quick example:
Barcodes – Validation vs Verification in GS1

This is a very common barcode – a GS1 128 code that is encoded with a GTIN and a lot (or batch) number. Using the Barcode Check app on my phone I can get a very helpful validation report:

Barcodes – Validation vs Verification in GS1

This is really useful because it shows me that my barcode meets the GS1 encoding spec and it confirms that the GTIN and lot number are correctly identified. This app also produces a report that can be saved or emailed.

While this is all very good – and I use this and similar apps all the time – validating the barcode does not show that it meets the GS1 or any other quality standard. It certainly won’t help when your large customer tells you that although your barcodes scan ok, they are not meeting the GS1 quality criteria. To ensure barcode quality, it is important to have a program in place to actually verify that your barcodes are meeting the quality standard.

Barcode Verification

For GS1 applications, there are clearly defined quality standards for each type of barcode that is allowed for that application.

As an example, here are the common barcodes GS1 allows for use in General Distribution (that don’t need to be scanned at POS):

GS1 Barcodes General Distribution

Barcodes for General Distribution (Click for larger version)

I’ve left out a few of the allowed barcodes (the GS1 Databar codes) to keep the table size manageable – in my experience, most barcodes used in distribution (at least in North America) are ITF-14 and GS1-128, with UPC from time to time. Note that currently (late 2018), only linear barcodes are approved for these distribution applications.

As well as specifying barcode symbols the table also shows the maximum and minimum sizes for the barcode x-dimension (width of the smallest bars) and height, as well as the minimum quiet zone (clear space) that needs to be positioned at each end of the barcode. The final column in the table specifies the minimum quality specification that the barcode is required to meet – in each case, it is defined as 1.5/10/660. In the remainder of this article, we’ll look at what these numbers mean.

1.5/10/660

In the GS1 system, linear barcodes are verified against the ISO/IEC 15426-1 standard.

The standard grades a number of the barcode parameters and returns a single score – in the case of the GS1 distribution barcodes (with one exception) that score is 1.5.

The verification process inspects a number of parameters and assigns each one a grade between 0.0 and 4.0.

The standard recommends that 10 scans are completed for each parameter (across different parts of the symbol) and the score for that parameter is the average of the 10.

The lowest score for any one of the parameters is the overall score for that symbol – it is rounded to one decimal place.

In our GS1 example, the 1.5 represents the minimum passing score the symbol must achieve.

Aperture & Wavelength of Verification Device.

When verifying a barcode, the resolution of the inspecting device as well as the lighting in the area can have an effect on the results obtained.

In an effort to standardize the testing as much as possible, GS1 specifies two testing parameters.

GS1 Webinar

Recently I did a short webinar on validation and verification with SATO America and GS1 – check it out!

An Exception to the Rule.

After all this attempt at standardization, there is an exception included in the GS1 specification.

When printing directly onto brown corrugated (using technologies such as inkjet, or flexo), the lack of contrast between the bars and the brown background material causes the verification score to be reduced and the 1.5 target to be unobtainable.

GS1 takes this into account by making the following statement: “For ITF-14 symbols printed on labels with off-set, thermal, or laser print with an X-dimension 0.495 millimetre (0.0195 inch), the minimum quality specification is 1.5/10/660. For ITF-14 symbols printed directly on corrugate or labels with an X-dimension greater than or equal to 0.635 millimetre (0.0250 inch), the minimum quality specification is 0.5/20/660”.

So our customers using FoxJet ProSeries printers to print the ITF-14 barcode on cases can verify against the less stringent target, as long as the x-dimension is is above 25 mils.

Why Go Through All This?

Obviously, the use of auto-identification of items in supply chains using barcodes depends on the codes being readable at every step. The use of the GS1 standards ensures that barcodes are printed consistently and anyone using barcode scanners that meet the same requirements should be able to read them with no problems – regardless of whether they are using brand new imaging scanners or have 20-year-old laser scanners in a warehouse.

For anyone shipping barcoded packaging, verification is the only way to know for sure the barcode is correct and that it will be readable.

I had a great example of this just yesterday – a label printed on one of our own labeling systems included a UPC code. I didn’t have a verifier handy or even an industrial scanner – just my trusty phone. I scanned the barcode with two reliable apps – one would read it easily, one not at all. Did my barcode meet the GS1 requirement? I have no idea! This wasn’t for a production job so not a big deal. On the other hand, if you are using barcodes for your product or secondary packaging, you never want to be in that uncertain position.

Want to Learn More?

If you want to learn more about the various barcodes and how they are used in the GS1 system, you can download our GS1 Barcode Intro. Also, our ID Technology team is always ready to help you make sure that you labeling and barcode operations meet all your customer’s and GS1 requirements. Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3 or contact David Holliday at dholliday@idtechnology.com. We can help you sort through the details and be on your way to labeling and coding your products with confidence.

 

 

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Barcodes – Validation vs Verification in GS1

When talking about ensuring barcodes are correct, many people use the words validation and verification as though they are interchangeable – this is something that is not correct. Many companies that should know better promote their barcode reading systems as verifying barcodes when they are actually validating.

Validating and verifying a barcode are two separate processes, each being important to ensuring that barcodes used on products and packaging are correctly encoded with the right data and that the quality is of an acceptable level.
Barcodes are very important in many industries. Whether used to identify a product in a retail store, a shipping case traveling through a logistics supply chain, or on an important component used in aerospace, each barcode should contain the right data (encoded in the appropriate format) and also be guaranteed to be read with an appropriate barcode scanner.
If you are printing or using barcodes within the GS1 system, every application has rules concerning how the data is encoded and the minimum barcode quality standards. Some organizations demand that their vendors meet the GS1 quality standards (or sometimes exceed them) and failure to do so can result in very expensive chargebacks for non-compliance.
Let’s look more closely at Validation and Verification for linear barcodes – we’ll discuss 2D barcodes in a future article.
Barcodes – Validation vs Verification in GS1

Barcode Validation

Barcode Validation is all about ensuring the barcode actually scans and that the format of the data is correct for the application in question. As mentioned above, Validation is like spelling and it is easy to do – in most cases, we can validate barcodes with our smartphones. Here’s a quick example:
Barcodes – Validation vs Verification in GS1

This is a very common barcode – a GS1 128 code that is encoded with a GTIN and a lot (or batch) number. Using the Barcode Check app on my phone I can get a very helpful validation report:

Barcodes – Validation vs Verification in GS1

This is really useful because it shows me that my barcode meets the GS1 encoding spec and it confirms that the GTIN and lot number are correctly identified. This app also produces a report that can be saved or emailed.

While this is all very good – and I use this and similar apps all the time – validating the barcode does not show that it meets the GS1 or any other quality standard. It certainly won’t help when your large customer tells you that although your barcodes scan ok, they are not meeting the GS1 quality criteria. To ensure barcode quality, it is important to have a program in place to actually verify that your barcodes are meeting the quality standard.

Barcode Verification

For GS1 applications, there are clearly defined quality standards for each type of barcode that is allowed for that application.

As an example, here are the common barcodes GS1 allows for use in General Distribution (that don’t need to be scanned at POS):

Barcodes – Validation vs Verification in GS1

Barcodes for General Distribution (Click for larger version)

I’ve left out a few of the allowed barcodes (the GS1 Databar codes) to keep the table size manageable – in my experience, most barcodes used in distribution (at least in North America) are ITF-14 and GS1-128, with UPC from time to time. Note that currently (late 2018), only linear barcodes are approved for these distribution applications.

As well as specifying barcode symbols the table also shows the maximum and minimum sizes for the barcode x-dimension (width of the smallest bars) and height, as well as the minimum quiet zone (clear space) that needs to be positioned at each end of the barcode. The final column in the table specifies the minimum quality specification that the barcode is required to meet – in each case, it is defined as 1.5/10/660. In the remainder of this article, we’ll look at what these numbers mean.

1.5/10/660

In the GS1 system, linear barcodes are verified against the ISO/IEC 15426-1 standard.

The standard grades a number of the barcode parameters and returns a single score – in the case of the GS1 distribution barcodes (with one exception) that score is 1.5.

The verification process inspects a number of parameters and assigns each one a grade between 0.0 and 4.0.

The standard recommends that 10 scans are completed for each parameter (across different parts of the symbol) and the score for that parameter is the average of the 10.

The lowest score for any one of the parameters is the overall score for that symbol – it is rounded to one decimal place.

In our GS1 example, the 1.5 represents the minimum passing score the symbol must achieve.

Aperture & Wavelength of Verification Device.

When verifying a barcode, the resolution of the inspecting device as well as the lighting in the area can have an effect on the results obtained.

In an effort to standardize the testing as much as possible, GS1 specifies two testing parameters.

GS1 Webinar

Recently I did a short webinar on validation and verification with SATO America and GS1 – check it out!

An Exception to the Rule.

After all this attempt at standardization, there is an exception included in the GS1 specification.

When printing directly onto brown corrugated (using technologies such as inkjet, or flexo), the lack of contrast between the bars and the brown background material causes the verification score to be reduced and the 1.5 target to be unobtainable.

GS1 takes this into account by making the following statement: “For ITF-14 symbols printed on labels with off-set, thermal, or laser print with an X-dimension 0.495 millimetre (0.0195 inch), the minimum quality specification is 1.5/10/660. For ITF-14 symbols printed directly on corrugate or labels with an X-dimension greater than or equal to 0.635 millimetre (0.0250 inch), the minimum quality specification is 0.5/20/660”.

So our customers using FoxJet ProSeries printers to print the ITF-14 barcode on cases can verify against the less stringent target, as long as the x-dimension is is above 25 mils.

Why Go Through All This?

Obviously, the use of auto-identification of items in supply chains using barcodes depends on the codes being readable at every step. The use of the GS1 standards ensures that barcodes are printed consistently and anyone using barcode scanners that meet the same requirements should be able to read them with no problems – regardless of whether they are using brand new imaging scanners or have 20-year-old laser scanners in a warehouse.

For anyone shipping barcoded packaging, verification is the only way to know for sure the barcode is correct and that it will be readable.

I had a great example of this just yesterday – a label printed on one of our own labeling systems included a UPC code. I didn’t have a verifier handy or even an industrial scanner – just my trusty phone. I scanned the barcode with two reliable apps – one would read it easily, one not at all. Did my barcode meet the GS1 requirement? I have no idea! This wasn’t for a production job so not a big deal. On the other hand, if you are using barcodes for your product or secondary packaging, you never want to be in that uncertain position.

Want to Learn More?

If you want to learn more about the various barcodes and how they are used in the GS1 system, you can download our GS1 Barcode Intro. Also, our ID Technology team is always ready to help you make sure that you labeling and barcode operations meet all your customer’s and GS1 requirements. Contact us today at 888-438-3242 Option#3 or contact David Holliday at dholliday@idtechnology.com. We can help you sort through the details and be on your way to labeling and coding your products with confidence.

 

 

[post_excerpt] => When talking about ensuring barcodes are correct, many people use the words validation and verification as though they are interchangeable – this is something that is not correct. Many companies that should know better promote their barcode reading systems as verifying barcodes when they are actually validating. Validating and verifying a barcode are two separate […] [post_date_gmt] => 2018-11-28 21:10:02 [post_date] => 2018-11-28 21:10:02 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-11-28 21:10:02 [post_modified] => 2018-11-28 21:10:02 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => http://www.labelingnews.com/?p=5858 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => Labeling News [syndication_source_uri] => http://www.labelingnews.com [syndication_source_id] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/labelingnews/HCzq [syndication_feed_id] => 12 [syndication_permalink] => http://www.labelingnews.com/2018/11/barcodes-validation-vs-verification-in-gs1/ [syndication_item_hash] => Array ( [0] => 471bca0137552ba529b75823f80406b3 [1] => d427dd21c74300b34cd718ded638fb80 [2] => fe0ea45a417e2614663f9f6661343c34 [3] => a1d27a229a92d080c27ab655cadfdd00 [4] => 2aa562a6d75c8b4c32e9fa243413c834 ) [faf_featured_image] => 0 [faf_process_image] => 0,0,0,0,0 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 1625 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) [post_name] => barcodes-validation-vs-verification-in-gs1 )


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A profitably disruptive energy strategy

Array ( [post_title] => A profitably disruptive energy strategy [post_content] =>

A profitably disruptive energy strategy

The basic configuration of electrical power systems for industrial and commercial applications has altered little for decades. A disruptive new technology – hybridisation – is expected to change this, according to Steve Moore.

With energy costs expected to continue to rise for the foreseeable future, businesses need to devote more effort into finding ways of controlling and reducing energy expenditure. An obvious approach is to improve the efficiency of a process so that it consumes less energy. 

While this approach is logical and laudable, particularly as it helps to protect the environment, it is also limited. Inevitably a point will be reached where no further increase in the energy efficiency of a process is realistically possible. 

In this event the only option is to find energy at a lower price and today this requires a creative solution such as hybridisation. 

So, what is hybridisation? In this context, its most general meaning is a power system that has access to two or more independent sources of energy. In this definition, the word independent is important – a power system that can be fed from either of two utility substations, for example, wouldn’t qualify as a hybrid system, because it simply has two connections to the same energy source. However, a power system that can take power from the grid and also from, say, a solar panel installation is definitely a hybrid system.

Adding a renewable energy source to an industrial or commercial power system can lead to useful cost savings but, if energy storage – most often in the form of batteries – is added as well, hybridisation has the potential to save even more money, as well as making the power system much more versatile in operation.

Typically, hybrid power solutions are used in ‘behind the meter’ applications, a good example of which is peak shaving. It’s axiomatic that the power system for a factory has to be designed so that it can safely supply the factory’s maximum load. However, it is highly likely that this maximum power demand will be intermittent – just a few hours a week is typical. Which means that the power transformers feeding the plant are for most of the time working well below their full capacity.

Consider this
Now consider a factory with a hybrid power system incorporating energy storage. The expensive power transformers can now be rated to cope with the average rather than the peak load, with the battery called on to make up the difference during periods of maximum load. This is peak shaving.

Many industrial and commercial supplies are charged on the basis of a ‘maximum demand’ tariff, which means that the utility charges the energy user not only for the amount of energy they consume, but also on the basis of the maximum load they put on the energy supply system. This extra charge is unwelcome but justifiable, as the utility’s plant has to be capable of dealing with the peak demand, however infrequently it occurs. Peak shaving enables energy users to limit their maximum power requirement from the grid by supplying some of their peak energy needs from their batteries. This results directly in a reduced maximum demand charge.

In reality, peak shaving, as described above, is only one of the many benefits offered by hybrid power systems with energy storage. Another option is to use batteries to store energy from the supply system at times when the price is low and release it at those times when energy prices are highest. This can be considered as another form of peak shaving and is capable of significantly reducing energy bills. Yet another capability offered by some hybrid power systems is the ability to generate reactive power on demand. This feature can be used to improve a site’s power factor and thereby save both energy and money.

For power systems that include intermittent energy sources, such as solar panels and wind generators, hybrid power systems offer even more benefits, as they can be used to ‘firm up’ the supply, maintaining the output from the intermittent source at a constant level and avoiding voltage variations on the grid when the energy production of the source changes. 

A hybrid power system with energy storage can reduce capital expenditure on equipment like transformers and save money on energy costs by cutting maximum demand, improving power factor and reducing peak-rate energy usage, but it can also do more. The batteries can continue to supply the plant in the event that the supply from the national grid fails. In such cases, the hybrid system effectively operates as an uninterruptible power supply (UPS) and can, in some cases, eliminate the need for a separate UPS installation to supply critical or sensitive loads. 

Another option offered by hybrid power systems is the ability to feed energy from the batteries, from solar panels or from other local power sources, back into the grid. The payment the utility makes for this energy is an effective way of further reducing energy bills.  And a hybrid power system can generate even more revenue from the grid operator by providing services such as firm frequency response to help balance the grid’s supply and demand.
 
An available technology
The technologies needed to implement hybrid energy systems is readily available. There have been big developments in the batteries used for energy storage in recent years, with lithium-ion technology being a popular choice, especially for fast-response short-period requirements. 

However, batteries and some renewable energy sources such as solar panels, produce DC power, whereas the national grid and almost all industrial and commercial power systems need AC. Fortunately, once again a solution is available with standard inverters. In their variable speed drive guise, inverters take AC power at supply frequency, convert it to DC (the so-called DC link) and then convert the DC back to AC at the frequency needed to control the motor.

But the DC link doesn’t care where the power comes from, so it can equally be fed from a battery or a solar panel and it will convert the DC to AC at a frequency that can be accurately matched to and synchronised with the power grid. The inverters used in hybrid power system applications are fully bidirectional so can also take power from the grid and use it to top up the batteries.

While at first sight it may seem that the inverter hardware needed for hybrid applications would be somewhat different from that used in variable speed drives, it turns out that this need not be the case. Danfoss inverters for hybrid power systems use exactly the same hardware as variable speed drive applications, though the on-board software is, as would be expected, designed to offer different functionality. 

This should not be taken to mean, however, that designing and implementing a dependable and efficient hybrid power system is merely a matter of buying some standard components off the shelf and following the installation instructions! Expertise is needed to put together an optimised system and anyone thinking about investing in hybrid power is well advised to seek out suppliers with proven expertise in this relatively new area of technology. 

Hybrid power systems are radically different from those that have gone before and they can provide huge benefits in terms of cost savings and reduced environmental impact and it is possible to benefit from this technology today.

Steve Moore is solution sales manager at Danfoss Drives.

> [post_excerpt] =>

The basic configuration of electrical power systems for industrial and commercial applications has altered little for decades. A disruptive new technology – hybridisation – is expected to change this, according to Steve Moore. [post_date_gmt] => 2019-08-19 14:23:20 [post_date] => 2019-08-19 14:23:20 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-08-19 14:23:20 [post_modified] => 2019-08-19 14:23:20 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => CEE-172410 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => global/showimage.ashx?Type=Article&ID=178813 image/jpeg ) [syndication_source] => Control Engineering Europe - All Articles [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_source_id] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed_id] => 17 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/rss/article/172410/A-profitably-disruptive-energy-strategy.aspx [syndication_item_hash] => dfbd6848ccb3ff9b003ed8849d51fb75 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

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Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :A profitably disruptive energy strategy

Array ( [post_title] => A profitably disruptive energy strategy [post_content] =>

A profitably disruptive energy strategy

The basic configuration of electrical power systems for industrial and commercial applications has altered little for decades. A disruptive new technology – hybridisation – is expected to change this, according to Steve Moore.

With energy costs expected to continue to rise for the foreseeable future, businesses need to devote more effort into finding ways of controlling and reducing energy expenditure. An obvious approach is to improve the efficiency of a process so that it consumes less energy. 

While this approach is logical and laudable, particularly as it helps to protect the environment, it is also limited. Inevitably a point will be reached where no further increase in the energy efficiency of a process is realistically possible. 

In this event the only option is to find energy at a lower price and today this requires a creative solution such as hybridisation. 

So, what is hybridisation? In this context, its most general meaning is a power system that has access to two or more independent sources of energy. In this definition, the word independent is important – a power system that can be fed from either of two utility substations, for example, wouldn’t qualify as a hybrid system, because it simply has two connections to the same energy source. However, a power system that can take power from the grid and also from, say, a solar panel installation is definitely a hybrid system.

Adding a renewable energy source to an industrial or commercial power system can lead to useful cost savings but, if energy storage – most often in the form of batteries – is added as well, hybridisation has the potential to save even more money, as well as making the power system much more versatile in operation.

Typically, hybrid power solutions are used in ‘behind the meter’ applications, a good example of which is peak shaving. It’s axiomatic that the power system for a factory has to be designed so that it can safely supply the factory’s maximum load. However, it is highly likely that this maximum power demand will be intermittent – just a few hours a week is typical. Which means that the power transformers feeding the plant are for most of the time working well below their full capacity.

Consider this
Now consider a factory with a hybrid power system incorporating energy storage. The expensive power transformers can now be rated to cope with the average rather than the peak load, with the battery called on to make up the difference during periods of maximum load. This is peak shaving.

Many industrial and commercial supplies are charged on the basis of a ‘maximum demand’ tariff, which means that the utility charges the energy user not only for the amount of energy they consume, but also on the basis of the maximum load they put on the energy supply system. This extra charge is unwelcome but justifiable, as the utility’s plant has to be capable of dealing with the peak demand, however infrequently it occurs. Peak shaving enables energy users to limit their maximum power requirement from the grid by supplying some of their peak energy needs from their batteries. This results directly in a reduced maximum demand charge.

In reality, peak shaving, as described above, is only one of the many benefits offered by hybrid power systems with energy storage. Another option is to use batteries to store energy from the supply system at times when the price is low and release it at those times when energy prices are highest. This can be considered as another form of peak shaving and is capable of significantly reducing energy bills. Yet another capability offered by some hybrid power systems is the ability to generate reactive power on demand. This feature can be used to improve a site’s power factor and thereby save both energy and money.

For power systems that include intermittent energy sources, such as solar panels and wind generators, hybrid power systems offer even more benefits, as they can be used to ‘firm up’ the supply, maintaining the output from the intermittent source at a constant level and avoiding voltage variations on the grid when the energy production of the source changes. 

A hybrid power system with energy storage can reduce capital expenditure on equipment like transformers and save money on energy costs by cutting maximum demand, improving power factor and reducing peak-rate energy usage, but it can also do more. The batteries can continue to supply the plant in the event that the supply from the national grid fails. In such cases, the hybrid system effectively operates as an uninterruptible power supply (UPS) and can, in some cases, eliminate the need for a separate UPS installation to supply critical or sensitive loads. 

Another option offered by hybrid power systems is the ability to feed energy from the batteries, from solar panels or from other local power sources, back into the grid. The payment the utility makes for this energy is an effective way of further reducing energy bills.  And a hybrid power system can generate even more revenue from the grid operator by providing services such as firm frequency response to help balance the grid’s supply and demand.
 
An available technology
The technologies needed to implement hybrid energy systems is readily available. There have been big developments in the batteries used for energy storage in recent years, with lithium-ion technology being a popular choice, especially for fast-response short-period requirements. 

However, batteries and some renewable energy sources such as solar panels, produce DC power, whereas the national grid and almost all industrial and commercial power systems need AC. Fortunately, once again a solution is available with standard inverters. In their variable speed drive guise, inverters take AC power at supply frequency, convert it to DC (the so-called DC link) and then convert the DC back to AC at the frequency needed to control the motor.

But the DC link doesn’t care where the power comes from, so it can equally be fed from a battery or a solar panel and it will convert the DC to AC at a frequency that can be accurately matched to and synchronised with the power grid. The inverters used in hybrid power system applications are fully bidirectional so can also take power from the grid and use it to top up the batteries.

While at first sight it may seem that the inverter hardware needed for hybrid applications would be somewhat different from that used in variable speed drives, it turns out that this need not be the case. Danfoss inverters for hybrid power systems use exactly the same hardware as variable speed drive applications, though the on-board software is, as would be expected, designed to offer different functionality. 

This should not be taken to mean, however, that designing and implementing a dependable and efficient hybrid power system is merely a matter of buying some standard components off the shelf and following the installation instructions! Expertise is needed to put together an optimised system and anyone thinking about investing in hybrid power is well advised to seek out suppliers with proven expertise in this relatively new area of technology. 

Hybrid power systems are radically different from those that have gone before and they can provide huge benefits in terms of cost savings and reduced environmental impact and it is possible to benefit from this technology today.

Steve Moore is solution sales manager at Danfoss Drives.

> [post_excerpt] =>

The basic configuration of electrical power systems for industrial and commercial applications has altered little for decades. A disruptive new technology – hybridisation – is expected to change this, according to Steve Moore. [post_date_gmt] => 2019-08-19 14:23:20 [post_date] => 2019-08-19 14:23:20 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-08-19 14:23:20 [post_modified] => 2019-08-19 14:23:20 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => CEE-172410 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => global/showimage.ashx?Type=Article&ID=178813 image/jpeg ) [syndication_source] => Control Engineering Europe - All Articles [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_source_id] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed_id] => 17 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/rss/article/172410/A-profitably-disruptive-energy-strategy.aspx [syndication_item_hash] => dfbd6848ccb3ff9b003ed8849d51fb75 [faf_process_image] => ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )


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Edge computer gains a second Ethernet interface

Array ( [post_title] => Edge computer gains a second Ethernet interface [post_content] =>

Edge computer gains a second Ethernet interface

HARTING has added a second interface to its MICA Edge Computing device which allows it to easily exchange and process data between two Ethernet networks, including wired-to-wireless gateway applications.

In many Industry 4.0 applications, it is necessary to separate networks and send data back and forth between Ethernet protocols without allowing external applications direct access to a corporate network. As a result, HARTING has added a second interface to its MICA Edge Computing device which allows it to easily exchange and process data between two Ethernet networks, including wired-to-wireless gateway applications.

An additional USB interface can also be used for adding further capabilities or a USB storage device. This is because, unlike a router, MICA can also carry out complex data transformations and aggregations.

The secondary Ethernet interface is provided via the functional circuit board and expands the modular system of the MICA platform. MICA Wireless with WLAN, BLE and LTE connectivity with an additional Ethernet interface offers an easy to manage and compact solution for many projects in the areas of industry and transportation. It can, for example be used as a wired-to-wireless gateway for collecting maintenance data from PLCs and to send relevant events to the machine manufacturer or maintenance services. In addition, MICA Wireless can process nodes for RFID readers connected via WLAN. 

> [post_excerpt] =>

HARTING has added a second interface to its MICA Edge Computing device which allows it to easily exchange and process data between two Ethernet networks, including wired-to-wireless gateway applications. [post_date_gmt] => 2019-08-19 14:19:25 [post_date] => 2019-08-19 14:19:25 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-08-19 14:19:25 [post_modified] => 2019-08-19 14:19:25 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => CEE-172409 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => global/showimage.ashx?Type=Article&ID=178812 image/jpeg ) [syndication_source] => Control Engineering Europe - All Articles [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_source_id] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed_id] => 17 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/rss/article/172409/Edge-computer-gains-a-second-Ethernet-interface.aspx [syndication_item_hash] => 6a1aeef13be1a4310f5ed3933c8558a5 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

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Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => global/showimage.ashx?Type=Article&ID=178812 image/jpeg ) [syndication_source] => Control Engineering Europe - All Articles [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_source_id] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed_id] => 17 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/rss/article/172409/Edge-computer-gains-a-second-Ethernet-interface.aspx [syndication_item_hash] => 6a1aeef13be1a4310f5ed3933c8558a5 )

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Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :Edge computer gains a second Ethernet interface

Array ( [post_title] => Edge computer gains a second Ethernet interface [post_content] =>

Edge computer gains a second Ethernet interface

HARTING has added a second interface to its MICA Edge Computing device which allows it to easily exchange and process data between two Ethernet networks, including wired-to-wireless gateway applications.

In many Industry 4.0 applications, it is necessary to separate networks and send data back and forth between Ethernet protocols without allowing external applications direct access to a corporate network. As a result, HARTING has added a second interface to its MICA Edge Computing device which allows it to easily exchange and process data between two Ethernet networks, including wired-to-wireless gateway applications.

An additional USB interface can also be used for adding further capabilities or a USB storage device. This is because, unlike a router, MICA can also carry out complex data transformations and aggregations.

The secondary Ethernet interface is provided via the functional circuit board and expands the modular system of the MICA platform. MICA Wireless with WLAN, BLE and LTE connectivity with an additional Ethernet interface offers an easy to manage and compact solution for many projects in the areas of industry and transportation. It can, for example be used as a wired-to-wireless gateway for collecting maintenance data from PLCs and to send relevant events to the machine manufacturer or maintenance services. In addition, MICA Wireless can process nodes for RFID readers connected via WLAN. 

> [post_excerpt] =>

HARTING has added a second interface to its MICA Edge Computing device which allows it to easily exchange and process data between two Ethernet networks, including wired-to-wireless gateway applications. [post_date_gmt] => 2019-08-19 14:19:25 [post_date] => 2019-08-19 14:19:25 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-08-19 14:19:25 [post_modified] => 2019-08-19 14:19:25 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => CEE-172409 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => global/showimage.ashx?Type=Article&ID=178812 image/jpeg ) [syndication_source] => Control Engineering Europe - All Articles [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_source_id] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed_id] => 17 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/rss/article/172409/Edge-computer-gains-a-second-Ethernet-interface.aspx [syndication_item_hash] => 6a1aeef13be1a4310f5ed3933c8558a5 [faf_process_image] => ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )


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Levelling the robot playing field for low-repetition tasks

Array ( [post_title] => Levelling the robot playing field for low-repetition tasks [post_content] =>

Levelling the robot playing field for low-repetition tasks

Automata would appear to have created a truly innovative collaborative robot – from the ground up – in a bid to meet the growing need for automated solutions for less repetitive tasks. A key element of the design of the cobot was to provide a solution with low deployed system costs to enable it to offer a cost-effective automated solution.

The result is Eva, a robot arm with six-degrees of freedom and with desktop-class simplicity and affordability, but industrial grade performance. With prices starting at £5,000, the robot arm costs at least one-third that of comparable offerings currently on the market. Automata tells us that Eva is able to drastically reduce integration time – the robot can be set up in just 15 minutes, being run via a simple to use bespoke browser-based interface – Choreograph – which can be run on any device, even untethered to the robot. The robot can be directly connected to a computer via Ethernet or wifi or can be added to a network in the same way as a printer. It provides 24V Industrial Logic: digital and analogue inputs and outputs, totalling 32 pins.

Eva is housed in a IP20-rated enclosure and has a footprint of just 160 x 160mm. It is able to operate in temperatures of between 5 and 40°C and at humidities of up to 90% 

To keep the cost of the robot low, Automata employed commodity components wherever possible. For example, it used two low-cost position sensors and clever math to gain high precision, in place of a single high-cost precision sensor. It also created a new powertrain stack from scratch, which is manufacturable at 25% the cost of competitors. The robot arm includes six servos each containing a powertrain which has provided massive gains in unit economics per robot.

To date Eva has been employed in applications including pick and place, spot gluing and product testing. 

> [post_excerpt] =>

Automata would appear to have created a truly innovative collaborative robot – from the ground up – in a bid to meet the growing need for automated solutions for less repetitive tasks. A key element of the design of the cobot was to provide a solution with low deployed system costs to enable it to offer a cost-effective automated solution. [post_date_gmt] => 2019-08-19 14:16:42 [post_date] => 2019-08-19 14:16:42 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-08-19 14:16:42 [post_modified] => 2019-08-19 14:16:42 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => CEE-172408 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => global/showimage.ashx?Type=Article&ID=178811 image/jpeg ) [syndication_source] => Control Engineering Europe - All Articles [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_source_id] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed_id] => 17 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/rss/article/172408/Levelling-the-robot-playing-field-for-low-repetition-tasks.aspx [syndication_item_hash] => 9ff9967225b1a10a7307108834c28e08 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

Doing filter:faf_image_filter

Execute image filter

Image process

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Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => global/showimage.ashx?Type=Article&ID=178811 image/jpeg ) [syndication_source] => Control Engineering Europe - All Articles [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_source_id] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed_id] => 17 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/rss/article/172408/Levelling-the-robot-playing-field-for-low-repetition-tasks.aspx [syndication_item_hash] => 9ff9967225b1a10a7307108834c28e08 )

Execute : Enclosure images

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Array ( [0] => global/showimage.ashx?Type=Article&ID=178811 image/jpeg )

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Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :Levelling the robot playing field for low-repetition tasks

Array ( [post_title] => Levelling the robot playing field for low-repetition tasks [post_content] =>

Levelling the robot playing field for low-repetition tasks

Automata would appear to have created a truly innovative collaborative robot – from the ground up – in a bid to meet the growing need for automated solutions for less repetitive tasks. A key element of the design of the cobot was to provide a solution with low deployed system costs to enable it to offer a cost-effective automated solution.

The result is Eva, a robot arm with six-degrees of freedom and with desktop-class simplicity and affordability, but industrial grade performance. With prices starting at £5,000, the robot arm costs at least one-third that of comparable offerings currently on the market. Automata tells us that Eva is able to drastically reduce integration time – the robot can be set up in just 15 minutes, being run via a simple to use bespoke browser-based interface – Choreograph – which can be run on any device, even untethered to the robot. The robot can be directly connected to a computer via Ethernet or wifi or can be added to a network in the same way as a printer. It provides 24V Industrial Logic: digital and analogue inputs and outputs, totalling 32 pins.

Eva is housed in a IP20-rated enclosure and has a footprint of just 160 x 160mm. It is able to operate in temperatures of between 5 and 40°C and at humidities of up to 90% 

To keep the cost of the robot low, Automata employed commodity components wherever possible. For example, it used two low-cost position sensors and clever math to gain high precision, in place of a single high-cost precision sensor. It also created a new powertrain stack from scratch, which is manufacturable at 25% the cost of competitors. The robot arm includes six servos each containing a powertrain which has provided massive gains in unit economics per robot.

To date Eva has been employed in applications including pick and place, spot gluing and product testing. 

> [post_excerpt] =>

Automata would appear to have created a truly innovative collaborative robot – from the ground up – in a bid to meet the growing need for automated solutions for less repetitive tasks. A key element of the design of the cobot was to provide a solution with low deployed system costs to enable it to offer a cost-effective automated solution. [post_date_gmt] => 2019-08-19 14:16:42 [post_date] => 2019-08-19 14:16:42 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-08-19 14:16:42 [post_modified] => 2019-08-19 14:16:42 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => CEE-172408 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => global/showimage.ashx?Type=Article&ID=178811 image/jpeg ) [syndication_source] => Control Engineering Europe - All Articles [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_source_id] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed_id] => 17 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/rss/article/172408/Levelling-the-robot-playing-field-for-low-repetition-tasks.aspx [syndication_item_hash] => 9ff9967225b1a10a7307108834c28e08 [faf_process_image] => ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )


Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /homepages/41/d79740523/htdocs/converternews/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/syndicatedpost.class.php on line 708

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Wanted: engineers to share career stories

Array ( [post_title] => Wanted: engineers to share career stories [post_content] =>

Wanted: engineers to share career stories

EngineeringUK is on the lookout for early career engineers, engineering technicians or apprentices who are interested in sharing the story of their job and the route that got them started. The career stories will help to inspire the next generation of engineers to consider a role in engineering.

By seeing what engineers do in their day-to-day work and learning how they started their careers, through both academic and vocational paths, the case studies aim to help young people understand how jobs in engineering can be achieved and how their interests can play a central part of their future professional life.
 
Over one-quarter of UK enterprises are involved in engineering, employing more than 5.5 million people. Demand for engineering skills is high and will continue to rise in the future. EngineeringUK estimates the UK will need around 203,000 roles requiring engineering skills to be filled annually through to 2024.

There’s a critical shortfall in the young people on pathways to fill future jobs that won’t be resolved simply by encouraging more people to study science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM). EngineeringUK is committed to Equality, Diversity and Inclusion and the need to increase the diversity as well as the number of young people choosing academic and vocational pathways into engineering.  

Women are underrepresented in engineering, making up only 12% of the workforce, and at A level only 29% of girls’ take STEM subjects. Black, Asian and minority ethnic people (BAME) are also underrepresented in the engineering sector and to that end EngineeringUK is particularly keen to feature on the Tomorrow’s Engineers site the stories of engineers working in the UK from a BAME background.

By showing young people that engineers from similar backgrounds to themselves are engaged in well paid and fulfilling careers and by letting them know how to go about pursuing such a career for themselves, Tomorrow’s Engineers hopes to show young people that there is potentially a place for them in engineering.

The Real Jobs section of the Tomorrow’s Engineers website features interview case studies with people working in all areas of the engineering world but is additionally seeking voices from newer and expanding areas of the sector. Tomorrow’s Engineers would also like to hear from engineering professionals who have entered their career through a vocational or apprenticeship route.

Depending on time pressures, availability and location of the participant the stories on the website can take the form of a short, written piece or a video interview.

Engineers interested in helping promote their work and taking part are encouraged to get in touch and the Tomorrow’s Engineers communications team will follow up: https://www.tomorrowsengineers.org.uk/mystory

> [post_excerpt] =>

EngineeringUK is on the lookout for early career engineers, engineering technicians or apprentices who are interested in sharing the story of their job and the route that got them started. The career stories will help to inspire the next generation of engineers to consider a role in engineering. [post_date_gmt] => 2019-08-19 14:12:01 [post_date] => 2019-08-19 14:12:01 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-08-19 14:12:01 [post_modified] => 2019-08-19 14:12:01 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => CEE-172407 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => global/showimage.ashx?Type=Article&ID=178810 image/jpeg ) [syndication_source] => Control Engineering Europe - All Articles [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_source_id] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed_id] => 17 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/rss/article/172407/Wanted--engineers-to-share-career-stories.aspx [syndication_item_hash] => 213e842a6fde6de5872cf9abc53d9321 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

Doing filter:faf_image_filter

Execute image filter

Image process

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Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => global/showimage.ashx?Type=Article&ID=178810 image/jpeg ) [syndication_source] => Control Engineering Europe - All Articles [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_source_id] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed_id] => 17 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/rss/article/172407/Wanted--engineers-to-share-career-stories.aspx [syndication_item_hash] => 213e842a6fde6de5872cf9abc53d9321 )

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Array ( [0] => global/showimage.ashx?Type=Article&ID=178810 image/jpeg )

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Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :Wanted: engineers to share career stories

Array ( [post_title] => Wanted: engineers to share career stories [post_content] =>

Wanted: engineers to share career stories

EngineeringUK is on the lookout for early career engineers, engineering technicians or apprentices who are interested in sharing the story of their job and the route that got them started. The career stories will help to inspire the next generation of engineers to consider a role in engineering.

By seeing what engineers do in their day-to-day work and learning how they started their careers, through both academic and vocational paths, the case studies aim to help young people understand how jobs in engineering can be achieved and how their interests can play a central part of their future professional life.
 
Over one-quarter of UK enterprises are involved in engineering, employing more than 5.5 million people. Demand for engineering skills is high and will continue to rise in the future. EngineeringUK estimates the UK will need around 203,000 roles requiring engineering skills to be filled annually through to 2024.

There’s a critical shortfall in the young people on pathways to fill future jobs that won’t be resolved simply by encouraging more people to study science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM). EngineeringUK is committed to Equality, Diversity and Inclusion and the need to increase the diversity as well as the number of young people choosing academic and vocational pathways into engineering.  

Women are underrepresented in engineering, making up only 12% of the workforce, and at A level only 29% of girls’ take STEM subjects. Black, Asian and minority ethnic people (BAME) are also underrepresented in the engineering sector and to that end EngineeringUK is particularly keen to feature on the Tomorrow’s Engineers site the stories of engineers working in the UK from a BAME background.

By showing young people that engineers from similar backgrounds to themselves are engaged in well paid and fulfilling careers and by letting them know how to go about pursuing such a career for themselves, Tomorrow’s Engineers hopes to show young people that there is potentially a place for them in engineering.

The Real Jobs section of the Tomorrow’s Engineers website features interview case studies with people working in all areas of the engineering world but is additionally seeking voices from newer and expanding areas of the sector. Tomorrow’s Engineers would also like to hear from engineering professionals who have entered their career through a vocational or apprenticeship route.

Depending on time pressures, availability and location of the participant the stories on the website can take the form of a short, written piece or a video interview.

Engineers interested in helping promote their work and taking part are encouraged to get in touch and the Tomorrow’s Engineers communications team will follow up: https://www.tomorrowsengineers.org.uk/mystory

> [post_excerpt] =>

EngineeringUK is on the lookout for early career engineers, engineering technicians or apprentices who are interested in sharing the story of their job and the route that got them started. The career stories will help to inspire the next generation of engineers to consider a role in engineering. [post_date_gmt] => 2019-08-19 14:12:01 [post_date] => 2019-08-19 14:12:01 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-08-19 14:12:01 [post_modified] => 2019-08-19 14:12:01 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => CEE-172407 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => global/showimage.ashx?Type=Article&ID=178810 image/jpeg ) [syndication_source] => Control Engineering Europe - All Articles [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_source_id] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed_id] => 17 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/rss/article/172407/Wanted--engineers-to-share-career-stories.aspx [syndication_item_hash] => 213e842a6fde6de5872cf9abc53d9321 [faf_process_image] => ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )


Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /homepages/41/d79740523/htdocs/converternews/wp-content/plugins/feedwordpress/syndicatedpost.class.php on line 708

FAF deciding on filters on post to be syndicated:

Cork inspection vision solution

Array ( [post_title] => Cork inspection vision solution [post_content] =>

Cork inspection vision solution

The Cork Inspector is a new addition to the Eye Vision Technology (EVT) emSens Beverage Inspection series. It can inspect corks in bottles, to ensure they are in the correct position, or stick out too much (convex) or are seated too deep in the bottle neck (concave).

The compact system includes interfaces which allow the user to connect several high-speed and high-resolution cameras. Additionally, the Cork Inspector has an integrated illumination control for several channels for LED illuminations.

Communication, with a tracker system as well as with a PLC or SCADA system, can be carried out via different hardware interfaces such as RS232, RS485, GigE Ethernet or USB connections.
With the configurable tracker protocol different tracker boards and systems can be integrated into the software and the inspection process, no matter which interface. 

The Cork Inspector can be also integrated into complex bottling plants.Process integration and communication can be carried out via standard software interfaces, for example OPC UA, Profinet, Modbus or also standard Ethernet UDP and TCP/IP and the results, with images, can be displayed at the control station

The Cork Inspector includes pre-configured bottle types and can be adjusted to new types. Adjustment can be carried out either by configuring existing bottle types or new parameters can be set up.

> [post_excerpt] =>

The Cork Inspector is a new addition to the Eye Vision Technology (EVT) emSens Beverage Inspection series. It can inspect corks in bottles, to ensure they are in the correct position, or stick out too much (convex) or are seated too deep in the bottle neck (concave). [post_date_gmt] => 2019-08-19 14:07:31 [post_date] => 2019-08-19 14:07:31 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-08-19 14:07:31 [post_modified] => 2019-08-19 14:07:31 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => CEE-172406 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => global/showimage.ashx?Type=Article&ID=178809 image/jpeg ) [syndication_source] => Control Engineering Europe - All Articles [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_source_id] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed_id] => 17 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/rss/article/172406/Cork-inspection-vision-solution.aspx [syndication_item_hash] => 1063a92b9215bbf646f347c5a200d1cd ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

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Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => global/showimage.ashx?Type=Article&ID=178809 image/jpeg ) [syndication_source] => Control Engineering Europe - All Articles [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_source_id] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed_id] => 17 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/rss/article/172406/Cork-inspection-vision-solution.aspx [syndication_item_hash] => 1063a92b9215bbf646f347c5a200d1cd )

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Array ( [0] => global/showimage.ashx?Type=Article&ID=178809 image/jpeg )

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Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :Cork inspection vision solution

Array ( [post_title] => Cork inspection vision solution [post_content] =>

Cork inspection vision solution

The Cork Inspector is a new addition to the Eye Vision Technology (EVT) emSens Beverage Inspection series. It can inspect corks in bottles, to ensure they are in the correct position, or stick out too much (convex) or are seated too deep in the bottle neck (concave).

The compact system includes interfaces which allow the user to connect several high-speed and high-resolution cameras. Additionally, the Cork Inspector has an integrated illumination control for several channels for LED illuminations.

Communication, with a tracker system as well as with a PLC or SCADA system, can be carried out via different hardware interfaces such as RS232, RS485, GigE Ethernet or USB connections.
With the configurable tracker protocol different tracker boards and systems can be integrated into the software and the inspection process, no matter which interface. 

The Cork Inspector can be also integrated into complex bottling plants.Process integration and communication can be carried out via standard software interfaces, for example OPC UA, Profinet, Modbus or also standard Ethernet UDP and TCP/IP and the results, with images, can be displayed at the control station

The Cork Inspector includes pre-configured bottle types and can be adjusted to new types. Adjustment can be carried out either by configuring existing bottle types or new parameters can be set up.

> [post_excerpt] =>

The Cork Inspector is a new addition to the Eye Vision Technology (EVT) emSens Beverage Inspection series. It can inspect corks in bottles, to ensure they are in the correct position, or stick out too much (convex) or are seated too deep in the bottle neck (concave). [post_date_gmt] => 2019-08-19 14:07:31 [post_date] => 2019-08-19 14:07:31 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-08-19 14:07:31 [post_modified] => 2019-08-19 14:07:31 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => CEE-172406 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => global/showimage.ashx?Type=Article&ID=178809 image/jpeg ) [syndication_source] => Control Engineering Europe - All Articles [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_source_id] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed_id] => 17 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/rss/article/172406/Cork-inspection-vision-solution.aspx [syndication_item_hash] => 1063a92b9215bbf646f347c5a200d1cd [faf_process_image] => ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )


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Machine vision starts to think for itself

Array ( [post_title] => Machine vision starts to think for itself [post_content] =>

Machine vision starts to think for itself

Yonatan Hyatt discusses one of the latest developments in machine vision which sees the technology starting to think for itself.

Machine vision technology has proved invaluable for quality control during the processing and packaging of food products. In the last 20 years applications for machine vision have grown significantly, cementing the technology’s place as a vital aspect of food manufacturing. The market growth of automation and robotics is a key driver to the machine vision industry, as automated technologies rely heavily on vision and imaging to perform their roles effectively. Developments of image registration, computer-vision, deep learning and other artificial intelligence (AI) technologies are beginning to enable radical market change. 

A core application for machine vision technology is in quality assurance (QA) to help determine whether food products or packaging are defective before leaving the factory. Food processing companies may check the size, shape and colour of a potato product or may want to assess the fat content in a meat product. They will also check that packaging, both primary and secondary – are not defective and that any labelling is correct.  Both regulatory and customer demands for quality, combined with increasing competitive pressures, have increased the requirement for QA managers to ensure visual inspection is performed.
 
Identifying defective products
Food processing best practice requires investment in machine vision QA products to identify defective products or packaging and, if possible, why they occurred. Historically, up until the introduction of autonomous machine vision systems, the industry has been rife with challenges. This is because solutions are complex, time-consuming and expensive to install and set up.

Traditionally, machine vision solutions have been complex, often requiring a systems integrator to complete the project — from creating proof-of-concept and test plans, to selecting components and bringing it all together as a hard-engineered solution on the production line. 

Another challenge that has plagued the industry has been a lack of flexibility of machine vision solutions. This means that any minor environmental change or alteration to the product being inspected requires the return of the integrator. In many cases, the original solution will be rendered completely obsolete, unsuitable for the new application, despite the vast investment required to implement it.

To overcome these challenges, and to directly address QA managers’ true needs on industrial production lines across the globe, Inspekto developed what it believes to be the world’s first autonomous machine vision system which allows food businesses to benefit from visual QA at any point on the production line at one-tenth of the cost and at least 1,000 times the installation speed. The system is suitable for any handling method – from manual to automated – and can be used for visual quality inspection and sorting. 

In stark contrast to more complex assemblies of traditional machine vision, this autonomous machine vision solution consists of a single, standalone appliance — integrating software and hardware which allows for easy and low-cost installation, removing the need for a systems integrator.

The system consists of four main parts – the vision sensor, the arm, the mounting adaptor and the controller. A straightforward process designed to take less than one hour, is all that is required to install it on any production line. The operator must first choose the position of the vision sensor so that it captures the entire surface of the part to be inspected. Next, a mounting point close to the vision sensor must be selected. The mounting adaptor can then be assembled onto any Bosch profile in the plant, and the telescopic arm assembled and attached to the vision sensor. 

Following these steps, the operator can connect the controller and the system will automatically launch. To set up inspection, the operator draws a polygon to form an outline around the part to be inspected, selecting regions of interest and regions to exclude. The entire process, from the moment the product is taken out of the box, requires no training.

The AI approach
Once the system is up and running, the holistic AI approach of the system kicks in. To ensure the clearest, most informative images are acquired an AI algorithm optimises the camera and illumination settings for the object and environment. From this point, the algorithm can detect and localise the object without any operator input. Rather than a machine vision expert defining the detection and localisation algorithm, the system is ready to go.

The final step is for the operator to verify some good sample references to enable the system to learn what a gold standard product looks like. It will use as few references as possible to do this, depending on the part that is being inspected and its movement profile. The inspection process can then begin. 

Each new image will be compared with the gold standard references to verify the shape tolerances and surface variations. Because the system is not searching for predefined defects or comparing against defective parts, it will detect defects that were never considered by the manufacturer before. 

Because of the self-adapting capabilities of the system, manufacturers can easily move the system to another point on the production line as and when required. Furthermore, because the system is simple and affordable to install, it enables total QA, where machine vision technology can be incorporated at any point of the production line to track every step. It makes it easy to identify a defective product, where the defect has been introduced and therefore to determine why a product is faulty. As one plant manager put it ‘the move to autonomous machine vision systems enables plants not only to protect their customers from defected products, but also to protect the plants from scrap and flawed manufacturing processes’. 

Yonatan Hyatt is chief technology officer at Inspekto.

> [post_excerpt] =>

Yonatan Hyatt discusses one of the latest developments in machine vision which sees the technology starting to think for itself. [post_date_gmt] => 2019-08-17 15:04:32 [post_date] => 2019-08-17 15:04:32 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-08-17 15:04:32 [post_modified] => 2019-08-17 15:04:32 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => CEE-172400 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => global/showimage.ashx?Type=Article&ID=178802 image/jpeg ) [syndication_source] => Control Engineering Europe - All Articles [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_source_id] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed_id] => 17 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/rss/article/172400/Machine-vision-starts-to-think-for-itself.aspx [syndication_item_hash] => 0a4a8fbc3614fa2528f3b6ec398bed42 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

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Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => global/showimage.ashx?Type=Article&ID=178802 image/jpeg ) [syndication_source] => Control Engineering Europe - All Articles [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_source_id] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed_id] => 17 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/rss/article/172400/Machine-vision-starts-to-think-for-itself.aspx [syndication_item_hash] => 0a4a8fbc3614fa2528f3b6ec398bed42 )

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Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :Machine vision starts to think for itself

Array ( [post_title] => Machine vision starts to think for itself [post_content] =>

Machine vision starts to think for itself

Yonatan Hyatt discusses one of the latest developments in machine vision which sees the technology starting to think for itself.

Machine vision technology has proved invaluable for quality control during the processing and packaging of food products. In the last 20 years applications for machine vision have grown significantly, cementing the technology’s place as a vital aspect of food manufacturing. The market growth of automation and robotics is a key driver to the machine vision industry, as automated technologies rely heavily on vision and imaging to perform their roles effectively. Developments of image registration, computer-vision, deep learning and other artificial intelligence (AI) technologies are beginning to enable radical market change. 

A core application for machine vision technology is in quality assurance (QA) to help determine whether food products or packaging are defective before leaving the factory. Food processing companies may check the size, shape and colour of a potato product or may want to assess the fat content in a meat product. They will also check that packaging, both primary and secondary – are not defective and that any labelling is correct.  Both regulatory and customer demands for quality, combined with increasing competitive pressures, have increased the requirement for QA managers to ensure visual inspection is performed.
 
Identifying defective products
Food processing best practice requires investment in machine vision QA products to identify defective products or packaging and, if possible, why they occurred. Historically, up until the introduction of autonomous machine vision systems, the industry has been rife with challenges. This is because solutions are complex, time-consuming and expensive to install and set up.

Traditionally, machine vision solutions have been complex, often requiring a systems integrator to complete the project — from creating proof-of-concept and test plans, to selecting components and bringing it all together as a hard-engineered solution on the production line. 

Another challenge that has plagued the industry has been a lack of flexibility of machine vision solutions. This means that any minor environmental change or alteration to the product being inspected requires the return of the integrator. In many cases, the original solution will be rendered completely obsolete, unsuitable for the new application, despite the vast investment required to implement it.

To overcome these challenges, and to directly address QA managers’ true needs on industrial production lines across the globe, Inspekto developed what it believes to be the world’s first autonomous machine vision system which allows food businesses to benefit from visual QA at any point on the production line at one-tenth of the cost and at least 1,000 times the installation speed. The system is suitable for any handling method – from manual to automated – and can be used for visual quality inspection and sorting. 

In stark contrast to more complex assemblies of traditional machine vision, this autonomous machine vision solution consists of a single, standalone appliance — integrating software and hardware which allows for easy and low-cost installation, removing the need for a systems integrator.

The system consists of four main parts – the vision sensor, the arm, the mounting adaptor and the controller. A straightforward process designed to take less than one hour, is all that is required to install it on any production line. The operator must first choose the position of the vision sensor so that it captures the entire surface of the part to be inspected. Next, a mounting point close to the vision sensor must be selected. The mounting adaptor can then be assembled onto any Bosch profile in the plant, and the telescopic arm assembled and attached to the vision sensor. 

Following these steps, the operator can connect the controller and the system will automatically launch. To set up inspection, the operator draws a polygon to form an outline around the part to be inspected, selecting regions of interest and regions to exclude. The entire process, from the moment the product is taken out of the box, requires no training.

The AI approach
Once the system is up and running, the holistic AI approach of the system kicks in. To ensure the clearest, most informative images are acquired an AI algorithm optimises the camera and illumination settings for the object and environment. From this point, the algorithm can detect and localise the object without any operator input. Rather than a machine vision expert defining the detection and localisation algorithm, the system is ready to go.

The final step is for the operator to verify some good sample references to enable the system to learn what a gold standard product looks like. It will use as few references as possible to do this, depending on the part that is being inspected and its movement profile. The inspection process can then begin. 

Each new image will be compared with the gold standard references to verify the shape tolerances and surface variations. Because the system is not searching for predefined defects or comparing against defective parts, it will detect defects that were never considered by the manufacturer before. 

Because of the self-adapting capabilities of the system, manufacturers can easily move the system to another point on the production line as and when required. Furthermore, because the system is simple and affordable to install, it enables total QA, where machine vision technology can be incorporated at any point of the production line to track every step. It makes it easy to identify a defective product, where the defect has been introduced and therefore to determine why a product is faulty. As one plant manager put it ‘the move to autonomous machine vision systems enables plants not only to protect their customers from defected products, but also to protect the plants from scrap and flawed manufacturing processes’. 

Yonatan Hyatt is chief technology officer at Inspekto.

> [post_excerpt] =>

Yonatan Hyatt discusses one of the latest developments in machine vision which sees the technology starting to think for itself. [post_date_gmt] => 2019-08-17 15:04:32 [post_date] => 2019-08-17 15:04:32 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-08-17 15:04:32 [post_modified] => 2019-08-17 15:04:32 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => CEE-172400 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => global/showimage.ashx?Type=Article&ID=178802 image/jpeg ) [syndication_source] => Control Engineering Europe - All Articles [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_source_id] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed_id] => 17 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/rss/article/172400/Machine-vision-starts-to-think-for-itself.aspx [syndication_item_hash] => 0a4a8fbc3614fa2528f3b6ec398bed42 [faf_process_image] => ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )


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Meeting level measurement challenges with radar

Array ( [post_title] => Meeting level measurement challenges with radar [post_content] =>

Meeting level measurement challenges with radar

Denny Nelson explains how the latest non-contacting radar transmitters can overcome food processing challenges using frequency modulated continuous wave technology.

There are various reasons why accurate and reliable level measurement is essential in the tanks, silos, hoppers and bins in which products are processed or stored. These include optimising inventory management and stock availability, and helping to ensure consistent product quality, all of which can affect profitability.

However, level measurement instrumentation must be able to withstand the challenging conditions present in typical food and beverage production applications. These include long measurement distances in tall silos, materials with a low dielectric constant, along with dust and uneven surfaces when measuring solids and powders. Devices must also comply with strict hygiene requirements to prevent product contamination.

A wide range of level measurement technologies are typically employed within modern food and beverage production. These include guided wave radar transmitters, differential pressure transmitters, vibrating fork level switches, capacitance point level switches, ultrasonic transmitters, acoustic transmitters, laser-based devices and load cells. These technologies must not only be able to meet the demands of each specific application, but must also have food grade parts and the appropriate certification for use in hygienic applications.

An innovative new level measurement technology for challenging food and beverage applications is non-contacting radar transmitters. These devices provide accurate continuous level measurements without touching the material surface, which results in low maintenance requirements, helping to ensure long-term reliability. In addition, their on-board diagnostics capability supports preventive maintenance. Non-contacting radar transmitters have a large measurement range capability and also provide the benefit of being unaffected by a wide range of process conditions, such as density, viscosity, conductivity, coating, corrosiveness, vapours, and changing pressure and temperature.

Modulation techniques
Non-contacting radar transmitters use one of two main modulation techniques – either pulse radar or frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) – to perform level measurements. The sensitivity of devices based on FMCW technology can be more than 30 times higher than that of pulse transmitters. This means that their signal strength is greater, enabling them to provide superior measurement accuracy and reliability, even when measuring materials with a low dielectric constant.

In solids applications in small to medium-sized silos, where there can be rapid changes in level, the latest FMCW transmitters can provide high accuracy by using a measurement algorithm that merges the peaks of an uneven surface. Large amounts of dust are created during fill cycles, which can pose problems for some level measurement technologies. Non-contacting radar transmitters usually handle dust well, but the signal can be blocked if there is a heavy layer of dust on the antenna. However, the latest FMCW devices can overcome this challenge with an integrated air purging system for cleaning the antenna.

Although FMCW technology provides advantages in terms of sensitivity and accuracy, its need for more processing power has traditionally been a drawback. For this reason, FMCW technology was typically deployed only within four-wire devices, thereby often requiring users to put additional cable infrastructure in place, which is costly and time-consuming. However, advanced two-wire FMCW transmitters are now available, enabling simple installation using existing cable infrastructure, and thus reducing costs and saving time. These transmitters overcome the problem of high processing power requirements for FMCW technology by replacing the traditional circuit board with radar-on-chip technology, enabling them to be less power-hungry and more energy-efficient.

Denny Nelson is a marketing engineer at Emerson Automation Solutions.

> [post_excerpt] =>

Denny Nelson explains how the latest non-contacting radar transmitters can overcome food processing challenges using frequency modulated continuous wave technology. [post_date_gmt] => 2019-08-17 14:59:27 [post_date] => 2019-08-17 14:59:27 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-08-17 14:59:27 [post_modified] => 2019-08-17 14:59:27 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => CEE-172399 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => global/showimage.ashx?Type=Article&ID=178801 image/jpeg ) [syndication_source] => Control Engineering Europe - All Articles [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_source_id] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed_id] => 17 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/rss/article/172399/Meeting-level-measurement-challenges-with-radar.aspx [syndication_item_hash] => 3aa9ad763902dcb60bbc92eb9463a6f0 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

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Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => global/showimage.ashx?Type=Article&ID=178801 image/jpeg ) [syndication_source] => Control Engineering Europe - All Articles [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_source_id] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed_id] => 17 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/rss/article/172399/Meeting-level-measurement-challenges-with-radar.aspx [syndication_item_hash] => 3aa9ad763902dcb60bbc92eb9463a6f0 )

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Array ( [0] => global/showimage.ashx?Type=Article&ID=178801 image/jpeg )

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Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :Meeting level measurement challenges with radar

Array ( [post_title] => Meeting level measurement challenges with radar [post_content] =>

Meeting level measurement challenges with radar

Denny Nelson explains how the latest non-contacting radar transmitters can overcome food processing challenges using frequency modulated continuous wave technology.

There are various reasons why accurate and reliable level measurement is essential in the tanks, silos, hoppers and bins in which products are processed or stored. These include optimising inventory management and stock availability, and helping to ensure consistent product quality, all of which can affect profitability.

However, level measurement instrumentation must be able to withstand the challenging conditions present in typical food and beverage production applications. These include long measurement distances in tall silos, materials with a low dielectric constant, along with dust and uneven surfaces when measuring solids and powders. Devices must also comply with strict hygiene requirements to prevent product contamination.

A wide range of level measurement technologies are typically employed within modern food and beverage production. These include guided wave radar transmitters, differential pressure transmitters, vibrating fork level switches, capacitance point level switches, ultrasonic transmitters, acoustic transmitters, laser-based devices and load cells. These technologies must not only be able to meet the demands of each specific application, but must also have food grade parts and the appropriate certification for use in hygienic applications.

An innovative new level measurement technology for challenging food and beverage applications is non-contacting radar transmitters. These devices provide accurate continuous level measurements without touching the material surface, which results in low maintenance requirements, helping to ensure long-term reliability. In addition, their on-board diagnostics capability supports preventive maintenance. Non-contacting radar transmitters have a large measurement range capability and also provide the benefit of being unaffected by a wide range of process conditions, such as density, viscosity, conductivity, coating, corrosiveness, vapours, and changing pressure and temperature.

Modulation techniques
Non-contacting radar transmitters use one of two main modulation techniques – either pulse radar or frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) – to perform level measurements. The sensitivity of devices based on FMCW technology can be more than 30 times higher than that of pulse transmitters. This means that their signal strength is greater, enabling them to provide superior measurement accuracy and reliability, even when measuring materials with a low dielectric constant.

In solids applications in small to medium-sized silos, where there can be rapid changes in level, the latest FMCW transmitters can provide high accuracy by using a measurement algorithm that merges the peaks of an uneven surface. Large amounts of dust are created during fill cycles, which can pose problems for some level measurement technologies. Non-contacting radar transmitters usually handle dust well, but the signal can be blocked if there is a heavy layer of dust on the antenna. However, the latest FMCW devices can overcome this challenge with an integrated air purging system for cleaning the antenna.

Although FMCW technology provides advantages in terms of sensitivity and accuracy, its need for more processing power has traditionally been a drawback. For this reason, FMCW technology was typically deployed only within four-wire devices, thereby often requiring users to put additional cable infrastructure in place, which is costly and time-consuming. However, advanced two-wire FMCW transmitters are now available, enabling simple installation using existing cable infrastructure, and thus reducing costs and saving time. These transmitters overcome the problem of high processing power requirements for FMCW technology by replacing the traditional circuit board with radar-on-chip technology, enabling them to be less power-hungry and more energy-efficient.

Denny Nelson is a marketing engineer at Emerson Automation Solutions.

> [post_excerpt] =>

Denny Nelson explains how the latest non-contacting radar transmitters can overcome food processing challenges using frequency modulated continuous wave technology. [post_date_gmt] => 2019-08-17 14:59:27 [post_date] => 2019-08-17 14:59:27 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-08-17 14:59:27 [post_modified] => 2019-08-17 14:59:27 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => CEE-172399 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => global/showimage.ashx?Type=Article&ID=178801 image/jpeg ) [syndication_source] => Control Engineering Europe - All Articles [syndication_source_uri] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_source_id] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed] => http://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/all.ashx [syndication_feed_id] => 17 [syndication_permalink] => https://www.controlengeurope.com/rss/rss/article/172399/Meeting-level-measurement-challenges-with-radar.aspx [syndication_item_hash] => 3aa9ad763902dcb60bbc92eb9463a6f0 [faf_process_image] => ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( ) [post_tag] => Array ( ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )


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AEP Industries Inc. Announces Results of Special Meeting

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Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :AEP Industries Inc. Announces Results of Special Meeting

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AEP INDUSTRIES INC. REPORTS FISCAL 2016 RESULTS

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Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :AEP INDUSTRIES INC. REPORTS FISCAL 2016 RESULTS

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FAF deciding on filters on post to be syndicated:

AEP Industries Inc. and Berry Plastics Group, Inc. Announce January 18, 2017 Election Deadline

Array ( [post_title] => AEP Industries Inc. and Berry Plastics Group, Inc. Announce January 18, 2017 Election Deadline [post_content] => [post_date_gmt] => 2017-01-10 16:28:19 [post_date] => 2017-01-10 16:28:19 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-01-10 16:28:19 [post_modified] => 2017-01-10 16:28:19 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => http://www.aepinc.com/news/?p=774 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => AEP Industries [syndication_source_uri] => http://www.aepinc.com/news [syndication_source_id] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/AEPIndustries [rss:comments] => http://www.aepinc.com/news/2017/01/aep-industries-inc-and-berry-plastics-group-inc-announce-january-18-2017-election-deadline/#comments [wfw:commentRSS] => http://www.aepinc.com/news/2017/01/aep-industries-inc-and-berry-plastics-group-inc-announce-january-18-2017-election-deadline/feed/ [syndication_feed] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/AEPIndustries [syndication_feed_id] => 103 [syndication_permalink] => http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/AEPIndustries/~3/5rel900yTNs/ [syndication_item_hash] => c8000fbfca02e175ff95d49a3926f1f6 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( [0] => 613 [1] => 392 ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 3487 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

Doing filter:faf_image_filter

Execute image filter

Image process

Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => AEP Industries [syndication_source_uri] => http://www.aepinc.com/news [syndication_source_id] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/AEPIndustries [rss:comments] => http://www.aepinc.com/news/2017/01/aep-industries-inc-and-berry-plastics-group-inc-announce-january-18-2017-election-deadline/#comments [wfw:commentRSS] => http://www.aepinc.com/news/2017/01/aep-industries-inc-and-berry-plastics-group-inc-announce-january-18-2017-election-deadline/feed/ [syndication_feed] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/AEPIndustries [syndication_feed_id] => 103 [syndication_permalink] => http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/AEPIndustries/~3/5rel900yTNs/ [syndication_item_hash] => c8000fbfca02e175ff95d49a3926f1f6 )

Execute : Enclosure images

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Array ( [0] => )

No match on

Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :AEP Industries Inc. and Berry Plastics Group, Inc. Announce January 18, 2017 Election Deadline

Array ( [post_title] => AEP Industries Inc. and Berry Plastics Group, Inc. Announce January 18, 2017 Election Deadline [post_content] => [post_date_gmt] => 2017-01-10 16:28:19 [post_date] => 2017-01-10 16:28:19 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-01-10 16:28:19 [post_modified] => 2017-01-10 16:28:19 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => http://www.aepinc.com/news/?p=774 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => AEP Industries [syndication_source_uri] => http://www.aepinc.com/news [syndication_source_id] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/AEPIndustries [rss:comments] => http://www.aepinc.com/news/2017/01/aep-industries-inc-and-berry-plastics-group-inc-announce-january-18-2017-election-deadline/#comments [wfw:commentRSS] => http://www.aepinc.com/news/2017/01/aep-industries-inc-and-berry-plastics-group-inc-announce-january-18-2017-election-deadline/feed/ [syndication_feed] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/AEPIndustries [syndication_feed_id] => 103 [syndication_permalink] => http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/AEPIndustries/~3/5rel900yTNs/ [syndication_item_hash] => c8000fbfca02e175ff95d49a3926f1f6 [faf_process_image] => ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( [0] => 613 [1] => 392 ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 3487 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) [post_excerpt] => )

FAF deciding on filters on post to be syndicated:

AEP INDUSTRIES INC. ANNOUNCES FIRST QUARTER FISCAL 2017 DIVIDEND

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Doing filter:faf_image_filter

Execute image filter

Image process

Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => AEP Industries [syndication_source_uri] => http://www.aepinc.com/news [syndication_source_id] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/AEPIndustries [rss:comments] => http://www.aepinc.com/news/2016/10/aep-industries-inc-announces-first-quarter-fiscal-2017-dividend/#comments [wfw:commentRSS] => http://www.aepinc.com/news/2016/10/aep-industries-inc-announces-first-quarter-fiscal-2017-dividend/feed/ [syndication_feed] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/AEPIndustries [syndication_feed_id] => 103 [syndication_permalink] => http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/AEPIndustries/~3/yNdAFDQbVDk/ [syndication_item_hash] => 50563b0d6f5e782575d954a02754e8e2 )

Execute : Enclosure images

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Array ( [0] => )

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Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :AEP INDUSTRIES INC. ANNOUNCES FIRST QUARTER FISCAL 2017 DIVIDEND

Array ( [post_title] => AEP INDUSTRIES INC. ANNOUNCES FIRST QUARTER FISCAL 2017 DIVIDEND [post_content] => [post_date_gmt] => 2016-10-19 13:14:15 [post_date] => 2016-10-19 13:14:15 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-10-19 13:14:15 [post_modified] => 2016-10-19 13:14:15 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => http://www.aepinc.com/news/?p=770 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => AEP Industries [syndication_source_uri] => http://www.aepinc.com/news [syndication_source_id] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/AEPIndustries [rss:comments] => http://www.aepinc.com/news/2016/10/aep-industries-inc-announces-first-quarter-fiscal-2017-dividend/#comments [wfw:commentRSS] => http://www.aepinc.com/news/2016/10/aep-industries-inc-announces-first-quarter-fiscal-2017-dividend/feed/ [syndication_feed] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/AEPIndustries [syndication_feed_id] => 103 [syndication_permalink] => http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/AEPIndustries/~3/yNdAFDQbVDk/ [syndication_item_hash] => 50563b0d6f5e782575d954a02754e8e2 [faf_process_image] => ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( [0] => 613 [1] => 392 ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 3487 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) [post_excerpt] => )

FAF deciding on filters on post to be syndicated:

AEP INDUSTRIES INC. REPORTS FISCAL 2016 THIRD QUARTER AND YEAR-TO- DATE RESULTS

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Doing filter:faf_image_filter

Execute image filter

Image process

Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => AEP Industries [syndication_source_uri] => http://www.aepinc.com/news [syndication_source_id] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/AEPIndustries [rss:comments] => http://www.aepinc.com/news/2016/09/aep-industries-inc-reports-fiscal-2016-third-quarter-and-year-to-date-results/#comments [wfw:commentRSS] => http://www.aepinc.com/news/2016/09/aep-industries-inc-reports-fiscal-2016-third-quarter-and-year-to-date-results/feed/ [syndication_feed] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/AEPIndustries [syndication_feed_id] => 103 [syndication_permalink] => http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/AEPIndustries/~3/tgZbzYuTUaY/ [syndication_item_hash] => cb73fdf27384197084ab02ec6cee9add )

Execute : Enclosure images

Enclosure save:

Array ( [0] => )

No match on

Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :AEP INDUSTRIES INC. REPORTS FISCAL 2016 THIRD QUARTER AND YEAR-TO- DATE RESULTS

Array ( [post_title] => AEP INDUSTRIES INC. REPORTS FISCAL 2016 THIRD QUARTER AND YEAR-TO- DATE RESULTS [post_content] => [post_date_gmt] => 2016-09-09 13:27:46 [post_date] => 2016-09-09 13:27:46 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-09-09 13:27:46 [post_modified] => 2016-09-09 13:27:46 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => http://www.aepinc.com/news/?p=761 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => AEP Industries [syndication_source_uri] => http://www.aepinc.com/news [syndication_source_id] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/AEPIndustries [rss:comments] => http://www.aepinc.com/news/2016/09/aep-industries-inc-reports-fiscal-2016-third-quarter-and-year-to-date-results/#comments [wfw:commentRSS] => http://www.aepinc.com/news/2016/09/aep-industries-inc-reports-fiscal-2016-third-quarter-and-year-to-date-results/feed/ [syndication_feed] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/AEPIndustries [syndication_feed_id] => 103 [syndication_permalink] => http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/AEPIndustries/~3/tgZbzYuTUaY/ [syndication_item_hash] => cb73fdf27384197084ab02ec6cee9add [faf_process_image] => ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( [0] => 613 [1] => 392 ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 3487 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) [post_excerpt] => )

FAF deciding on filters on post to be syndicated:

Berry Plastics Group, Inc. Announces Agreement to Acquire AEP Industries Inc.

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Doing filter:faf_image_filter

Execute image filter

Image process

Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => AEP Industries [syndication_source_uri] => http://www.aepinc.com/news [syndication_source_id] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/AEPIndustries [rss:comments] => http://www.aepinc.com/news/2016/08/berry-plastics-group-inc-announces-agreement-to-acquire-aep-industries-inc/#comments [wfw:commentRSS] => http://www.aepinc.com/news/2016/08/berry-plastics-group-inc-announces-agreement-to-acquire-aep-industries-inc/feed/ [syndication_feed] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/AEPIndustries [syndication_feed_id] => 103 [syndication_permalink] => http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/AEPIndustries/~3/-sUFD5q4I7c/ [syndication_item_hash] => 0213b9077ea07c3541cdb0f8e73791dd )

Execute : Enclosure images

Enclosure save:

Array ( [0] => )

No match on

Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :Berry Plastics Group, Inc. Announces Agreement to Acquire AEP Industries Inc.

Array ( [post_title] => Berry Plastics Group, Inc. Announces Agreement to Acquire AEP Industries Inc. [post_content] => [post_date_gmt] => 2016-08-25 18:44:56 [post_date] => 2016-08-25 18:44:56 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-08-25 18:44:56 [post_modified] => 2016-08-25 18:44:56 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => http://www.aepinc.com/news/?p=757 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => AEP Industries [syndication_source_uri] => http://www.aepinc.com/news [syndication_source_id] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/AEPIndustries [rss:comments] => http://www.aepinc.com/news/2016/08/berry-plastics-group-inc-announces-agreement-to-acquire-aep-industries-inc/#comments [wfw:commentRSS] => http://www.aepinc.com/news/2016/08/berry-plastics-group-inc-announces-agreement-to-acquire-aep-industries-inc/feed/ [syndication_feed] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/AEPIndustries [syndication_feed_id] => 103 [syndication_permalink] => http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/AEPIndustries/~3/-sUFD5q4I7c/ [syndication_item_hash] => 0213b9077ea07c3541cdb0f8e73791dd [faf_process_image] => ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( [0] => 613 [1] => 392 ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 3487 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) [post_excerpt] => )

FAF deciding on filters on post to be syndicated:

AEP Industries Inc. Announces Fourth Quarter Fiscal 2016 Dividend

Array ( [post_title] => AEP Industries Inc. Announces Fourth Quarter Fiscal 2016 Dividend [post_content] => [post_date_gmt] => 2016-07-20 13:26:03 [post_date] => 2016-07-20 13:26:03 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-07-20 13:26:03 [post_modified] => 2016-07-20 13:26:03 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => http://www.aepinc.com/news/?p=753 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => AEP Industries [syndication_source_uri] => http://www.aepinc.com/news [syndication_source_id] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/AEPIndustries [rss:comments] => http://www.aepinc.com/news/2016/07/aep-industries-inc-announces-fourth-quarter-fiscal-2016-dividend/#comments [wfw:commentRSS] => http://www.aepinc.com/news/2016/07/aep-industries-inc-announces-fourth-quarter-fiscal-2016-dividend/feed/ [syndication_feed] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/AEPIndustries [syndication_feed_id] => 103 [syndication_permalink] => http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/AEPIndustries/~3/eSq1AFnHWmE/ [syndication_item_hash] => 71e8972e3ec81e0dcf61df2c2e2a2008 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( [0] => 613 [1] => 392 ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 3487 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

Doing filter:faf_image_filter

Execute image filter

Image process

Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => AEP Industries [syndication_source_uri] => http://www.aepinc.com/news [syndication_source_id] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/AEPIndustries [rss:comments] => http://www.aepinc.com/news/2016/07/aep-industries-inc-announces-fourth-quarter-fiscal-2016-dividend/#comments [wfw:commentRSS] => http://www.aepinc.com/news/2016/07/aep-industries-inc-announces-fourth-quarter-fiscal-2016-dividend/feed/ [syndication_feed] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/AEPIndustries [syndication_feed_id] => 103 [syndication_permalink] => http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/AEPIndustries/~3/eSq1AFnHWmE/ [syndication_item_hash] => 71e8972e3ec81e0dcf61df2c2e2a2008 )

Execute : Enclosure images

Enclosure save:

Array ( [0] => )

No match on

Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :AEP Industries Inc. Announces Fourth Quarter Fiscal 2016 Dividend

Array ( [post_title] => AEP Industries Inc. Announces Fourth Quarter Fiscal 2016 Dividend [post_content] => [post_date_gmt] => 2016-07-20 13:26:03 [post_date] => 2016-07-20 13:26:03 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-07-20 13:26:03 [post_modified] => 2016-07-20 13:26:03 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => http://www.aepinc.com/news/?p=753 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => AEP Industries [syndication_source_uri] => http://www.aepinc.com/news [syndication_source_id] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/AEPIndustries [rss:comments] => http://www.aepinc.com/news/2016/07/aep-industries-inc-announces-fourth-quarter-fiscal-2016-dividend/#comments [wfw:commentRSS] => http://www.aepinc.com/news/2016/07/aep-industries-inc-announces-fourth-quarter-fiscal-2016-dividend/feed/ [syndication_feed] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/AEPIndustries [syndication_feed_id] => 103 [syndication_permalink] => http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/AEPIndustries/~3/eSq1AFnHWmE/ [syndication_item_hash] => 71e8972e3ec81e0dcf61df2c2e2a2008 [faf_process_image] => ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( [0] => 613 [1] => 392 ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 3487 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) [post_excerpt] => )

FAF deciding on filters on post to be syndicated:

AEP INDUSTRIES INC. REPORTS FISCAL 2016 SECOND QUARTER AND YEAR-TO-DATE RESULTS

Array ( [post_title] => AEP INDUSTRIES INC. REPORTS FISCAL 2016 SECOND QUARTER AND YEAR-TO-DATE RESULTS [post_content] => [post_date_gmt] => 2016-06-09 16:34:09 [post_date] => 2016-06-09 16:34:09 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-06-09 16:34:09 [post_modified] => 2016-06-09 16:34:09 [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => http://www.aepinc.com/news/?p=735 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => AEP Industries [syndication_source_uri] => http://www.aepinc.com/news [syndication_source_id] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/AEPIndustries [rss:comments] => http://www.aepinc.com/news/2016/06/aep-industries-inc-reports-fiscal-2016-second-quarter-and-year-to-date-results/#comments [wfw:commentRSS] => http://www.aepinc.com/news/2016/06/aep-industries-inc-reports-fiscal-2016-second-quarter-and-year-to-date-results/feed/ [syndication_feed] => http://feeds.feedburner.com/AEPIndustries [syndication_feed_id] => 103 [syndication_permalink] => http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/AEPIndustries/~3/pjDsNpWmCeI/ [syndication_item_hash] => 36ca07ee3f4b1792f26a307fa2180197 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 1 [tax_input] => Array ( [category] => Array ( [0] => 613 [1] => 392 ) [post_tag] => Array ( [0] => 3487 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

Doing filter:faf_image_filter

Execute image filter

Image process

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Execute : Enclosure images

Enclosure save:

Array ( [0] => )

No match on

Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :AEP INDUSTRIES INC. REPORTS FISCAL 2016 SECOND QUARTER AND YEAR-TO-DATE RESULTS

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FAF deciding on filters on post to be syndicated:

AEP Industries Inc. Announces Third Quarter Fiscal 2016 Dividend

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Doing filter:faf_image_filter

Execute image filter

Image process

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Execute : Enclosure images

Enclosure save:

Array ( [0] => )

No match on

Decide filter: Returning post, everything seems orderly :AEP Industries Inc. Announces Third Quarter Fiscal 2016 Dividend

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How Using Electric Linear Actuators Can Save You Money

Array ( [post_title] => How Using Electric Linear Actuators Can Save You Money [post_content] =>

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